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Inertia Disadvantage

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In a recent posting, it was mentioned that one disadvantage of the inertia system is that if fired while holding the gun against a concrete wall, the action will not cycle. Is this just internet rumor, or has someone actually tried it?

 

Could anyone please explain to me why I would care if my M-2 will not cycle while holding it against a concrete wall, or any other immovable object? I don't mean to sound like a smart**s, but can anyone give me a possible scenario when this "fact" might be of any importance to anyone? Curious minds would like to know!

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In a recent posting, it was mentioned that one disadvantage of the inertia system is that if fired while holding the gun against a concrete wall, the action will not cycle. Is this just internet rumor, or has someone actually tried it?

 

Could anyone please explain to me why I would care if my M-2 will not cycle while holding it against a concrete wall, or any other immovable object? I don't mean to sound like a smart**s, but can anyone give me a possible scenario when this "fact" might be of any importance to anyone? Curious minds would like to know!

 

inertia guns will not fire on my shoulder for the same reason. Its like a concrete wall.:D

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In a recent posting, it was mentioned that one disadvantage of the inertia system is that if fired while holding the gun against a concrete wall, the action will not cycle. Is this just internet rumor, or has someone actually tried it?

 

Tried this actually with a supersport. It cycled just fine, so my vote would be on "Internet rumor." Now, I assumed they meant holding the buttstock against the concrete. I suppose if you laid it down on it's right side so the charging handle was against the floor, stood on it, and then pulled the trigger, it might not cycle well. Then again, it would be hard to pattern properly in this firing configuration as well.

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I've never heard this. With an inertia style action you would think it would be the exact opposite.

 

In fact the only time I've had problems with action not cycling properly was when I let a friend of mine shoot it. We were shooting trap loads and he weighs about 130 soaking wet. He never shot a gun before and the gun didn't cycle well for him when he didn't shoulder it properly. I didn't have any problems when I shot but I'm pretty solid (concrete wall):D

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>>it was mentioned that one disadvantage of the inertia system is that if fired while holding the gun against a concrete wall, the action will not cycle.

 

Why would anyone care? I have two Benelli Sport lls, and have yet to find a need to fire them when held against a concrete wall.

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Whether this is true or not, I don't know.

 

In theory, for an inertial semi-auto to work, there needs to be some backwards movement of the entire gun, which is then stopped by your shoulder, and the inertia of the bolt continues backwards to cycle the action.

 

As such, if the gun never moves, supposedly the bolt will never release to cycle the action.

 

Like I said, I don't know if its true, and it kind of doesn't matter, since there are very few scenarios where this will be the case.

 

Only one I can think of, and even this is a stretch.

 

If you were turkey hunting with your back up against a tree or some other immovable object, and your shoulder was right against the tree, I suppose this could happen.

 

But like I said, its a stretch.

 

(The opposite is true, also, as evidenced by the light shooter noted above. If you "limp-shoulder" an inertial gun, there isn't enough resistance of the gun to backwards movement to get the action to cycle.)

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I heard the same thing but you need to place against concreat wall "with recoil pad removed" to get it not to cycle.

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I guess if you get in that extreme scenario of being up against a concrete wall with the gun not shouldered, you better make the one shot you do get count! That should buy you some time to get off the wall and finish the job:D

 

Maybe Tom Knapp or Tim will find a way to add this to the show..

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Guest cynckayancy

Bought a 3000 stf from Dicks. Took it out yesterday for the 2nd time and sometimes the top barel does not "set up". Is it possible I shoulderd it so tight that the inertia sysem does not work? any ideas?

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Bought a 3000 stf from Dicks. Took it out yesterday for the 2nd time and sometimes the top barel does not "set up". Is it possible I shoulderd it so tight that the inertia sysem does not work? any ideas?

You're confusing an inertia trigger switchover system of an O/U with the Benelli "Inertia Driven" system for autoloader bolt lockup and cycling. Different animals.

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i heard that if the gun doesn't move in a rearward motion the action will not cycle so people say light loads with hardly and recoil will not have enough rearward motion to cycle the action :confused: so by placing it against a wall were the recoil would not be present really would be like a trap load recoil and would not cycle

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I even had an individual at work bring up this supposed fact and only the only recourse I could think of was why would you do it in the first place? I guess it would be a cheap alternative to a Caldwell Lead Sled! Enquiring minds want to Know?!!

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I even had an individual at work bring up this supposed fact and only the only recourse I could think of was why would you do it in the first place? I guess it would be a cheap alternative to a Caldwell Lead Sled! Enquiring minds want to Know?!!

 

one thing i do know is that by not allowing the gun to have some give is a good way to damage it. Some guys at the range have cracked their rifle stocks using the lead sled. All guns need some rearward movement because the energy has to go somewhere. If you want to hold you gun against a concerete wall and fire you run a risk of damage. I would like to meet the genius who thought of doing this, uhh on second guess I would not.

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thinking about this topic. If anything the Benelli inertia system will work because it requires energy to operate the system. it needs 180 kgm of kinetic energy for a 12 ga at minium. holding it against an unmoveable object will significantly increase that number. You probably would not damage an auto loader gas or inertia as the energy generated is used to operate the system. But on a pump or a rifle you can crack the stock. I saw it happen to a rifle when the lead sled had three 50lb bags of lead shot on it. in any event, it is a foolish thing to do to a fine firearm.

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i heard that if the gun doesn't move in a rearward motion the action will not cycle so people say light loads with hardly and recoil will not have enough rearward motion to cycle the action :confused:

 

My SB M-2 generally eats anything I put through it, but I "launched" some bird bangs and explosive rounds (very low recoil, they "lob" like a grenade launcher) and it's not enough to cycle it. Have to manually cycle it.

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In a recent posting, it was mentioned that one disadvantage of the inertia system is that if fired while holding the gun against a concrete wall, the action will not cycle. Is this just internet rumor, or has someone actually tried it?

 

Could anyone please explain to me why I would care if my M-2 will not cycle while holding it against a concrete wall, or any other immovable object? I don't mean to sound like a smart**s, but can anyone give me a possible scenario when this "fact" might be of any importance to anyone? Curious minds would like to know!

The only cycling problems I have ever had in an inertia gun were from 5/8oz 20ga loads to break in my son - not the gun. Of course it was the boy who had the final laugh when he then picked up Grandpa's 12ga and started blasting away. There's a smart**s.:rolleyes:

 

You could always find some poor Doolie and borrow his gun to do some experimenting. Hate for you to scratch your own........:D

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