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Webfoot

Hevi-shot

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Originally posted by Webfoot:

Thanks for the info.

 

Does anyone use it for duck/goose hunting? If so what size? Has anyone gone back to using 2 3/4 because of it?

 

Hey Tucker, I've heard of this guy...Osama...He might be able to help you with that uranium your after. While you're at it, show him just how well your Benelli works... :D ;)

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I've used Hevi Shot for 3 years for ducks and geese.

I find the single B will drop a Honker stone dead at 45-50 and we use 4-6 on ducks depending on the wind.

The dense configuration allows you to use an IC choke which patterns to about an imptoved Modified.

Jeff

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Originally posted by heavy4x4:

To add to what tucker said:

 

What you're looking for is down-range energy.

Kinetic energy is defined as (1/2)M*V^2. M is the mass of the projectile and V is the velocity.

 

One pellet of Hevi-shot has more mass than a lead pellet of the same size. So, if one pellet of each is flying at the same speed, the Hevi-shot will have greater energy downrange.

 

Now, when people told you "speed kills," they were right. You'll notice in the equation for kinetic energy that velocity is squared. So, increasing velocity will increase energy better than increasing mass. This is the reason for the "high-speed" steels. Because steel shot has less mass than lead shot, shell companies increased the velocity so that the downrange energy was about the same as standard lead shot.

For example (and I did NOT use any actual masses for this, I'm just throwing out a "for instance"), a #6 lead pellet fired at 1500fps will carry more energy downrange than a #6 Hevi-shot pellet at 1200fps even though the Hevi-shot pellet has more mass.

 

Ultimately, you want to shoot the heaviest, fastest round out there.

 

Then, of course, you'll be dealing with major recoil. As Newton's law says, "every action has an equal and opposite reaction." That is to say, the mass and acceleration of the shot coming out of your barrel is equal to the mass of your gun and how much it accelerates into your shoulder. A heavier gun = less felt recoil.

 

Happy hunting/shooting

-Steve

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Man, you must have a college degree in physic's! That's some pretty heavy stuff you laid on all of us. I cant wait to try the Hevi-shot on some waterfowl. Thanks Dude!! Peace out.

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Originally posted by stlcardswin:

quote:
Originally posted by heavy4x4:

To add to what tucker said:

 

What you're looking for is down-range energy.

Kinetic energy is defined as (1/2)M*V^2. M is the mass of the projectile and V is the velocity.

 

One pellet of Hevi-shot has more mass than a lead pellet of the same size. So, if one pellet of each is flying at the same speed, the Hevi-shot will have greater energy downrange.

 

Now, when people told you "speed kills," they were right. You'll notice in the equation for kinetic energy that velocity is squared. So, increasing velocity will increase energy better than increasing mass. This is the reason for the "high-speed" steels. Because steel shot has less mass than lead shot, shell companies increased the velocity so that the downrange energy was about the same as standard lead shot.

For example (and I did NOT use any actual masses for this, I'm just throwing out a "for instance"), a #6 lead pellet fired at 1500fps will carry more energy downrange than a #6 Hevi-shot pellet at 1200fps even though the Hevi-shot pellet has more mass.

 

Ultimately, you want to shoot the heaviest, fastest round out there.

 

Then, of course, you'll be dealing with major recoil. As Newton's law says, "every action has an equal and opposite reaction." That is to say, the mass and acceleration of the shot coming out of your barrel is equal to the mass of your gun and how much it accelerates into your shoulder. A heavier gun = less felt recoil.

 

Happy hunting/shooting

-Steve

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Originally posted by tsg912:

Caution,

Hevi-shot can and will damage barrels and or choke tubes. When hevi-shot was first brought onto the market it destroyed several consumer firearms and they quickly pulled it off shelves. A company called Environmental was producing it and when they pulled it and stopped production Remington bought the patten and redesigned the wad to release the load further down range and it is also thicker than normal steel or lead shot wads. The Remington wad is made to protect the barrel from the shot and not the shot from the barrel as in lead.

 

For all of you who have shot hevi-shot, have you had a hard time cleaning your barrel? Remington uses small plastic balls about the size of #2 steel shot as a buffer between the hevi-shot load and the crimp of the hull. When this buffer is being pushed through a barrel at sub-sonic speeds they tend to melt and leave a p-nut butter consistency residue that is hard to clean off/out of a barrel.

 

Also, go ahead and cut one open, I know it's like burning money but if you care about your firearm you'll wanna know what you're putting through it. Examine each shot, hardly any of which are the same size and you'll be hard pressed to find 2 that have no deficiencies in them. If you pattern hevi-shot you'll see and amazing pattern, well that's because of the differing shot sizes in the shells. You may have bought #4's but you have some 2's, 5's, and 6's mixed in; but mostly 4's. The small shot acts as a buffer and fills in the voids, making the shooter think he/she has a heck of a pattern and could possibly kill a turkey at say 60 or so yards when in reality the small shot at that distance may not have the velocity, which equals kenetic energy, to kill a turkey.

 

What makes lead hard to work with? When lead shot is fired from a barrel the individual pellets become deformed and are robbed of their aerodynamic abilities, this is why you get "flyers" when pattering lead shot. Hevi-shot is much harder than lead therefore it does not deform as easy that is why you could get scratches, scars, gouges, or even cracked barrels or choke tubes. This is also why lead shot pellets are copper-plated. The copper-plating helps maintain the roundness and aerodynamics of the shot.

 

I have killed many ducks with hevi-shot before I was educated on the material and I used both 2-3/4" and 3". Yes, I was impressed with the performance as I was able to take more passing birds and birds which may have been out of range had I been using steel. However, I personally will not use them until I see a more uniform shot size and better quality control of pellets (less deficiencies). I didn't want to change any minds just wanted to shed some light. I cannot wait to examine and try the new Winchester Extended Range, maybe that will be approved for waterfowl.

dump the Remington loads and go straight to the source hevi-shot

 

remington only has a marketing/sales agreement with Environmetal Inc. .. and their loads are junk compared to the original.

 

the reason the pellets are not uniform is because of the properties of the materials.. they're working hard to create a better consistancy of size but its really moot when you pull the trigger and something falls dead.

 

the shot cup is key in these loads.. special wads/cups have been developed to handle the hardness of the shot.. use them!

 

never had any damage to my guns from shooting it.. but then again.. I don't shoot the Remington loads.. actually, I don't shoot any Remington ammo.. thats just me tho.

 

once you shoot it ... you'll change your thoughts on how much your hunting ammo costs with out a doubt! ;)

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