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Urbino stock versus Benelli collapsible stock.


nohadji
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The Urbino is 2" shorter than the M4 Stock (for both fully extended collapsible or regular full size).

 

The LOP on the Urbino is 12.5"

 

The LOP on the collapsible stock is 9.5", 12.5", and 14.5" (roughly). The LOP on the full size M4 pistol grip stock is 14.5"

 

If my numbers are wrong, feel free to correct me.

 

What I am curious is how much of a weight difference is between the Benelli M4 Collapsible stock and the Standard Benelli M4 stock. Here is what I know from Mesa Tactical's forum:

 

Benelli M4 factory tactical stock: 1lb 10oz (26oz or 737g)

 

Urbino Tactical stock: 1lb 5oz (21oz or 595g)

Urbino Tactical stock with cheek riser: 1lb 10oz (26oz or 737g)

 

Anyone have the M4 Collapsible weight?

Edited by edho2002
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Ya mean like these ones??

Damn Skeeter, when are you gonna' shorten the bbl on that S Nova? All that money to make it shorter with the all mighty C-stock, then keep the 18" bbl, just doesn't look right IMHO :)

Unless you're just a T-Rex and need the 8" LOP? :)

Edited by Super Dak©
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Yeah.....well.....I thought I would try and be of some help. To bad these Urbino fanboys can't have the real stock that should go on this weapon.

 

Now now ... not all of us live in areas that allow the collapsible stock. Furthermore, with the Urbino my gun is 922r compliant and has a much improved LOP over the OEM stock it came with. It has an adjustable cheek riser for a perfect cheek weld with whatever optic I choose to put on the gun and a butt pad that significantly reduces the recoil beyond that of the OEM as well. It also has a sling mount that perfectly fits the configuration I need and has many more mount options should my needs change. The only limitation over the OEM, is that it requires a single flat head screw driver to remove it, and I don't see myself having to remove the stock often especially in a SHTF scenario nor do I see flat head screw drivers a hard to find item. It's also way WAY cheaper at $115 to $180 (depending on options) vs the $500+ common asking price of the collapsible stock.

 

It's not fanboy-ism ... it's smart consumerism. It makes a great gun even better. It certainly suits my needs and I'm willing to bet it suits the needs of many others. :)

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Now now ... not all of us live in areas that allow the collapsible stock. Furthermore, with the Urbino my gun is 922r compliant and has a much improved LOP over the OEM stock it came with. It has an adjustable cheek riser for a perfect cheek weld with whatever optic I choose to put on the gun and a butt pad that significantly reduces the recoil beyond that of the OEM as well. It also has a sling mount that perfectly fits the configuration I need and has many more mount options should my needs change. The only limitation over the OEM, is that it requires a single flat head screw driver to remove it, and I don't see myself having to remove the stock often especially in a SHTF scenario nor do I see flat head screw drivers a hard to find item. It's also way WAY cheaper at $115 to $180 (depending on options) vs the $500+ common asking price of the collapsible stock.

 

It's not fanboy-ism ... it's smart consumerism. It makes a great gun even better. It certainly suits my needs and I'm willing to bet it suits the needs of many others. :)

 

 

^ this

 

ths collabsable is illegal in my commie state and costs 500 more than the Urbino.

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Now now ... not all of us live in areas that allow the collapsible stock. Furthermore, with the Urbino my gun is 922r compliant and has a much improved LOP over the OEM stock it came with. It has an adjustable cheek riser for a perfect cheek weld with whatever optic I choose to put on the gun and a butt pad that significantly reduces the recoil beyond that of the OEM as well. It also has a sling mount that perfectly fits the configuration I need and has many more mount options should my needs change. The only limitation over the OEM, is that it requires a single flat head screw driver to remove it, and I don't see myself having to remove the stock often especially in a SHTF scenario nor do I see flat head screw drivers a hard to find item. It's also way WAY cheaper at $115 to $180 (depending on options) vs the $500+ common asking price of the collapsible stock.

 

It's not fanboy-ism ... it's smart consumerism. It makes a great gun even better. It certainly suits my needs and I'm willing to bet it suits the needs of many others. :)

 

Wel..........there ya go.:D

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The LOP on the factory C-stock is as follows. This was measured from the pistol grip/receiver interface to the center position on the end of the recoil pad..

 

Fully collapsed = 8 3/16"

 

Mid-position = 11 5/16"

 

Fully extended = 13 1/4"

 

isnt LOP measured from the trigger ?

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There are many of us who appreciate solid, fixed stocks. But we ain't in the zombie killing business... :)

 

-- Chuck

 

Have you ever used one of the OEM C-stocks on an M4? I think you would be surprised at how well made they are and how solid they feel in all three positions. At least mine is.

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Ok, revised LOP figures taken from the OEM C-stock. All measurements were taken following this drawing I found over on Shotgun World in this thread.

 

http://www.shotgunworld.com/bbs/viewtopic.php?t=141987&postdays=0&postorder=asc&start=0

 

 

85tss_stock.jpg

 

Fully collapsed = 9 1/8"

 

Middle position = 12 1/8"

 

Fully extended = 14 1/8"

 

Here is a great explanation of stock fit that is quoted from the same thread.

 

There are three specific measurements important in any shotgun stock. The measurements are "drop at comb," "drop at heel," and "length of pull."

 

Since exhaustive research and experimentation have shown that these three measurements can greatly affect shotgun shooting success, Browning takes special care to meet the most desirable measurements in each stock produced.

 

Length of Pull is the distance from the middle of the butt (recoil pad) to the trigger. A stock that is too long may catch under the arm pit, or drag on the lower shoulder. It will feel uncomfortable and awkward, and can markedly delay the fast execution of a shot. On the other hand, a stock that is too short may deliver more recoil to the shoulder and cheek.

 

Since most shotguns have no rear sights as do rifles, the shotgunner sights along a plane from breech to barrel muzzle to target. In effect, the shooter's eye is the rear sight. Thus the amount of drop at the comb is extremely important in its effect on good or poor shooting. Should the comb be too low, the shooter's eye will be too low when the gun is properly cheeked, and the gun will throw the charge below the mark. If the comb stands too high, the impact of the charge will consistently be above the target. In addition, the shooter must place his cheek against the comb of the stock at the same spot and in the same manner on each successive shot. Otherwise, the shooter will be erratic, sometimes shooting under his target and sometimes over.

 

The drop at heel measurement is just as important to good hunting as is drop at the comb. It contributes a great deal to proper gun alignment and, if excessive, will cause the recoil to be more noticeable. A 1 5/8 inch drop at the comb, a 2 1/2 inch drop at the heel will prove correct for at least 95% of the shooters.

 

For trap and skeet guns, a straighter stock is provided which means less drop at both the comb and heel. This is because the target is small and generally taken while rising. With a straighter stock there is less danger of shooting under the bird -- even though the shooter holds dead on without blotting out the bird with the muzzle as the shot is fired.

 

The shooter of average physical characteristics should use a stock of standard dimensions. The drop at both comb and heel will generally fit well. Any minor adjustments in the length of the stock should come after some shooting has been done.

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Have you ever used one of the OEM C-stocks on an M4? I think you would be surprised at how well made they are and how solid they feel in all three positions. At least mine is.
They're solid enough. Problem for me is they're not fixed and tend to be in the wrong position without notice.

 

-- Chuck

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They're solid enough. Problem for me is they're not fixed and tend to be in the wrong position without notice.

 

-- Chuck

 

Could you elaborate some more? Do you mean the release on the c-stock sometimes gets actuated or does it just randomly slip out of the notch? Does it happen while shooting or during maneuvering?

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Could you elaborate some more? Do you mean the release on the c-stock sometimes gets actuated or does it just randomly slip out of the notch? Does it happen while shooting or during maneuvering?

 

I can't imagine any of that that happening unless you somehow miss locking it up in one of the positions. Mine locks up solid on all three notches.

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