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TennVol

M2 Tactical problems w/ ejection/feeding

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I recently purchased a new M2 tactical. The first trip to the range I fired 100 rounds of low brass dove loads. I had problems all day long with failure to eject and failure to feed. I have since read some owners have problems with low brass/low power loads. I have also read some owners recommend a break in period of several hundred rounds to ensure proper cycling with all loads.

 

I just returned from a very frustrating range trip and I fired 25 rounds of low brass dove loads and I also fired ten rounds of high brass, low recoil tactical 00 buck loads. Out of 35 rounds fired, only three rounds ejected/fed properly. And none of the ten 00 buck loads fed/ejected properly.

 

What's the deal? This is a $1200+ shotgun and after 135 rounds it still won't feed properly? I ensured I had a tight hold on the gun and it was pressed firmly into my shoulder. (I had a buddy observing me to see if I wasn't holding the gun properly). I wasn't trying to fire as fast possible. I was firing, then looking to see if the empty shell ejected before I tried to fire the next round. All of the spent hulls were hanging up after they cleared the chamber. Occassionaly, the spent hull would be ejected, but the fresh round would still be on the shell lifter and I would have to pull the bolt handle to get it into the chamber.

 

I realize the dove loads may be a little light But the ten rounds of 00 buck should have been no problem at all.

 

Is this something that needs to be addressed by Benelli? Did I get a lemon, or is this common? Also, after my last range session, I disassembled the gun per the manual and lubed it as instructed.

 

As mentioned before, I paid quite a bit for this gun and frankly I expected much, much more. My Mossberg 590A1 is looking better all the time!

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All of the spent hulls were hanging up after they cleared the chamber. Occassionaly, the spent hull would be ejected, but the fresh round would still be on the shell lifter and I would have to pull the bolt handle to get it into the chamber.

 

Are the ones that were held up on the lifter look anything like this?

 

http://www.benelliusa.com/forum/showthread.php?t=20660&page=5

(scroll down to the pictures)

 

What ended up being the issue there was the carrier latch was holding up the rounds and replacing the latch and spring solved the issue. So if your jams look anything like that the carrier latch is where I would start. Benelli CS is very good about sending parts to solve issues.

 

Any pictures you had of your jams would be helpful.

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I didn't remember to take my camera with me, so I don't have any photos of the jams.

 

Most of the spent shells are hanging up with about half of the shell sticking out of the ejection port, and the other half stuck inside the gun. There really isn't one consistent problem. Sometimes the spent shell is all the way inside the gun without ejecting, sometimes it is partially in the gun, and sometimes the shell will extract, but the fresh shell is on the shell elevator, but isn't fed into the chamber.

Edited by TennVol

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Benelli's inertia driven guns aren't designed for low recoil ammo like what you have used in your M2 so far. They require a certain amount of energy to operate unlike gas guns that just need gas pressure. In your manual is says that if you have trouble with low recoil ammo in a new gun you should put at least 75-100 rounds of "standard hunting" ammo through it. I'd recommend half a dozen boxes of 2 3/4 or 3 inch lead with at least 1 3/8 ounces of shot and high velocity. Magnum type stuff. "Low recoil" buck shot doesn't count. If you look at Benelli's M3 you'll see that it is changeable from semi to pump specifically for using low recoil type ammo.

I have two SBE's and neither has a problem with light loads but they also have a few thousand rounds of duck loads through them. On the other hand, my Ultralight has never had anything but dove loads in it with no problems.

So, put a bunch of serious loads through it and then see how it does.

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Most of the spent shells are hanging up with about half of the shell sticking out of the ejection port, and the other half stuck inside the gun. There really isn't one consistent problem. Sometimes the spent shell is all the way inside the gun without ejecting, sometimes it is partially in the gun, and sometimes the shell will extract, but the fresh shell is on the shell elevator, but isn't fed into the chamber.

 

That description especially the ones half in half out make it sound like a "low-power" issue. I admit that I didn't read closely enough the first time I answered to notice that the buckshot was also low-recoil.

 

So I revise and say to first follow Ducker's suggestion. Go get a few boxes of magnum buckshot/slugs. Put a good amount of your choice of oil/lube on the bolt carrier rails, area where the bolt goes into the bolt carrier, and the channels in the barrel where the bolt rotates. If those high-power rounds cycle correctly then it would seem some more lube/shoot is required before it will like the lower power rounds. If those high-power rounds still give you problems then there is probably something deeper going on. Take pictures and post them up.

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This afternoon I took my gun apart & cleaned/lubed everything. I paid particular attention to lubing the bolt, rails, & the recoil plunger assembly. I'll pick up 100 rounds of some heavier loads this week and run it through the gun and see what happens. I've got a few boxes of 3" magnum duck loads (steel) that I may run through it also. As I recall, those had a fairly hefty recoil and maybe they will help to break-in my gun.

 

I'm accustomed to using lube sparingly on my AR's because of how much dirt they seem to attract. How much lube do the Benelli's really need? Are we talking about dripping wet, or just a light sheen?

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I'm accustomed to using lube sparingly on my AR's because of how much dirt they seem to attract. How much lube do the Benelli's really need? Are we talking about dripping wet, or just a light sheen?

 

I would say wet during this heavy load period, but then you can taper off to the light sheen. I have a lot of rounds through my M2 and at this point I wipe the internals with an oil saturated rag and put a drop on the rails but thats it.

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