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Pistol Grip or regular stock for a shotgun class?

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If you had the choice for a training course (tactica in nature) would you run a pistol grip or field stock?

 

I can't help but feel more comfortable with the field stock, but the PG has some unique handling characteristics when it comes to one hand manipulations.

 

Just curious, I'd like to get some training on my shotgun before the end of the year.

 

Drew

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Cool. Did you notice any considerable advantage to the PG verses the dudes in the class with regular stocks? Thanks-

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If you had the choice for a training course (tactica in nature) would you run a pistol grip or field stock?

 

I can't help but feel more comfortable with the field stock, but the PG has some unique handling characteristics when it comes to one hand manipulations.

 

Just curious, I'd like to get some training on my shotgun before the end of the year.

 

Drew

 

I would run which ever configuration you plan to keep the shotgun in - wouldn't change the set up for a class; each has some advantages I think - one hand manipulation, different grip angles/strength requirement - for me, the pistol grip provides more grip and control - YMMV

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I agree with Tactical1. Whatever you plan on keeping on the gun is what you should train with.

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That makes sense. I enjoy both stocks a lot, they are both comfortable. I will have to play a bit more at the range before landing on one or the other.

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Train like you'll fight and then you'll fight like you've trained.

 

Ya don't reckon a single shot 28ga with an English stock will work for class? :p

 

I personally have found the only "downside" to a PG is ability to snag on equipment/vest/clothing because it's so grippy.

 

Have fun in class!! A tactical-esque shotty class would be a hoot!

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Way back in 1986, I took part in a Police Academy, Police Shotgun qualification class. I was using a H&K imported M1 S90 by Benelli in Defense/Police Configuration. That means pistol grip, all black, plain rifle sights and 7+1+1 capacity. Nobody on the line, including the instructors had ever heard of Benelli before and after a few minutes trying to explain the inertia system, I gave up. All the other shotguns were Remy and a few Winchester pumps.

 

Not sure how many practise rounds we fired but by the time "qualifications" were due, I was starting to get a very sore right hand. Also by then about 6 of the pump shotguns had broken down and other officers, from various towns, were borrowing shotguns from each other.

 

Then came qualifications. I was hanging onto that rubber pistol grip like my life depended on it. We shot 00 buckshot first, both standing and then advancing on the man sized targets with serveral reloads. My target had all the holes in the main body. Next came rifled slugs. 10 rounds in a fire/reload/fire exercise at one given distance. My head and jaw were still buzzing a little from all the 00 buckshot rounds.

 

The range went hot and the whistle blew. I loaded, aimed and fired. We went 4 rounds, 4 rounds then 2 rounds. On the last 2 rounds my eyes were starting to water but I was still gripping that pistol grip tightly. I finished with all ten slugs into the inner circle on the target.

 

For a woman not used to firing full load 12 guage shells, about 50 in under one hour, this was brutal. I don't think I could have finished the course if I had a field stock to grip. During the afternoon shoot, I loaned my Benelli to many other recruits as so many of the pumps had broken down. Everybody loved the pistol grip. Only one other shotgun with a pistol grip (and folding stock) was avilable. The rest were standard short barrel pumps, many with hard plastic butt plates. At the end of the day, their were a lot of sore police cadets.

 

In case anybody is interested, my Benelli didn't have one single burp of any kind that entire day or at any time over the next many years. Oh Ya, my vote goes to the pistol grip design for combat/police work.

 

My guess is that at a civilian shotgun course, you will be firing a lot more 12 guage shells that I did. Use a pistol grip and if allowed a shooting glove (finger tips cut away). Have fun.

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I much prefer the pistol grip over the field stock. Like many other posts indicated I like to train with what I plan to use in the real world.

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There was a lot of reall good information in that post! Thanks for sharing some real experience that was clearly expressed and right on point.

 

I was going to just change to the field stock (something about old dogs and new tricks) but now I believe I'll give the PG a fair try. I will say that the M4 PG is the most comfortable PG I have ever tried.

 

Thanks again!

 

Way back in 1986, I took part in a Police Academy, Police Shotgun qualification class. I was using a H&K imported M1 S90 by Benelli in Defense/Police Configuration. That means pistol grip, all black, plain rifle sights and 7+1+1 capacity. Nobody on the line, including the instructors had ever heard of Benelli before and after a few minutes trying to explain the inertia system, I gave up. All the other shotguns were Remy and a few Winchester pumps.

 

Not sure how many practise rounds we fired but by the time "qualifications" were due, I was starting to get a very sore right hand. Also by then about 6 of the pump shotguns had broken down and other officers, from various towns, were borrowing shotguns from each other.

 

Then came qualifications. I was hanging onto that rubber pistol grip like my life depended on it. We shot 00 buckshot first, both standing and then advancing on the man sized targets with serveral reloads. My target had all the holes in the main body. Next came rifled slugs. 10 rounds in a fire/reload/fire exercise at one given distance. My head and jaw were still buzzing a little from all the 00 buckshot rounds.

 

The range went hot and the whistle blew. I loaded, aimed and fired. We went 4 rounds, 4 rounds then 2 rounds. On the last 2 rounds my eyes were starting to water but I was still gripping that pistol grip tightly. I finished with all ten slugs into the inner circle on the target.

 

For a woman not used to firing full load 12 guage shells, about 50 in under one hour, this was brutal. I don't think I could have finished the course if I had a field stock to grip. During the afternoon shoot, I loaned my Benelli to many other recruits as so many of the pumps had broken down. Everybody loved the pistol grip. Only one other shotgun with a pistol grip (and folding stock) was avilable. The rest were standard short barrel pumps, many with hard plastic butt plates. At the end of the day, their were a lot of sore police cadets.

 

In case anybody is interested, my Benelli didn't have one single burp of any kind that entire day or at any time over the next many years. Oh Ya, my vote goes to the pistol grip design for combat/police work.

 

My guess is that at a civilian shotgun course, you will be firing a lot more 12 guage shells that I did. Use a pistol grip and if allowed a shooting glove (finger tips cut away). Have fun.

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Depends on the gun I'm using. I used my M4 with PG stock in a Magpul Dynamics shotgun class as did Chris Costa. We also used pump shotguns as well. Mostly Moss 500 and Rem 870s. On the Remington 870 I prefer the standard field stock as its easier to engage the forend release. The pump guns were much easier to manipulate single and double slug drills. If your running the m4 bring both. They are simple enough to change out in the field. Try them both and see what works best for you.

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Depends on the gun I'm using. I used my M4 with PG stock in a Magpul Dynamics shotgun class as did Chris Costa. We also used pump shotguns as well. Mostly Moss 500 and Rem 870s. On the Remington 870 I prefer the standard field stock as its easier to engage the forend release. The pump guns were much easier to manipulate single and double slug drills. If your running the m4 bring both. They are simple enough to change out in the field. Try them both and see what works best for you.

 

 

I agree, I had a pistol grip stock but have sold it now in favor of running a standard stock. Sure the PG looks cool, but for me, the standard stock points better and gets my sights on target a bit quicker as well. FWIW, my M1s90 didn't like to run as reliably with the PG verses the standard stock... never could figure it out, all other things were equal on the same gun.

 

FWIW, once you learn to "push pull" the gun aka "Stretch" the shotgun the M1 is a treat to shoot.

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I like PGs, & here's "the Tip": you use the PG to pull the stock into your shoulder. Manymanymany people treat it like a big pistol with some funky appendage flailing against their chests. This beats you up. Try that hold if you must, but for comfort and speed:

 

1) Short LOP- 12" generally the max

2) Squared stance, with non-dom leg slightly forward. Lean into the gun.(Your instructor may have alternative advice- follow instructions, see how it feels.)

3) PULL that PG. Pretend that stock & PG are what you hold onto to be whisked to safety at 60 MPH.

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