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M4 Maintenance

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I am pretty much a pistol guy and comfortable with field stripping and cleaning those. I just picked up my first shotgun, a Benelli M4, and would appreciate advice on what I need to get for cleaning and maintenance.

 

The manual seems rather vague to me. I checked youtube and ran across a video for taking down an M1. Is it pretty similar for the M4? I also saw there is a dvd called Mastering the Combat Shotgun which is supposed to go through dissassembly of the M4 and wondered if anyone was familiar with it and if it would be worth purchasing.

 

Also, I shot 6 birdshot cartridges to test it. Do I need to clean it before I take it out and shoot it for real?

 

Thanks in advance.

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I also saw there is a dvd called Mastering the Combat Shotgun which is supposed to go through dissassembly of the M4 and wondered if anyone was familiar with it and if it would be worth purchasing.

 

If the DVD you're referring to is the one with Lenny Magill, I've read mostly negative reviews.

 

The DVD set to consider is the Magpul Art of the Dynamic Shotgun.

Good reviews.

I'm not sure if it includes a maintenance section.

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After shooting 13,000 rounds through my M4 over the years, I've come to the conclusion that cleaning it is mostly a waist of time. All that matters is that it is lubricated. Saying this, since yours is brand new, you might have some break in issues with low dram loads. I'd feed it a 100 rounds of high brass and it should be good to go from there on out.

 

I clean it from time to time. Usually after about 500 - 1000 rounds whenever I'm bored.

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All that matters is that it is lubricated.

 

QFT

 

IMO it is absolutely essential that you keep your M4 well lubed with a high quality lubricant (except for the pistons of course) paying particular attention to the recoil link pin at the rear of the bolt carrier and all other wear surfaces both inside and outside the bolt carrier group as well as the pins in the fire control. It is also my opinion that one cannot get the recoil link pin and BCG 'too wet' with lubricant. I like to check mine before each shooting session.

Edited by Sukhoi_fan

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QFT

 

IMO it is absolutely essential that you keep your M4 well lubed with a high quality lubricant (except for the pistons of course) paying particular attention to the recoil link pin at the rear of the bolt carrier and all other wear surfaces both inside and outside the bolt carrier group as well as the pins in the fire control. It is also my opinion that one cannot get the recoil link pin and BCG 'too wet' with lubricant. I like to check mine before each shooting session.

 

this is probably obvious, but i want to ask to make sure. is this the "recoil link pin" that you recommend keeping well lubed?

 

benellim4recoillinkpin.png

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You are correct sir. The recoil link pin is the hardest working part on the entire weapon, taking all the abuse. Neglect it at your own peril (which is why I so strongly recommend keeping it 'wet' with lube at all times).

 

this is probably obvious, but i want to ask to make sure. is this the "recoil link pin" that you recommend keeping well lubed?

 

benellim4recoillinkpin.png

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http://www.farrarsodfarm.com/nelli/USMC_M1014.pdf

Leave the tampons,WD40 & Remoil for those that clean their Remington's

Try some Hoppe's solvent for the bore and some plain old bore mops and then a little Hoppe's Gun Grease in a couple areas and the some Hoppe's Gun oil in a lotta areas or some MILITEC-1 in some areas! Would keep the amount of lube down as low as possible as the more of anything you use the more it will collect junk! I am not much of a CLP person as my idea of doing all 3 at the same time is mind boggling! Also never think a new gun has been cleaned and lubed always do a clean and lube on anything new or you will probably have issues as most manufacturers do not clean and lube after machining a firearm? I know it sounds stupid and it is stupid but i have found several new firearms full of cutting fluid and all they would do is jam up! Once lubed they worked flawlessly! get plenty of lint free rags and be careful of mixing different chemicals as when they get down into cracks and areas that can't be cleaned well they can cause serious corrosion issues and pitting issues! Compressed air works great just keep the junk out of your eyes!

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They make an 870P Tactical? I thought the 870 Tacticals were all Express models.

 

there is a difference between the 870P and the 870 Express models. they have several flavors of the 870P for LE (but also available to the public)

 

http://www.remingtonmilitary.com/Firearms/Shotguns Pump/870P.aspx

 

Here's what Remington says about the differences between the Express and the Police:

 

 

REMINGTON ARMS COMPANY, LE DIVISION

Important differences between Remington 870 Police and 870 Express shotguns

 

 

The 870 Express has been an important part of Remington’s offering to the sporting market.

It was designed to meet a price point in the commercial market while still providing classic 870 functionality.

All of Remington’s 870’s have interchangeable parts, even if they have cosmetic differences.

It is also important to note that many manufacturers use the 870 Express platform for their Police / Combat models.

Without exception, every manufacturer who utilizes our 870 platform serves to upgrade their system to a more efficient, street worthy platform.

While the 870 Express is still an 870, the best pump shotgun on the market, there are some very important cosmetic and functional differences between it and the 870 Police.

To our customers in Law Enforcement, Military, Corrections, and Security, whose lives depend upon the unfailing performance of Remington shotguns, the Police modifications are of paramount importance. Synopses of the variances are provided below.

 

 

• 870 Police shotguns go thru a special 23 station check list – ranging from visual inspection, functional testing, test firing, and final inspection.

 

 

• All Police shotguns are assembled in a “special build area” at the plant in Ilion, NY. This section is secured and serves only to build LE and Military shotguns, with the same factory personnel working at that assignment each shift.

 

 

• All parts that enter the “special build area” are visually inspected by hand to ensure top quality and functionality.

 

 

• Due to heavy recoil in buck and slug loads, all 870 Police guns have a longer magazine spring which ensures positive feed and function.

 

 

• A heavier sear spring is used to generate a reliable, positive trigger pull between 5 and 8 lbs.

 

 

• A heavier carrier dog spring is used to ensure when the carrier elevates the shell, it will be held there until the bolt can push it into the chamber. This ensures positive feeding when using heavier payload rounds.

 

 

• Police shotguns do not have an ISS (Integrated Safety System) which is a locking mechanism on the safety of commercial shotguns. This type of locking mechanism can cause delay to an officer who needs the weapon but does not have the appropriate key. LE shotguns have the standard, proven, cross bolt safety.

 

 

• The fore-end on the Express model is longer and not compatible with many police shotgun vehicle racks.

 

 

• The Police shotguns utilize the heavy duty SPEEDFEED Stocks and Fore-ends.

 

 

• The Express model will not allow for the addition of an extension tube without physical modification to the tube and barrel, which can nullify the warranty.

 

 

• The Express model has a BEAD BLAST BLUE finish while the Police models utilize either High Luster bluing or Parkerization.

 

 

• The Express model utilizes a synthetic trigger housing while the Police models use a compressed metal housing.

 

 

• The Police shotgun barrel is locked down with a “ball detent” system in conjunction with the magazine cap vs. a lesser grade “synthetic magazine spring retainer” lock down as used on the Express system.

 

 

• The receivers used in Police guns are “vibra honed” to smooth out rough finishes and remove burrs before parkerization or bluing.

 

 

• Police shotguns use machined ejectors and extractors, as opposed to powdered metal cast which are utilized on the Express models.

 

IMG_1301-1024.jpg

 

IMG_1307-1024.jpg

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Do Benelli shotguns come oiled & lubricated from the factory? Or do I have to totally disassemble it & do it?

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5 hours ago, Nickthedog said:

Do Benelli shotguns come oiled & lubricated from the factory? Or do I have to totally disassemble it & do it?

IMO, any brand new out of the box firearm should be broken down to at least it's major groups and thoroughly lubed before it's taken out and shot for the very first time.

Iv'e seen some guns being pretty dry NIB from the factory.

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