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StrangerDanger

Benelli M4 -- Complete Trigger Group Assembly Guide

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Quick Questions regarding lubing the trigger assembly. I noticed you have points on the trigger assembly where you recommend lubing. Let's say one has been lubing many areas of the trigger assembly other than those noted. Would that be a reason the trigger starts having issues hitting the firing pin when the temp gets cold?

 

I wasn't sure where to lube, so I started lubing all of the trigger assembly points that have springs, etc.

 

If this was a mistake, how would one completely clean the trigger assembly...by disassembling the whole thing and cleaning all the parts with solvent? Also, is there any type of lubing to the trigger assembly you recommend outside of the ones noted in this documentation?

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Hey,

How many rounds do you have on your weapon?

 

Lubricant choices can be effected by temperature. How cold of a climate are you operating in? It is okay to lubricate the rest of the trigger group lightly. Excess lubricant will simply make a mess and attract fowling. It should still function normally though. Take the trigger group out of the weapon and manipulate the moving parts by hand. Feel for gritty movements or if the parts bind at all. If it feels gritty, you can try blasting the parts out with a solvent like Breakfree. You'll need to lubricate the parts afterwards. I personally prefer disassembly of the trigger group when doing detailed cleaning or problem solving. I like to have spare pins and springs on hand so that I can compare the springs with a new unit. I've found several springs to have been compressed shorter than a new one when it is in it's rest state. You shouldn't have these issues until you pass 5000 rounds.

 

Any grease will work fine for the sear contact points. They shouldn't be causing the failure you describe. I'd try a new lubricant that is meant for cold weather environments. I can't really give a recommendation since I live in Arizona and it's 50 degrees right now in the middle of winter.

 

Are you certain that the bolt is fully seating? Any markings on the unfired round's primer that the hammer dropped on?

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StrangerDanger;

Here's some answers to your questions.

 

Q1: How many rounds do you have on your weapon?

A2: approx 1000...over a period of 12 months.

 

Q2: How cold of a climate are you operating in?

A2: Im in ATL, but I go out shooting every month or two. I liberally lube the trigger assembly and the rest of the gun, but that seems to be hindering the trigger action, etc rather than protecting/helping.

 

Q3: Take the trigger group out of the weapon and manipulate the moving parts by hand. Feel for gritty movements or if the parts bind at all.

A3: I just did this and I do not feel anything grinding.

 

Q4: I like to have spare pins and springs on hand so that I can compare the springs with a new unit.

A4: Where do you purchase a new set of springs for the trigger assembly? Straight from Benelli?

 

Q5: I'd try a new lubricant that is meant for cold weather environments.

A5: I was using Frog Lube for a while until it started getting cold. However, each time i've seen the hammer almost slow, there has been a cold snap over the week before I go shooting. Also, I clean my gun, then stash it away for almost a month thinking the gun is fine. But I probably need to clean the gun regularly or the night before I go shooting. Oddly enough, I think its pointless to have a home defense weapon like the M4 when its gums up when sitting in the closet for a month or so over the winter.

 

Q6: Are you certain that the bolt is fully seating?

A6: Most definitely...it seats fine.

 

Q7: Any markings on the unfired round's primer that the hammer dropped on?

A7: Actually, YES. I came on this site after today's visit to the range when I noticed the PRIMER had a very light dent from the firing pin. It looked as if the firing pin was ever-so-slightly hitting the shell's primer. I assumed it was a dud until it happened a couple times. I wanted to blame the crappy shells, but the NobleSport Shells I purchased seemed fine. Link to the shells (http://www.ammunitiontogo.com/product_info.php/pName/250rds-12-gauge-nobelsport-hunting-2-34-3-14-dram-1-18-oz-7-12-shot-ammo/cName/12-gauge-birdshot).

 

Maybe the shells?

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Also, I checked on some cold-weather lubes for duck hunters, and I found the following thread.

 

http://www.duckhuntingchat.com/forum/viewtopic.php?f=13&t=152266

 

It says to get FP-10, for cold weather lubrication (link below). It also says I should use "a small thin layer" of lube. I never did that. I thought I was supposed to slop it on thick when Im not shooting it regularly. That may also be my problem...too much lube.

 

Lube Link : http://www.amazon.com/Shooters-Choice-FP-10-LUBRICANT-ELITE/dp/B0000C529R/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1389577598&sr=8-1&keywords=FP-10+LUBRICANT

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A lot of lubricant that thickens in extreme cold weather (think below 32 degrees) might start performing sluggishly.

 

Brownells has factory parts listed here:

http://www.brownells.com/schematics/Benelli-U-S-A-/M4-sid916.aspx

 

Hoppes #9 certainly won't hurt anything. I've soaked parts in it for days without issues.

 

I have mixed feelings about Frog Lube. Under ideal circumstances it works well. However, I had issues with the lubricant. Freaking ants came in and got in my safe to eat the lube off of the weapons. It seems to perform well when everything is warm. Make sure that there isn't built up Frog Lube inside the bolt carrier which may be limiting the movement of the firing pin.

 

If the problems persist with the new lubricant, it might be time send the weapon back to Benelli for them to resolve the problems.

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Yep! Damn ants stripped the lube off of the weapons. They left nothing but what appeared to be small whitish granules behind. I noted a b line of ants heading to the safe downstairs. Upon opening it up, the little pricks were all over the weapons feasting on Frog jizz. What's weird is they never messed with the open container of Frog lube sitting on the table. I don't know if they couldn't figure out how to get on the table or what.

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I had heard of trained dolphins used for military operations, but with the proliferation of frog lube, they should consider recruiting ants to induce weapon malfunctions.

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StrangerDanger;

I just completed cleaning, tearing down and reassembling the trigger assembly. Im about to head to the range to test some rounds. Ill let you know how it worked out. Thanks for the great instructions!

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Slight update to the disassembly guide. I have been using an easier method of removing the carrier plunger and spring. You can remove/reinstall these two parts when the trigger pack is fully assembled. This makes it a lot easier when it comes to reassembly. You just grab the plunger and spring, compress it into the trigger group, and the other end will come out of the carrier latch easily.

 

Just received my FFL license today too!

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Thanks! Took myself a long time to talk myself into jumping through the hoops. The ATF agent that did my interview was really nice and helpful. Complete opposite of what I expected. It did help having eight elk along with two bucks laying in my front yard. He kept saying, "I can't F'ing believe this," while taking pictures and video with his eyephone.

 

Now the efile 4473 software is a royal pain in the ass. :/

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SD,

I have found it pretty handy to fabricate an inexpensive tool modified from a free paint can lid tool to compress similar styled springs on their plungers, which makes the task of controlling their removal and installation a cinch. Polish the tips to avoid any marring of parts.

 

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Edited by benelliwerkes

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Thanks for pictures as always. On some models, is the spring/plunger difficult to compress? On all the M4's I've done, I found it pretty easy to do with my fingers.

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Not so much too stiff to compress but with lubricants on the springs and plungers, I just like the control the gadget provides to prevent a spring or plunger from flying off to the far corner of the work space or into the safety glasses.

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Another update:

 

Benelli has been shipping out M4's with plastic trigger housings for about a year and a half now. There is only one area that is different for the disassembly guide. The carrier plunger inserts into a washer that is inserted into the side of the trigger group. After removing the carrier plunger/spring assembly, you can pull the washer out easily.

 

Naturally there is a lot less casting marks on the plastic housing compared to the old aluminum ones.

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