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yobdab

Skeet shooter for 9 year old girl

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My daughter has expressed an interest in skeet shooting. She already is good with an air rifle, so I think she would really enjoy Youth Sport Shooting. I was thinking 20 ga.

 

What would be best? O/U or Pump?

Which brand / model?

 

I was looking at the Mossberg Intl Silver Reserve Bantam for $560.00

 

Any help would be appreciated. Thanks.

Edited by yobdab

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With a 9 year girl who has not shot skeet yet, but is enthusiastic .... don't by any gun until she tries one.

 

Any way to get a loaner for her to try ; borrow from a friend, a shelf model from a club gun, etc. will answer your question better.

 

Any 20 gauge, 28 gauge, .410 that she can try with light loads {example 20Gauge=7/8oz, #9: 28Gg= 5/8oz #9; .410 2-1/2"shell 1/2ounce , #9 ... the light ammo's are VERY important} will save you money and maybe get her far more interested than if you take a chance that a gun you buy will fit her comfort zone.

 

Take her advise on what she likes from what she has shot, and let her pick the gun and gauge in your price range. New or used.

 

Mistake to buy a gun for a kid and they don't feel comfortable shooting it. Best gun to buy is the one the kid will joyfully practice with because they truly want to.

 

With today's' kids, you got to let them try it before you buy it.

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An O/U is better but not necessarily for a 9 year old girl because they are generally heavier. Don't get a mossberg O/U for high volume shooting like trap the firing pins break oh so easily I have seen it happen more than once, and start reading some reviews and they will confirm this. Maybe a semi auto light weight auto loader with a reliable and good reputation? A pump might be a problem for her because after a long day of doubles her arm might get tired.

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16 July 09

 

The problem you are going to have is finding a gun short enough for your daughter,light enough for her to support and low enough in the recoil department that it doesn't scare her off.

 

A lot of the youth stocked guns are still too heavy for kids that age to hold properly. I'd look for a Franchi 620 or 720 with a 24" barrel and youth stock. They are light enough for a child to hold and short enough to fit. The gas operated system will help reduce recoil. You can load or buy 3/4 oz 20 ga shells and reduce the recoil even further. The 3/4 oz load will throw enough shot so she'll hit more targets then she would with a 1/2 oz out of a 410 and hitting targets keeps them interested. Besides, 28s and 410 are expensive to feed unless you reload for them.

 

If she continues, you can always get an adult stock for the gun when she's tall enough and mover her up to a 7/8 oz load when she can manage the extra recoil.

 

Some people worry about training a child on an auto and opt for a single barrel. An auto is a single shot as long as dad only give the puple 1 shell at a time. In truth, they are safer then a single shot with an exposed hammer

 

DumbDuck

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I always recommend a Remington 1187 Sportsman youth model as a good starter gun.

 

Short barrel, short stock, and very, very light on recoil.

 

DO NOT get one of those single shot hammer guns. They're responsible for a lot of kids never wanting to shoot another shotgun for the rest of their lives.

 

For young kids, recoil is an absolute fun-killer.

 

Also, try to find a way for her to break some exceptionally easy targets. Miss after miss after miss is also a major fun-killer.

 

Just pulling the trigger and going bang doesn't stay fun for very long. They need to see targets break, otherwise, they'll never come back. If you can find someone with a remote control target thrower, and land to use it on, a target that is thrown towards them, and kind of hovers for a brief moment just 15 or 20 feet above and in front of the shooter, is a great way to get started.

 

The 1187 is not cheap, and is difficult to find "used." But, even if you buy it for her and she decides that the shooting sports is not her thing, you won't lose a bunch of money on it. Their resale is pretty good. Also, if she grows out of this gun, you can put an adult stock and a standard length barrel on it. This gun, if cared for, will still be working when she has kids.

 

Now, that being said, unless she is a physically big girl, AND exceptionally responsible and bright, I believe 9 is a little young for shotgun sports.

 

I started my daughter at age 11. That was early enough for her. Any younger thatn that, and as a father, I don't believe she would have been ready.

 

You'll have to assess that for yourself.

 

Listen to them. If they want to stop, accept that and move on. DON'T PUSH!

 

Good luck

Edited by timb99

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My daughter has expressed an interest in skeet shooting. She already is good with an air rifle, so I think she would really enjoy Youth Sport Shooting. I was thinking 20 ga.

 

What would be best? O/U or Pump?

Which brand / model?

 

I was looking at the Mossberg Intl Silver Reserve Bantam for $560.00

 

Any help would be appreciated. Thanks.

 

 

For skeet, I would get a O/U. 20 gauge in fine. I've heard good thing about the mossberg.

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For skeet, I would get a O/U. 20 gauge in fine. I've heard good thing about the mossberg.

Don't get a mossberg O/U it looks great and seems like a steal, but it isn't a high volume gun. I was seriously considering it, and asked my trap coach what he thought of it. He said, "My son over there started out last year with a brand new Mossberg silver reserve and it didn't even make it through the first season without the firing pins breaking." And you can't get better quality firing pins for it, only stock pins. A firing pin could break in the middle of a shoot and cause you to use a back up gun that you haven't practiced with. The Mossberg is a steal for regular shooting, but not for any type of high volume shooting like trap or skeet.

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Don't get a mossberg O/U it looks great and seems like a steal, but it isn't a high volume gun. I was seriously considering it, and asked my trap coach what he thought of it. He said, "My son over there started out last year with a brand new Mossberg silver reserve and it didn't even make it through the first season without the firing pins breaking." And you can't get better quality firing pins for it, only stock pins. A firing pin could break in the middle of a shoot and cause you to use a back up gun that you haven't practiced with. The Mossberg is a steal for regular shooting, but not for any type of high volume shooting like trap or skeet.

 

Huh, My friend has one with thousands of rounds through it from skeet shooting. I have a Remington spr-310 O/U (regular shooting gun.) and I put about 100 rounds a week through it. Have for 3 years now.

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Huh, My friend has one with thousands of rounds through it from skeet shooting. I have a Remington spr-310 O/U (regular shooting gun.) and I put about 100 rounds a week through it. Have for 3 years now.

Remingtons almost never go wrong but 1000 rounds is nothing, My super nova I have had for about 4 months has 2700 rounds through it, and I didn't even shoot ata this year, only game and fish. But your friends gun will probably fail in another 1000 rounds at the least. During trap season I put at least 200 usually 250 to 300 a week just in practice.

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My friend has one with thousandS of rounds through it.

 

Remingtons almost never go wrong but 1000 rounds is nothing, My super nova I have had for about 4 months has 2700 rounds through it, and I didn't even shoot ata this year, only game and fish. But your friends gun will probably fail in another 1000 rounds at the least. During trap season I put at least 200 usually 250 to 300 a week just in practice.

 

 

Where did you read 1000 rounds? He shoots skeet with me. 100 rounds every week. In bought the gun the day it came out.

 

The Spr I have is a russia made O/U (imported my Remington). Its cheaper than the mossberg. Really. My point is, she will shoot it for a few years and upgrade like almost everyone else. I started on a Charles daly ( 190.00 bucks) and upgraded to the nova a year later.

Edited by Novaking

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Where did you read 1000 rounds? He shoots skeet with me. 100 rounds every week. In bought the gun the day it came out.

 

The Spr I have is a russia made O/U (imported my Remington). Its cheaper than the mossberg. Really. My point is, she will shoot it for a few years and upgrade like almost everyone else. I started on a Charles daly ( 190.00 bucks) and upgraded to the nova a year later.

Thanks for capitalizing the S. Maybe I am dyslexic. Maybe your friend is lucky but the gun is probably a time bomb. Google Mossberg silver reserve firing pin problems. It is not a big deal to replace your firing pins but they could break in a shoot and ruin your score.

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Thanks for capitalizing the S. Maybe I am dyslexic. Maybe your friend is lucky but the gun is probably a time bomb. Google Mossberg silver reserve firing pin problems. It is not a big deal to replace your firing pins but they could break in a shoot and ruin your score.

 

 

Your welcome!:rolleyes:

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Take a look at the scaled down Franchi 20ga & the (unfortunately regular lop) 28ga guns. A lightweight gas operated 28 ga would be tough to beat for a young girl. An argument can be made for the 20ga over growing into it, but if was my little girl I'd seriously consider the 28 & look into a spare buttstock as she grows with the gun (along with the newer recoil absorbent pads).

 

Quite a few makers use a scaled down reciever on the 28ga also.

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Take a look at the scaled down Franchi 20ga & the (unfortunately regular lop) 28ga guns. A lightweight gas operated 28 ga would be tough to beat for a young girl. An argument can be made for the 20ga over growing into it, but if was my little girl I'd seriously consider the 28 & look into a spare buttstock as she grows with the gun (along with the newer recoil absorbent pads).

 

Quite a few makers use a scaled down reciever on the 28ga also.

I agree but in Arkansas you have to use a 12 or 20 nothing else, but I would get the 20 regardless. A gas operated 20 with 3/4 oz target loads shouldn't hurt her. 20 is cheaper and easier to find.

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I agree but in Arkansas you have to use a 12 or 20 nothing else, but I would get the 20 regardless. A gas operated 20 with 3/4 oz target loads shouldn't hurt her. 20 is cheaper and easier to find.

 

I agree. unless you reload, 28 gauge is hard to find.

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