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beamernc

M1 vs. M2

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What are the main differences between the M1 and M2 shotguns? I know the stock/forearm and trigger guard are different. Also are the barrels interchangeable?

 

Thanks

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I don't see how having the M4 would help me in the dove field or in the deer woods.

 

I have a HK Benelli M1 S90 and my son just got a M2 and I wanted to know what the differences were and if the barrels were interchangable.

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I don't see how having the M4 would help me in the dove field or in the deer woods.

 

I have a HK Benelli M1 S90 and my son just got a M2 and I wanted to know what the differences were and if the barrels were interchangable.

 

I don't think ANYTHING interchanges on these except maybe the "small parts".

 

However, my M4 has taken birds on the wing and sligns buckshot with precision. Hunt on! :D

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I don't see how having the M4 would help me in the dove field or in the deer woods.

i can hit an 8" paper plate at a 100 yds with a rifled slug standing free form all day long. so deer should be verwy afwaid of an M4!!:D and if you havent noticed by now, i tell EVERYONE to buy an M4!!:)

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The M1's have more steel parts, the trigger guard being the most obvious. It is a solid but well balanced gun; it seems heavier when handled, but the real weight difference between M1s and M2s is not that great.

 

The M1 allows release of shotgun shells manually from the magazine carrier using your finger or thumb, negating the need to cycle rounds through the action to empty the gun.

 

This is not possible with the M2s and in my opinion is the only drawback to an M2. The M1s, Ultralights and Vincis, etc., have all been engineered to allow easy magazine ejection.

 

However the M2 is a solid gun with tremendous balance-- the 20 gauge is especially sweet.

 

I use my M1 for turkey and ducks; it's going strong after 15 hard (read MN SD ND MT winter) seasons.

 

The M2 is a great pheasant gun. In 20 gauge, it would be wicked-good for grouse or quail.

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Guest McDaddy

Would not take for my M1! I haven't had it long, but it shoots and handles better than my Monte or Legacy.

Benellis.jpg

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The barrel in criogenically treated which should give you a little better shot pattern, the M2 will have less recoil b/c of the chevrons, the choke tubes are longer which will also help your shot pattern. The M2 is a much better gun and the barrels are not interchageable.

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The barrel in criogenically treated which should give you a little better shot pattern, the M2 will have less recoil b/c of the chevrons, the choke tubes are longer which will also help your shot pattern. The M2 is a much better gun and the barrels are not interchageable.

Nonsense that crio treatment isn't going to do much for a shotgun and the chevrons are there more for than looks then recoil reduction and you cant feel any difference. I do however like the chokes better the main reason being the threads are easier to reach because they are closer to the end of the barrel. Also it comes with 2 more chokes. The M2 has shims, and a takedown case. It is better but not that much.

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The M2 is a much better gun and the barrels are not interchageable.

 

What do you base your answer on? I have been wondering about this since I have been looking for another 21 inch barrel for one of my M1's. I went down to the local gun shop and tried fitting an M2 barrel to my M1 receiver. It fit just fine and the action cycled normally. The only difference I can see in the two barrels is a small downward nub on the back end of the extension into the receiver. That cleared the bolt with no problems.

Edited by truckcop

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The barrel in criogenically treated which should give you a little better shot pattern, the M2 will have less recoil b/c of the chevrons, the choke tubes are longer which will also help your shot pattern. The M2 is a much better gun and the barrels are not interchageable.

 

This is very debatable. Nigel Teague feels that more than 2" of taper is not needed, and parallel's are over-rated. His chokes have non, and he only makes extended chokes because they are popular. The results of his products in the field speaks for itself, however, I am not sure how they will do with buckshot and plan on testing one soon if he says they are G2G with it.

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Most people I've spoken with would trade a newer model (SBE2/M2) for a Super 90 any day of the week. Don't know what it is but they swear the older guns were made better and would take the functionality of the M1 over the chevrons and crio barrels available on the newer products. Find a good used M1 and you won't be sorry IMHO

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All the barrel talk is nonsense I could hand you a crio treated barrel and one that isn't and you couldn't tell me which was which. When it comes to M1 vs M2 barrels all one need to worry about is fixed choke vs interchangeable to be quite honest I prefer a fixed.

As for build quality besides a plastic trigger guard on the M2 versus the M1's steel one whats left to be built better?

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All the barrel talk is nonsense I could hand you a crio treated barrel and one that isn't and you couldn't tell me which was which. When it comes to M1 vs M2 barrels all one need to worry about is fixed choke vs interchangeable to be quite honest I prefer a fixed.

 

As for build quality besides a plastic trigger guard on the M2 versus the M1's steel one whats left to be built better?

 

Some testing has been done on cryo-treated steel and durability. I remember reading it years ago and cannot provide citation, but it was found that cryo-treated steel doesn't necessarily last any longer, sometimes not as long.

 

Also,a properly heat-relieved barrel (if it is button or hammer forged, this means both before and after rifling, if it is cut, this means stress relief before rifling and not needed after as no stress is placed on the barrel) won't gain much from cryo treatment. A poorly heat-treated/relieved barrel might see some benefit.

 

As relates to shotguns, I think it is a very valuable operation--It adds value to the company's stock when it sells. My M4S90 is no bird-gun, but even it slings perfectly round patterns with birdshot. I don't know WHERE or HOW Benelli achieved those skewed patterns they show in their cryo vs. non cryo treatment comparison picture.

Edited by Unobtanium

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Thats kind of what I was getting to but figured further explaination was a bit much. When it comes to barrels be it centerfire rifles or shotguns the heat treatment is much more important than crio treatment.

To me it's kind of like companies selling tires that increase gas mileage but not telling you how they do it. To those who know it's easy to see that they are just looking for a sucker.

When it comes down to it the plastic trigger guard on the M2 is as much reason not to buy it as crio treated parts is a reason to buy it.

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