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Guest elizabeth123

Waterfowl Shooting Tips

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Guest elizabeth123

Hey there guys, I just want to share this:

 

Hitting lakes and ponds for waterfowl is one of the joys of hunting, but hitting the dastardly quick creatures can sometimes be frustrating, and saps the enthusiasm for getting up early and going out to the blind. There are some tips that can help make your hunt more successful and will keep the joy of hunting alive and well.

 

[h=2]Preparing Before the Hunt[/h]

  • Practice makes perfect. Find a clay shooting course and repeatedly hit the shooting spots that have similar styles to what you might see while on the pond: flybys, straight-on shots and traveling away. Go hunting for doves. These birds, which usually have a generous bag limit, are a great way for waterfowl hunters to get their practice in. Doves have a tendency to fly at the same angles as ducks, geese and other waterfowl. This will also help teach you to follow through on your swing while firing. Following through on the motion is a sure way to get a great shot on a bird in flight.


[h=2]Know When and Where to Shoot[/h]

  • Don't rush the shot. Jumping up and firing at a flock of birds coming in is a sure way to end up empty-handed. Wait for the birds to be in a great location before slowly rising to your feet and putting the bead in front of a single bird and firing. Many hunters when a flock is coming in for a landing will fire at the entire mass of birds, expecting to take down at least one of them. Instead, they miss any vital shots and the birds flap away.


[h=2]Shoot the Trailing Bird[/h]

  • When a line of birds comes into the area, don't shoot the lead bird, especially if hunting with a partner. Many hunters have trained themselves to fire at the bird coming in on the lead, which means it's likely you and the person you are hunting with will likely aim for the same animal. If you choose the trailing bird, you'll not only likely be the only one shooting at it, but it will also put your gun in great position to fire successive rounds at fleeing birds from the flock.


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Good points. I've noticed I react slower now (age) & that is a plus in not only shooting but fishing. I used to do exactly as you said, jump up & shoot at the whole flock usually missing all, then maybe on the 2nd or 3rd shot aim at a single target.

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Hey there guys, I just want to share this:

 

Hitting lakes and ponds for waterfowl is one of the joys of hunting, but hitting the dastardly quick creatures can sometimes be frustrating, and saps the enthusiasm for getting up early and going out to the blind. There are some tips that can help make your hunt more successful and will keep the joy of hunting alive and well.

 

Preparing Before the Hunt

 

  • Practice makes perfect. Find a clay shooting course and repeatedly hit the shooting spots that have similar styles to what you might see while on the pond: flybys, straight-on shots and traveling away. Go hunting for doves. These birds, which usually have a generous bag limit, are a great way for waterfowl hunters to get their practice in. Doves have a tendency to fly at the same angles as ducks, geese and other waterfowl. This will also help teach you to follow through on your swing while firing. Following through on the motion is a sure way to get a great shot on a bird in flight.


Know When and Where to Shoot

 

  • Don't rush the shot. Jumping up and firing at a flock of birds coming in is a sure way to end up empty-handed. Wait for the birds to be in a great location before slowly rising to your feet and putting the bead in front of a single bird and firing. Many hunters when a flock is coming in for a landing will fire at the entire mass of birds, expecting to take down at least one of them. Instead, they miss any vital shots and the birds flap away.


Shoot the Trailing Bird

 

  • When a line of birds comes into the area, don't shoot the lead bird, especially if hunting with a partner. Many hunters have trained themselves to fire at the bird coming in on the lead, which means it's likely you and the person you are hunting with will likely aim for the same animal. If you choose the trailing bird, you'll not only likely be the only one shooting at it, but it will also put your gun in great position to fire successive rounds at fleeing birds from the flock.


 

Not sure where or when but, I read this before somewhere. Good advice though.

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