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The_Gun_Guy

choke tube oil

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I have used birchwood&casey for all of my shotgun life and It cost 6$ for a 5cm half-squeezed tube :rolleyes:

 

Does anyone know a of a cheaper or come with a decent amount of lube?

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thats kind of risky, isn't it flammable?

 

and is it really reliable. I only use choke lube for competetion because I don't want any malfunctioning when I'm on the spot.

 

my barrel will reach about 300 or so degrees and I nee d to be sure that the oil in the barrel is not going to catch fire, and still protect my barrel.

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hmmm.... I'll have to check on that. I've been using it for years, no 3 alarm fires yet. A normal day at the range for me is anywhere between 100 to 300 rounds. I don't put it in dripping wet though, just a film to protech it from rust and from seizing in the barrel.

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after you clean it with the light coat does any of the gun powder that leaks in between the chokes dry up before you can wipe it off after shooting.

 

If you lost me please tell me because that was pourly worded.

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I just always use Rem oil as well. I felt (right or not?) that choke lube oil was another specialty product that was more a case of someone trying to find a niche in a market versus something that is truly required. If you listen to all the product manufacturers, I'd have 20 different products to clean my gun. I use 2. But, That is just my opinion... If someone could definitively say I am risking something, I'll listen... Oh yeah, I clean my gun every time I use it as soon as I am done, so that may make a difference too.

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It depend on what you have if you have several guns it is important to have a veriety of oils. However In your case I would limit the best working oil for each gun I use 3 becuase each specializes in removing a specififc fouling. giving me a total of 12 different oils. this is a list of oils that you will need though. You don't necessarily need them it's just what works best with each.

 

For shotguns, you need powder solvent

for pistols, you need hoppes semi-auto solvent

for rifles. you need hoppes Bench rest copper solvent.

 

If you have those three oils for specific guns you will find ease in cleaning and also you will have cleaned the bore better. also you shouldn't use just some oil to clean because it is a risk. It must say that it is OK to use in bores because that the standard oil is highly flamable and If you miss a little left behind in the bore it will ignite. you won't notice it but the extreme undistributed heat will cause severe damage to your barrel.

 

choke tube oil is not required you should be fine with rem oil but I would recomend it for competetion because I have seen other people have problems with there choke oil because it was just regular lube and they were firing several shots at a time.

 

yes cleaning your gun every time you use it will make a difference. if you let it sit the build up in the barrel is just getting more and more permenent.

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Well those are solvents, not oils......

 

I use good old hoppes #9 to clean my barrel and chokes, along with a bronze brush. (bronze won't scratch steel because it's softer than steel) Then I spray my freshly cleaned chokes with Rem-Oil, and store them in either a choke case or tube untill I'm ready yo use them. The barrell also gets a protective coating of Rem-Oil applied via a wool mop.

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I need some advice on expert barrel cleaning. my father uses a escort 12 ga and I don't know what he did but it looks like he got some sort of burn on the barrel but it is shaped like a stain and looks like the insilation from buckshot or something did it from burning. And I can't remove it.

 

can anyone advise me on how to remove this? becaus I have never got it from any of my shotguns. And trust me I have already soaked it to death.

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Is this stain on the inside or outside of the barrel? If it's on the outside, what sort of finish does it have? (blued, parkerized, cameo) A picture would be very helpful. Perhaps a water spot, if so the only way to get rid of it would be to use steel wool and then reblue the spot in question, but it's hard to match factory bluing.

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It's not on the outside and trust me if it was I would really be pissed, it's a custom job with most modern matte black finish that is water proof, fire proof, rust proof, and guarenteed to keep its color under extreme temperatures. also certified by the NRA, and it cost him 400$.

 

setting that aside, the stain is on the inside and it is not coming out with any of my solvents. :( I evan tried a steel tornado brush (forgive me) and it didn't even phase it. It could be damage from the wad. but I can't be sure in this case I am going to visit my parents again this weekend and whatever it is I don't want it to become permenant. I am pretty sure that the longer I wait the worse it will get so I am running against the clock. Is there any solvent or cleaner that you can think of that can get rid of the worst deposites?

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Hmmm... This is a puzzler.

Does it have any coloration to it? Maybe the barrel was over heated by prolonged rapid fire. Over heating will often cause a bluish discoloration, or a spot that seems to have a rainbow colored band around it. Is it a ring that goes around the barrel or is it a spot on one side of the barrel?

 

Where inside the barrel is the spot? Near the muzzle or closer to the breach? Is it directly in front of the forcing cone? If so could be someone tried to shoot a 3½” shell in a 3” chamber. Better check for a bulge in the barrel. You’ll need a good carpenter’s square, a drafter’s triangle, or some other reliable straight edge to check for such a bulge.

 

If it’s just a streak from a wadding Hoppe’s #9 should be able to get it out. Here’s the only trick I know for wadding streaks. Plug one end of the barrel and fill it with Hoppe’s #9 solvent. Let it sit for about an hour, then drain it. Then take you cleaning rod and remove the “T” handle. (Most are just screwed on.) Place the handle end of the rod in the chuck of a hand drill, and insert your bronze bore brush in the other end. Insert in barrel and squeeze the trigger. (The one on the drill, not the gun.) If that doesn’t work, it isn’t going to come off.

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It is a spot not a ring, Also it is impossible for it to have been a 3 1/2 shell because it is my fathers shotgun and He doesn't even own a 3 1/2 chambered gun and all he has at this time is the standard target 2 3/4 loads.

 

He already tried that with a tornado brush and it didn't work. I know it is coming out becaue every time I put solvent in it the patches always come out dirty. just like normal only they never came out clean.

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Dumb question- Are you sure it is a STAIN and not the absence of the finish? Could the finish have been removed somehow (Over-aggressive cleaning, etc?)...

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