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tucker301

How Well Does Your Rifle Shoot?

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We could argue all day about whether 3 shots, 5 shots, or more are the appropriate number to truly identify the accuracy of a given rifle and shooter.

 

The fact is, in most hunting situations, one shot is all that's needed.

 

That's why I always end my range session with a single shot fired from a clean cold bore. That's the shot I want to hit its mark, whether it's a deer at 75 yards or a varmint at 400.

 

However, if you want a truly humbling shooting experience, take this target with you to the range and give it a go.

 

http://imgur.com/LSwmy.jpg

 

Post your results here, if you're not too embarrassed by them ;).

Edited by tucker301

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Those will be tough to see with my iron sights on the M14. I can try though! ;) I only have one scoped .22. Suppose I could try that @ 50 and 100??

 

You make a very valid point though Tucker!! I think to give the drill a tad more stress, add a time factor as well. Or, treat each line as a new series of "bad-guys."

 

Line 1 - 30 seconds.

 

Line 2 - 20 seconds.

 

Line 3 - 10 seconds.

 

Line 4 - all time you want.

 

What I've found is when you give someone "all the time they want", everything is overthought and they wait for the absolute alleged PERFECT conditions, but shoot a relatively large group.

 

I love all the games that can be played with shooting.

 

BTW. . . nice shooting Tucker! :)

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I am also wanting to try the target with each line at random distances from say 50 to 400 yards, having someone else set the distances and not give them to me.

 

Yeah, I thin 50 yards for a .22 would be more than fair.

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Here's my one and only try on the target.

I may make another run at this Fall.

 

target_7-8-09.jpg

I think that is good consistant shooting.

How did you shoot? prone?

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Bags on bench

thats cheating or zeroing in your scope/sights,lol

still consistant though.

someone needs to try that with the M4 and slugs to see if all the black dots disapear.

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MRP-Modern-07.jpg

MRP-Modern-08.jpg

 

I can get under MOA with 75 and 77 grain match ammo.

 

Impressive for a chrome lined.

 

That said, it's not at all set up / built to be a bench gun. I'd build a 20 inch 6.5 grendel stainless rifle for that, or buy an OBR.

 

I'll give this target a try next range trip.

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Here are respective groups from an accurized M16 rifle with a 18" full-heavy fluted Krieger SS barrel with CLE 5.56MM MATCH chamber firing a factory MK 262 MOD 0 type 77gr. SIERRA MATCHKING loading. 5 shot groups are the norm with a few shooters going to 10 shot groups when testing/developing loads. But light "pencil barrel" hunting rifles, especially magnums, heat up quickly so 3 shot groups give a good indication of hunting accuracy.

 

500yd. & 100yd. groups: 3.27" & 0.51"

LSA500yds327-100yds51.jpg

 

Here is a 77gr. SMK handload group at 750yds: 5.47"

 

77grSMKoverTAC750yds547.jpg

Edited by leid

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My house gun (rifle) needs to be able to hit a paper plate down the end of the hall, and my hunting rifle if it can hit the same plate at 200 yards is fine with me....

 

Do have a national match version of an M1A that is very accurate, but I don't care about group size as other than on the bench and maybe prone (if done right) field shooting and target shooting have very little in common...

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My house gun (rifle) needs to be able to hit a paper plate down the end of the hall, and I don't care about group size as other than on the bench and maybe prone (if done right) field shooting and target shooting have very little in common...

 

Exactly. Thats why I dont shoot paper anymore, unless its for rezeroing. I shoot bottles and clays most of the time. Shooting different sized objects at different ranges is alot more realistic and fun than punching holes in paper and it greatly improves speed, weapon handling ability and sight picture.

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My house gun (rifle) needs to be able to hit a paper plate down the end of the hall, and my hunting rifle if it can hit the same plate at 200 yards is fine with me....

 

 

Glad to hear it. This thread isn't for you.

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I consider punching paper from a bench to be akin to putting an engine on the dyno.

It gives you a performance baseline for the equipment.

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How did I know Tucker didn't shoot tha with an MR-1 or ANY Benelli for that matter. I think there is a site somewhere for Savage bolt guns. Lots of them showing up as the basis for multi 1000 dollar custom rifles.

Why the last time I visited Bernardsville they had them lined up for custom stocks, engraving and Schmidt & Benders. .... right ..... GRIN!

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I think there is a site somewhere for Savage bolt guns. Lots of them showing up as the basis for multi 1000 dollar custom rifles.

 

Savage rifles typically don't cost that much. They just out shoot the ones that cost that much.

 

http://www.savagearms.com/news/article/?id=1DoKxAoZh

 

savageteam_0003.jpg

 

Team Savage started its 2010 season in grand fashion, winning the F T/R National Championship team competition by besting all others in the 600 and 1,000 yard events, and establishing an new 1,000-yard record of 778-21X. That would seem hard to top. But that is exactly what they did at the last two major matches of their season.

Darrell Buell of Damascus, OR; John Weil of Welches, OR; Monte Milanuk of Wenatchee WA and Stan Pate of Milwaukie, OR wrapped up the season with two internationally sanctioned matches: the Canadian International Fullbore Championships held in Chilliwack. B.C. and the Pacific International Fullbore Championships held just outside of Portland, OR. At these matches, elite shooters from around the world compete at 800, 900 and 1,000 yards. The two matches combined constitute a “Super Aggregate”, or continental title.

Team Savage loaded up on the hardware at both matches, winning multiple medals at the various distances. They captured the team gold at the Canadian match and Gold and Silver in the individual Super Aggregate.

The real fireworks happened in the Oregon match. With John Weil leading the way, Team Savage put on a veritable clinic. This competition was held on Weil and Pate’s home range at the Douglass Ridge Rifle Club and they showed everybody that nobody knows how to read the conditions on that range better than Team Savage. Weil won all seven gold medals available, while teammate Stan Pate won six silvers. Monte Milanuk added three bronzes. Weil also shot a new national record at 1000 yards, scoring 148-4x.

Edited by tucker301

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