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Magazine Operation/Removal


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Armed with the knowledge I have obtained in recent weeks, quite a bit of it from this forum, I will be removing the magazine tube from my M4 tomorrow.

 

I have an IR thermometer, padding for the vice grip, plumbers strap in case my wrists give out, acetone, brushes, welders gloves, etc.

 

Any opinions as to the use of loctite when I install the new tube?

 

 

thanks,

Edited by garnok
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Armed with the knowledge I have obtained in recent weeks, quite a bit of it from this forum, I will be removing the magazine tube from my M4 tomorrow.

 

I have an IR thermometer, padding for the vice grip, plumbers strap in case my wrists give out, acetone, brushes, welders gloves, etc.

 

Any opinions as to the use of loctite when I install the new tube?

 

 

thanks,

 

I opted not to use any. Kip recommends just a drop of blue medium strength loc-tite IF you choose to use any. I figure if I did have any problem with it loosening up (which I don't anticipate) it wouldn't be a problem to unscrew it and add a drop of the loctite.

 

Here's a copy of Kip's instructions which address this at the end just in case you don't have them:

 

This is "cut-n-paste" from our Gunbroker.com listing, in case you ordered from our online store where directions have not yet been uploaded. Sorry to leave you hanging. Hope this helps;

 

 

Tools required;

> Heat gun.(Refrain from using flame devices, torches, etc., they are overkill and have the potential of discoloring the finish on the receiver)

> Snap ring pliers.

>Stiff nylon or brass bristled tooth-brush, Q-tips and acetone.

> Rubber grip pad. (Similar to a jar lid gripper, or even a piece of tire inner tube)

>Padded vise. (not required but helpful if done alone without an assistant)

 

Before proceeding please ensure the firearm is completely unloaded, clear mag tube and chamber, firearm on safe.

 

Lock the bolt to the rear, then remove the factory barrel nut (by hand), set the barrel, bolt group, and handguards to the side. Using snap ring pliers set to compress when gripped, carefully remove the spring retainer from the end of the factory mag tube, (keep it aimed away from your face, with your other hand over the end so that the spring can be safely contained when it is "set free"). Then tilt the gun downwards, allowing the spring and follower to fall out. Place gun in a lightly clamped padded vise (ensuring the bolt release button is not clamped), between your knees, or in the hands of a competent assistant. Using the heat gun set to a maximum 400 F, apply direct heat to the full circumference of the mag tube where it meets the receiver, allowing heat to reach the receiver as well, continue rotating the heat around the junction until the two are beyond unbearable to touch (using an infra-red thermometer if available, you will typically see results when the receiver temp nears 250F), favor application of heat to the receiver, as it retains heat more efficiently. At that temp (around 250F) you should be able to begin twisting the factory tube off [ccw](here's where the rubber grip pad does double duty as a heat shield, and provides much better grip than bare hands). Do not use a pipe wrench for a few reasons, 1st it will damage your factory tube, but foremost it will provide excessive torque that may allow you to force removal before the loc-tite is ready to let go. Once it starts to turn, the battle is won, just keep it turning until it is free. Next clean the internal threads with acetone, Q-tips, and the nylon or brass tooth brush. It will look scary at 1st since the residue from the factory loc-tite is chalky white, but once you have it all cleaned off, you should be looking at the pristine black anodized receiver threads where the old tube use to be. You are now ready to install your replacement tube. Don't forget to transfer the handguard's stamped steel rear brace onto the new tube BEFORE threading it into the receiver, it is a "captured part" that has to be in place during assembly. Most people opt to fore-go the use of loc-tite, simply torqing in their new tube as tight as can be done by hand. If you use loc-tite, make sure you check the data sheet, and select a grade that can be heated for removal with LOW HEAT like the factory used. Typically just a drop of medium strength Loc-Tite brand "blue" will be sufficient if you use any at all. Replace all the remaining components, and enjoy!!

__________________

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I didn't bother with locktite when I installed the new magazine tube. I just tightened it firmly by both hands while the receiver was in the vice. 500 - 1000 rounds later and half a dozen disassemblies later, it hasn't moved.

 

Locktite won't hurt to use, but sometimes it is nice having the option to remove the magazine tube for more detailed cleanings.

 

Also, surface IR readings may not be the same as what the temperature around the threads are. A heatgun has almost no chance of causing damage. So cook it till it unscrews by hand. It'll break free an eith of a turn then stop. Add more heat and repeat until it is removed.

 

I don't like the strap wrench because it will give you enough torsional twisting power to twist the aluminum receiver. No action blocks are available, so you must use caution when applying torque.

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Locktite won't hurt to use, but sometimes it is nice having the option to remove the magazine tube for more detailed cleanings.

 

Another reason I opted for no Loc-tite is that if I chose to install the GG&G bolt release pad, it looked like it might be slightly easier to deal with the little spring that sits behind the lever if you could access it throught the hole that the mag tube occupies. As well as detailed cleanings like if it got dunked in water etc.

 

Later,

 

Hookster :)

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jeez. Just use a cheap heat-gun and your hands. This is being overthought. When you have sex do you calculate the consistancy of the condom with a durometer, or do you just put the damn thing on?

 

My durometer is in the shop for it's monthly calibration :D

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cleanings.

 

. A heatgun has almost no chance of causing damage. So cook it till it unscrews by hand. It'll break free an eith of a turn then stop. Add more heat and repeat until it is removed.

 

 

I have the camo M4 will the heat gun mess with the film on the camo ones? Or am I safe to heat away? thanks for your time.

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My durometer is in the shop for it's monthly calibration :D

 

I was wondering if the same basic process is the same for the replacement of the recoil tube on an M1014. Is the "loctite" the same as used on the mag tube? Same melting temperatures?

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As for the camo finish, I would be careful. I never handled one, so I'm not sure if it is paint or a film. I'd pull the trigger group and direct the heat at the old magazine tube so the hot air is blowing down the pipe. This will heat mostly the inside of the receiver.

 

Chances are, the finish would be fine to heat like normal, but I would use caution and use only enough. Kip would probably be able to give a difinitive answer on the camo's heat resistance.

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I was reading a thread dated "Successful SOCOM Guy Mag Swap" dated 12/30/2008 where the guy removed the mag from a camo model without damaging the finsih. I would paste it here but not sure how to do it.

 

Here's the text of the post:

 

Hi cop1211,

 

I received my full length magazine tube for my M4 from SOCOMguy yesterday December 26th. By using a Milwaukee 1200 watt heat gun and aiming it at the base of the tube and receiver for about two minutes it loosened the factory Locktite stuff. It was still a bit difficult to turn but I wanted to use as little heat as I could.

The end of the factory tube and receiver were still very hot to the touch even after only 2 minutes of exposure. My M4 wears the Desert Camo which was not affected at all by the heat. After assembly with the full length mag tube and factoy spring (but without using any new Locktite) I did a manual function check using dummy 12 gauge shells. I encountered no malfunctions at all. I even tried loading one on the shell lifter and that functioned flawlessly; but again this was all manual testing I’ll post a range report of the live fire testing.

I also found a guy who will Dura Coat the new mag tube to match the Benelli Desert Camo pattern.

 

Cheers,

Mick

 

 

Here's the link to the thread (it's post #10)

 

http://www.benelliusa.com/forum/showthread.php?t=17497&highlight=socom+mag+swap

 

Later,

 

Hookster :)

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Well that was easy. I ended up using a Milwaukee heat gun (1200w) using the low setting till the area warmed to around 160 then turned it on high until the area hit 250 or so. I did have a borrowed ir thermometer and the mag was easy to turn at that temperature. The mag tube was not very hot at the end and I did not need to use gloves for protection or friction on the mag tube to twist it off.

 

Thanks for all the advice. Worked out great. I will be giving it a good cleaning now that it is broken down.

 

Anyone know at what temp the loctite will break free for the recoil tube on a 1014?

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