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onebarrelonedog

question about guns for high-volume shooting

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Hey all, quick question:

 

I notice the Cordoba, Super Sport, and Sport II are touted as the best guns for clays/"high volume" shooting. I was wondering - is this just marketing, or is there really some substance behind this? In other words, is there some sort of higher durability that the above-mentioned guns have in the clays/high volume shooting arena? Will an M2 or Montefeltro break down before one of the above if I'm a guy who runs through a lot of ammo on the clays range?

 

Thanks for the help. I apologize for asking the question several ways....I just want to make sure I'm clear as I haven't seem to come across a clear answer online. I've a bit of experience with shotguns, and my inclination is there is no special extra durability, etc., but Benelli's an inovative company...maybe they've done something I'm unaware of....

Edited by onebarrelonedog

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Guest cleefurd

A marginal design, WILL provide 90% reliability for the life of the owner, if the gun is exceedingly well made....

 

A flawless design, WOULD provide 100% reliability for the life of its most shoddy part, commensurate to how poorly it is made....

 

The latter will evolve into junk, the former will be esteemed "predictable" with potential.

 

The highly regarded guns you mentioned (barring any insurmountable design flaw) are crafted by stringent metalurgy, foundry, forge, tempering, mill, and file applied sufficient that they will outlast and ultimately OUTPERFORM a better design made from melted down pots and pans.

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I apologize, but I'm not quite sure exactly what your answer to my issue is.... does the Cordoba, Super Sport, or Sport II have some sort of inherent ability to better hold up to lots and lots of shooting that the M2 and others simply don't have?

 

for instance, the Cordoba is touted as Benelli's high volume shooting gun...Argentina dove hunting, etc....is there anything to that, or would other Benelli's last just as long hunting doves, putting hundreds of rounds through the gun every day, etc.

 

I am interested in a gun that can hold up to several hundred rounds of shooting a week in various clays sports. I've never had a Benelli, but it seems they're all quite durable. But if the Cordoba, SS, SII are better in that regard, I'll spend the extra and get one of those.

 

Thanks, and I apologize if I am not being clear enough :/ .

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What cleefurd is saying is that any of the Benelli's you mentioned are all quality pieces of machinery ,and are more then capable of doing what your asking. No machine is 100% perfect but the odds favor the Benelli's to hold up better then most other brands.

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I notice the Cordoba, Super Sport, and Sport II are touted as the best guns for clays/"high volume" shooting. I was wondering - is this just marketing, or is there really some substance behind this? In other words, is there some sort of higher durability that the above-mentioned guns have in the clays/high volume shooting arena? Will an M2 or Montefeltro break down before one of the above if I'm a guy who runs through a lot of ammo on the clays range?

 

I think I know what you are asking about.

 

We all know that Benellis are well made guns. I think you are asking what specifically makes them so useful in high-volume situations.

 

Have you done any high-volume shooting? I have done a little with Benellis in Mexico and I do see that many outfitters use Benellis for a variety of reasons. I have heard of some M1 20's going 500,000+ rounds.

 

One thing is reliability. No plugs - extended mags - the Benellis tend to go pop when you pull the trigger. If you are going to shoot 3000-6000+ dove in one day, think of how much better it is to reload a semi-auto versus an O/U. But watch out for the semi-auto loading thumb!

 

Cleaning. Benellis are pretty easy for some outfitters to disassemble and clean. The places I go just use a compressor to blow out crud, swab with a Tico tool, add a little oil, and the gun is ready to go again. I've seen some places actually disassmble them and dunk the frames, then blow out with the compressor.

 

Parts. Very few problem parts with Benellis. Maybe change the recoil spring every now and then? Maybe replace an ejector/extractor on occasion? I've got a 20 y.o. SBE that looks almost new. A little wear in the ejection area, but nothing too bad.

 

It's a combination of things that makes the Benelli a good high volume gun. I hear good things about other brands too for high volume; Beretta gas autos, some O/U that are easy to maintain, etc.

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Thanks for the answers, guys. I understand the Benellies are all very durable. I'm just wondering if the Cordobas and others that are touted as high volume shooters with Benelli's website descriptions are any more capable of the long shooting sessions than, say, an M2?

 

Mudhen seemed to answer it though by mentioning the M1 going the distance. Basically the question was, if I'm going to do exceedingly large amounts of shooting, and I'm going to buy a Benelli, will a Cordoba outlast a M2 when it comes to high-volume shoots?

 

Thanks for the help, everyone.

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Thanks for the answers, guys. I understand the Benellies are all very durable. I'm just wondering if the Cordobas and others that are touted as high volume shooters with Benelli's website descriptions are any more capable of the long shooting sessions than, say, an M2?

 

Mudhen seemed to answer it though by mentioning the M1 going the distance. Basically the question was, if I'm going to do exceedingly large amounts of shooting, and I'm going to buy a Benelli, will a Cordoba outlast a M2 when it comes to high-volume shoots?

 

Thanks for the help, everyone.

 

No.

 

The clay guns are not any more durable or better built than the others, they are just designed with features that aid in target shooting.

 

You should buy a gun built for the type of shooting you want to do, and then whatever gun you choose will be solid and durable for the long run.

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