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New R1, and 1st rifle


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Hello, I recieved a new R1 for x-mas which I asked for, but this is my first rifle ever and I dont even know where to begin!? I know nothing about rifle ammo, rifle scopes, care of the gun, break in procedures, sight in, ........you get my drift. I would like to become efficiant enough to take it out big game hunting with confidence. It is the 30-06 and someday I would like to take it out of the deer fields and into Moose, Elk, antelope, and Bear country as well. I wanted to come here because I figured who would know better than R1 owners and experienced rifle shooters. All I can gather so far is it jams a bit and is'nt as accurate as some other guns out there. I just hope I asked for the right gun, so any tips, tricks, or advice will be appreciated!

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Rangerrookie,

You have some homework to do. That said, very nice Christmas present. Someone is taking good care of you. Here are some quick thoughts:

 

Break In

Yes, there is a process for this. Some people do, some don't. I did. The way I looked at it, why not. It is a fun afternoon, you get to know your gun, and it certainly doens't cause any harm. The short version is this. You shoot your gun, and clean your gun often through the break in process. During the first 5 shots, you shoot once, then clean. After 5 shots, you should have cleaned it 5x. After this, you shoot 3, then clean. 20 rounds in you should have cleaned your gun 10x. Tucker had some link to a good break in process that provided more detail. maybe he'll chime in what that. if not, do a google search for rifle breakin. Learn how to clean cooper fouling. These are thorough cleanings. Each cleaning will take 5-10 min. Pick a nice day. It is fun.

 

Shells

I like Fusion and Federals. My 300 WSM for some reason didn't like Winchesters. I am going to revisit that next year. It may have been me. Too much to explain, but I learned about some technical issue I was doing wrong.

 

Scopes

I have a Zeiss. I thought it was better than the Leupold and Nikon. I also like both of those brands. Simply put, all three are very nice. Consider a 3x9 or 3.5x10 for your gun given where you live and what you are planning. If I were doing it again, I might consider a 4x14 or something like that. I have a 3.5x10 and I do like it.

 

Triggers

A number of us have had our R1 triggers worked on. Generally the R1 comes out of the box with a 5-6-7 pound trigger. Generally more trigger weight = accuracy problems. Some people do just fine so you'll have to figure out what you prefer. I have mine set at about 3.25 pounds. WARNING: A lighter trigger can lead to a greater likelihood of accidental discharge. Accidental discharge can cause serious harm. Be careful if you are going to consider this. To learn more about this, go to a gun store, like Cabelas, dry fire an R1, then dry fire a Kimber, or something like that. The Kimber will proabably be in the 3+ pound range. There is a marked difference. Before you think about this, spend lots of time practicing. If you proceed, a gun smith will likely do this for you for about $50. A gunsmith at Gander Mtn did mine.

 

Gun Care

Keep your gun clean. Semi more than bolts want to be kept clean. If you are out in the rain, or your gun gets wet from humidity, wipe it down and let it air dry. NEVER put you gun away for the year without a thorough final cleaning. Grab a beer and you'll spend an enjoyable hour with your toy.

 

Accuracy

Don't expect 1 MOA, do expect less than 2" You sound well intended, but inexperienced. Practice, practice, practice. The other thing I learned is to make sure you apply no downward or sideways pressure to the gun's barrel or forearm. The barrel is pretty obvious, but remember that the forearm is directly connected to the barrel on the R1. This is not true with a good bolt. You can pretty easily move your point of impact an inch or two by applying a relatively small amount of downward pressure to your forearm. Buy yourself a gun rest. They are cheap and quite helpful.

 

Congrats on your new toy. There are quite a few people on these forums that will chime in with ideas.

 

By the way, we are neighbors. I am in WI.

 

Good luck. Be safe. Have fun. I hope this helps get you started.

Jim

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...buddy- please be sure to take a gun/hunter safety class. I know they are usually required for a license, but I mean REALLY take it. Learn. More importantly than your having a gun you need to learn is entering a wonderful, special sport that is very dangerous if you don't take it seriously. PLease make sure you understand that you must always, always make sure you know what is on the other side of an animal before you shoot at it. Do that, and practice with your new gun using the tips above, and you'll have a great life simply either hunting or waiting until your next hunt.

 

God Bless.

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I took a hunter safety coarse when I was 15, but I've been hunting with a scoped remington 12 ga till now. Now I just have to figure out how to properly aim a rifle considering all the elements. I look at the ammo boxes and they are zeroed at 100 yds and some drop 14 inches by the time they hit 200yds, is that true? I bought 3 differant types of ammo the other day to try and see which works best with the gun, but I have to wait until I get it scoped first.

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Zero a 30-06 to be dead on at 200 yards.

This will make it about 2" high at 100 yards.

This difference will allow you to hold dead on out to 200 - 250 yards.

With this zero, the bullet will strike the target at about 8" low at 300 yards.

 

Shooting big game beyond 300 yards takes some very good equipment, a good deal of practice, and an advanced knowledge of trajectories and wind drift.

 

The high shoulder shot, striking the animal in the center of the shoulder blade, will drop almost all north american big game animals in their tracks.

 

Essentially, this shot breaks a three way intersection of the deer's nervous system and renders it immobile instantaneously.

 

You can see this intersection on the below image.

When struck with the kinetic energy of a bullet, the deer's front feet and back feet are taken right out from under him, and all traffic to and from the brain ceases.

It's impossible for him to go another step.

 

Practice shot placement by looking at pictures of deer taken from different angles. Keep in mind that the path to the sweet spot changes as the angles change.

 

460519.jpg

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Zero a 30-06 to be dead on at 200 yards.

This will make it about 2" high at 100 yards.

This difference will allow you to hold dead on out to 200 - 250 yards.

With this zero, the bullet will strike the target at about 8" low at 300 yards.

 

Shooting big game beyond 300 yards takes some very good equipment, a good deal of practice, and an advanced knowledge of trajectories and wind drift.

 

The high shoulder shot, striking the animal in the center of the shoulder blade, will drop almost all north american big game animals in their tracks.

 

Essentially, this shot breaks a three way intersection of the deer's nervous system and renders it immobile instantaneously.

 

You can see this intersection on the below image.

When struck with the kinetic energy of a bullet, the deer's front feet and back feet are taken right out from under him, and all traffic to and from the brain ceases.

It's impossible for him to go another step.

 

Practice shot placement by looking at pictures of deer taken from different angles. Keep in mind that the path to the sweet spot changes as the angles change.

 

460519.jpg

 

 

What an awesome post.

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Nice post Tucker. I read about this in some hunting magazine this past year and they too said any deer shot here will simply drop. I think we all tend to aim for the heart/lung area, I like this idea better. Nice post for helping people understand.

Jim

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