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Showing content with the highest reputation since 06/27/2020 in Posts

  1. 4 points
    My Background The M4 is my first shotgun, and I have never taken a formal training class with it. My M4 haD less than 200 rounds through it before this class. My Equipment The Shotgun M4 with a steel 7 round tube, C-stock in the middle position, and the following mods: Surefire Dual Fuel Light on an IWC QD Mount GG&G Bolt Release TTI Shell Lifter Aimpoint T2 on ADM Low Mount FFT Trigger Set and A&S Housing IWC QD Rear Mount VTAC 2 Point Sling Tactical Gear SOE 12 GA Micro Rig The Class This was a “Basic Tactical Shotgun” run by a well-regarded local outfit that I’ve trained with before. It’s the first of a three class progression. This class focused heavily on a handful of items: Understanding how the shotgun patterns and functions at different distances and with different loads. We ran a variety of 00 Buck, #4 Buck, and slug loads at 7, 15, 25, and 50 yards. We then ran the slugs all the way out to 100. This was done from standing, supported kneeling, and even prone position. Learning how to do combat and speed reloads. This was a major emphasis of the training and one that was eye-opening for me. Dynamically loading while engaging multiple reactive targets was fun. Doing “slug select” drills to dynamically change out the round that you have. Concluded with a “shoot house” engaging paper targets The temperature hovered in the low to mid 90s for most of the training, requiring us to build in plenty of water and cooling breaks. Lessons Learned Know what ammo your gun likes: I can say with confidence that I’m never using Fiocchi #4 Buck again. Had multiple, repeated failures to eject/extract that led to a lot of (unexpected, but valuable) experience in failure clearance drills. This was not an issue with either my Federal Tactical slugs or PMC 00 Buck. Malfunction drills require a lot more thinking than an AR or a handgun: It’s not as easy as “tap, rack, bang” with an M4. For example, FTEs because of an extended crimp are not as simple as cycling the bolt and smacking the receiver. Getting a live round back into the chamber once you clear also requires practiced discipline with the manual of arms. You feel every ounce of weight you drop off of this platform: The M4 is a heavy beast, especially when you’re using it for several hours during a 90 degree day. Dropping the Mesa side saddle helped, but I’m looking forward to replacing my steel tube with a titanium one. I may even SBS this thing and drop down to 14” barrel. This is an impressively accurate gun: With a 2 MOA red dot and Truball slugs, I was making consistent spine box hits at 75 yards, and was hitting “minute of man” at 100. I was not truthfully not expecting that out of this gun. For my fellow lefties, you have to work on modifying manual of arms: While the safety can be swapped and things like combat reloads might be easier because of visibility into the bolt, other drills are not. For example, grabbing a round off of a chest rig to do a slug select can be tricky. You have to rotate the gun, tuck it into your armpit, use your left hand to current round and hold it open long enough to drop in the new slug. Anyway, it was a very eye opening experience for me. I’m still sore (birdshot didnt come in in time, so ran the entire course with buck and slugs) and a touch dehydrated, but well worth the time and energy.
  2. 3 points
    M1014/11701: Limited edition flag model. Comes with a oem collapsible stock that doesn’t function. The receiver extension is neutered to prevent function. Barrel does not have removable chokes. The original release of 1-2500 came with aluminum trigger frames. Current production flag editions outside of this initial release have polymer frames. Original release had a different barrel design that didn’t have the seating ring that mates against the receiver face. Handguards were slightly different as to account for this seat ring. 922(r) rules apply for modifying the shotgun’s capacity and collapsible stock. 11703: When originally released, this was a 4 port barreled model made for low recoil rounds. Everyone hated it and Benelli would replace the barrel if asked. The shotgun would beat itself to death if standard rounds were used. It also came with the neutered receiver extension. It came with a pistol grip stock. Barrel assembly has removable chokes. Came with an aluminum trigger frame. For some stupid reason, Benelli released this model number again around 2014 with some changes. The barrel is the standard 2 port barrel. It has a regular 3 position receiver extension. It came with a polymer trigger frame. Came with a field stock. Why they didn’t give it its own model number, we will never know. These models are rare to see anymore. 922(r) rules apply for modifying the shotgun’s capacity and collapsible stock. 11707: This is the gold standard model. Comes with a 3 position receiver extension. Barrel is a 2 port barrel with removable chokes. The barrel have the new seat ring design and some modifications to the barrel extension inside the receiver. Early production models came with aluminum trigger frames where as current production models have the polymer ones. We’ve seen some minor changes in finishes on small parts like the Argo plugs and receiver anodizing over the years. Some Receivers almost have an OD green hue. These models come with a 5 round magazine that has a limiter in place. 922(r) rules apply for modifying the shotgun’s capacity and collapsible stock. I will note that 60 were released from Benelli with 7 round magazines and functional collapsible stocks until the ATF made them stop. 11710: This M4 essentially the same as a 11707, but it comes with a field stock. 11711: This model has all of the features of the 11707, but the shotgun was plated in Np3 by Robar. These are quite rare and not to be confused with the Cerakote model that is painted silver to copy the look. These true NP3 plated models are arguably considered the best model due to the performance of the Np3 finish. 922(r) rules apply for modifying the shotgun’s capacity and collapsible stock. 11713: This M4 is a law enforcement model that is 922(R) exempt like the 11721. This model has all of the features of the 11707. The only real difference is it comes with a steel 7 round magazine tube. 11717: This model has all of the features of the 11707, but the shotgun has a three tone desert camo pattern. 922(r) rules apply for modifying the shotgun’s capacity and collapsible stock. 11721: This is a law enforcement model that has all the features of the 11707 but doesn’t have to abide by 922(R) restrictions. It isn’t meant to be sold to civilians, but they often are. They are sold at a premium price. Given that it comes with a collapsible stock, this makes the price more appealing. The shotgun includes a 7 round steel magazine tube. 11723: This is a 14” Entry gun version of the M4 the barrel doesn’t have a removable choke. This would be a NFA firearm. It comes with the field stock. Other features are similar to the 11707/11721. 5 round capacity due to length. 11724: This is a 14” Entry gun version of the M4 the barrel doesn’t have a removable choke. This would be a NFA firearm. It comes with the oem collapsible stock other features are similar to the 11707/11721. 5 round capacity due to length. 11795: This model is similar to the 11707 in features. The only real difference is it is Cerakoted. I have seen both a H2O titanium finish and a dark earth color option. Pistol grip and field stocks can be had under this model. 11796: This is a law enforcement model like the 11713/11724. The only difference is the Cerakote paint options. The firearm is generally sold with the oem collapsible stock and a 7 round magazine tube. There may be other options and models out there. Benelli has a European model with a slightly longer barrel. There is also a redesigned M4A1 that has been floated that uses the Supernova collapsible stock and has a railed handguard assembly from the factory. I don’t think these options have been imported to America yet.
  3. 2 points
    The model shown is a Cerakote model H2O. You can tell by the black bolt carrier. A true H2O was NP3 plated by Robar back in the day. These aren’t made anymore and Robar is now out of business. Other places can have the NP3 finish applied, but you’ll have to do it yourself. the easiest way to tell which model it is is by looking at the bolt carrier or the receiver extension. The NP3 models will be plated silver on both those parts. The Cerakote model is simply out to copy the look of a true H2O.
  4. 2 points
    Great range report! Has anyone taken a shotgun course at Front Site? I've completed their 4-day defensive handgun class and it was good training. I've posted the attached before and hopefully it is helpful for those seeking weight reduction as this thread mentions. The "Reduction/Addition" columns reflect what I have changed out since I first added all the accessories to the gun. Such as, getting rid of the Mesa side saddle for a Vang Comp and replacing the Nordic 7 round mag tube with a CC tube. Weights of other components like handguards really helped me decide to stay with the OEM foregrips; besides I like the way they grip. M4 Accessory Weights (4).xlsx
  5. 1 point
    Don't know if it matters in your research but, mine is a 2014 Robar H20 that came with the 3 position receiver extension, solid pistol grip stock, aluminum trigger housing, 2 port barrel with the seating ring design, all the stuff you listed in the above 11707 model but mine is a 11718. If you're interested.
  6. 1 point
    Finally an easier solution for adding a Limbsaver to the Benelli M4 is available. This is significantly easier and requires fewer parts in the past assemblies of the 10111 model that required the Noveske adapter plate that is no longer sold. For this assembly we'll be using the Limbsaver 10403. This model has a raised lip on the inside of the buttpad that helps center the pad on the stock. First step is to remove the collapsible stock from your shotgun. You will then need to remove the factory buttpad by using a philips screw driver and inserting it in to the two small holes on the factory buttpad. Use a little oil or spit on the driver to help push it in. Push the driver in firmly as you unscrew the fasteners. Pull the buttpad away from the stock as you unscrew it. The screws will remain captive inside of the buttpad. Not the large hole roughly in the center of the stock. This is where the receiver extension passes thru the stock and in to the buttpad when the stock is in the fully collapsed position. The next step is to fit your buttpad to the stock. I had to purchase screws from the hardware store to make this buttpad work for this application. I used M4 machine screws, 0.7 thread pitch, 16mm in length. You will need two of them. The ones I bought use a 2.5mm allen head driver. Press the screws in to the Limbsaver buttpad through the two holes in the rubber. Use your driver to press since it will have to push past the rubber. They will snap in to place once seated. You'll see the threads sticking out of the bottom of the buttpad. Screw the buttpad on to the stock. Note the two holes top and bottom for accessing the screws. Now we need to make a hole in the plastic base of the buttpad for the receiver extension to pass in to. Now that you have the pad attached to the stock, you'll want to get a Sharpie marker with the cap off and drop it down the hole of the collapsible stock where the receiver extension goes. I use a silver one since it makes it easier to see the marks. I shake the stock around a little to get the marker to give me a witness mark as to where I am going to drill. Now remove the buttpad from the stock and check your witness marks. You should have something like this. You now know roughly where you need to drill your 7/8" hole. Rather than trying to bore that big of a hole in one pass, you'll have better luck starting small and moving up. I start with a 1/4" Forester bit and drill it out on a drill press. You do not want to drill all the way through the buttpad. You only want to drill through the plastic back which will open up to a void inside the buttpad. I suppose you could drill this out with a electric drill, but your quality of work is likely going to suffer. First hole is drilled. Take the pad and offer it back up to the stock. Look down the hole where the receiver extension goes down with a flash light and see how close to center your hole is to the hole you're looking down. I see that I'm a little off center to the right of the screen. No problem. Move to the next size up bit 3/8" and try to correct for the alignment. Continue through the 1/2, 5/8 and finally the 7/8 bit. Here is the end results. Clean out all the plastic debris from inside the buttpad and clean up the edges. I use a deburring tool but you don't have to get that fancy. Offer the buttpad up to the stock again and check to see if you can see the sides of the buttpad through the hole. You should be looking straight in to the hole drilled. If an edge is present, it will liely contact the receiver extension and prevent it from collapsing. You can hog out the hole slightly with no ill effects on performance. Finally offer up the stock with the buttpad screwed in place to the shotgun and see if the stock fully collapses. If it hangs up, you need to remove the offending area. If it fits, finalize the installation by applying some blue Loctite 243 to the screws then snug them up. No retard strength is needed. These threaded holes will strip easily if you muscle it. Use your fingers to hole the buttpad in alignment to the stock as you tighten it. There is a small amount of wiggle room in the pad that will allow you to even out the alignment. Make sure everything still fits after you've tightened the screws. The rubber of the Limbsaver will often times have a dried out look to it. You can rub some lubricant on the rubber with a rag and it will return it to a deep black finish. Limbsaver claims you'll see a 70% reduction in perceived recoil with these pads. That figure is a little optimistic. Realistically I'd say you'll see a 40% reduction.
  7. 1 point
    Absolutely. The finish is as near perfect as I think it can get, and the tube itself is amazing. Super light, perfect threads. It looks amazing on the gun.
  8. 1 point
  9. 1 point
    Everything is inflated and scarce right now. I am surprised nobody has made one domestically.
  10. 1 point
    Benelli recommends 1 1/8 oz minimums in the 3.5" guns. Shot 1 1/8 oz loads at a shooting event this week, the SBE 3 shot over a case of shells perfectly by many different operators. The gun will shoot 1 oz under the right conditions.
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