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Problem: Replace Carrier Latch Left hand M2


billybobtuff
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So, I can see how everybody says, "Replace the carrier latch" as if it were simple. It would be on a righty. Unfortunately on a lefty there is no apparent way to approach the pin with a punch. Righty's have that ejection port providing easy access to drive the carrier latch pin down (or up, take yer pick). Not so on the lefty. Any of you got an idea?

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So, I can see how everybody says, "Replace the carrier latch" as if it were simple. It would be on a righty. Unfortunately on a lefty there is no apparent way to approach the pin with a punch. Righty's have that ejection port providing easy access to drive the carrier latch pin down (or up, take yer pick). Not so on the lefty. Any of you got an idea?

 

Not having a lefty you will have to take it with a grain of salt but in the parts manual it looks as though there is a retaining spring at the bottom of the pin holding the carrier latch pin.

 

Once that was out of the way if I had the choice I would drive the pin up into the ejection port if that was possible.

 

Pictures would help if you could post them.

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Problem is, the ejection port opening is on the opposite side of the receiver from the carrier latch. In other words, the lefty isn't a mirror of the righty. I've got no place to drive the pin up, and cant get at it from above to drive it down. I will play with the photo angle, but I'm on the road, and limited to a blackberry phone cam. I've got the M2 with me though, along with some other trade goods.

I do (very much) appreciate the thought you've got in my problem.

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Guest cleefurd

I've tried Google search. No luck. Have you shown a light with a magnifier to see if that pin has any sort of threaded retrieval hole on the visible side? I'm trying to envision what might exist from an engineering perspective that would address the removal requirement. Also, is it possible that it can be walked out with inertia, by striking with a plastic mallet on the side you want it to come towards, while all spring tension is held neutral, and any encumberances removed?

Just a few thoughts. Theres a pin like that in the Ruger MKiii's that can only be removed with inertia.

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Guest cleefurd

Begads!!! A roll pin in a BLIND hole ???!!! What was Benelli thinking ?

 

Have you tried speaking with a tech at Benelli USA ??? Not a fun prospect I know, but I have called them a time or two, and they are accessible. Hopefully they won't mention drills, EDM burns, or easy-out extractors though.:eek:

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Problem is, the ejection port opening is on the opposite side of the receiver from the carrier latch. In other words, the lefty isn't a mirror of the righty. I've got no place to drive the pin up, and cant get at it from above to drive it down.

 

The carrier latch pin is a roll pin (0.10), probably 0.75 inch long. Inertia isn't going to move it. It is going to need some persuasion. Thanks.

 

Bleh, I thought for sure that there would be a small hole on the back of the receiver to push the pin up or getting the retaining spring off would let the pin "fall out".

 

I'm with cleefurd, probably time to call benelli CS and get what the theory is anyway.

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receiver.png

 

Here is a clip. I cannot see where there is anything but friction holding that roll pin in. No retaining gadget. Imagine the ejection port being on the other side, with everything else being the same and you can quickly see that part #67 presents a problem to get out, eg. no hole in the port opening.

CS has been helpful in helping me get the parts. I got them the second try. But I can see that they wouldn't have been conversant in my problem.

To be fair, Cleefurd, it really isn't a blind hole. I can drive the pin maybe 3/16" up into the groove in which the bolt ear rides. Get my handy little dremel out and cut it off, drive it again, cut, etc; until I finally wear it out. Don't want to do that. I fear I'll be forced into 1) dremel tool escapade, 2) send it to Benelli, or 3) trade it for some other sap to deal with. No good options.

I'm thinking about starting another thread with my favorite theory for the cause of this malfunction. It seems it happens just enough to others that the post might be useful, and maybe someone at Benelli might. . . . WELL IT COULD HAPPEN!

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Here is a clip. I cannot see where there is anything but friction holding that roll pin in. No retaining gadget.

 

Here is what I got out of the parts manual and it shows a retaining spring (#155E) so I thought that might go a bit to help you out but if it isnt there then you might be up a very brown creek as it were...

 

LH.jpg

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Guest cleefurd
Here is what I got out of the parts manual and it shows a retaining spring (#155E) so I thought that might go a bit to help you out but if it isnt there then you might be up a very brown creek as it were...

 

LH.jpg

155E is the "encumberance" I was referencing. If your pin is held in place by that retainer, then it is not a pressed/driven roll-pin. Try to "balance" the spring tension (58B) while tapping the lower edge with a plastic or leather mallet once 155E is removed. Using many LIGHT strikes is better than wailing on it. If there is even the tiniest vent hole above the pin on the inside of the receiver, then a shot of air can force it out the bottom too. That retaining pin (155E) is very encouraging, and what I imagined when I read agm65ccip's 1st suggestion. 156E is almost certainly slip fit or they wouldn't even bother the "155E" part.

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You guys rock! While I can't get to the shotgun, I do have a memory of a very narrow (less than 1/2 mm) mystery slot in about the right place inside the receiver. I didn't investigate it or it's reason. But, a retainer has to be there - else, it would be an engineering screwup you wouldn't expect. I'm marveling at the fact you found a detail schematic of a lefty. Can't wait to get my hands on that rascal and figure out how to get that teensie little retainer out. Probably ought to do it in a plastic bubble so I can find it after it springs free! (and no, I won't drive the roll pin back in!)

 

Thanks jillions!

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I'm marveling at the fact you found a detail schematic of a lefty.

 

Benelliusa isnt as good a resource for manuals as it could be. The Italian benelli site is much better.

 

http://benelliarmi.it/Articoli/Download.asp?Type=SPL&IDArma=72

 

Here is where you can find parts manuals, the operation manuals can be found here too just navigate to the right section on the left (helps immensely if your browser can translate italian to english ;) )

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AGM65CCIP and CLEEFURD, I hope you might enjoy hearing about the results of your efforts. My problem and the need to get some help with getting a carrier latch in a left hand M2 stemmed from a periodic feed failure. Details, pics, discussion in the following threads:

 

http://www.benelliusa.com/forum/showthread.php?t=20633

 

http://www.benelliusa.com/forum/showthread.php?t=20660

 

Well, thanks to your advice and research, changing the latch was a piece of cake. (I am sorry I was a bit bullheaded about what I believed to be true). It took longer to get retrieve my cleaning/tool gunbox and dissasemble than to remove and replace. Close comparison of old and new parts reveal no discernable difference.

 

Took the M2 to the sporting range for the "proof" test. Sure enough, first pair the blinkin' thing failed just as if nothing was changed. However, the remainder of the course the M2 performed flawlessly; as it did later in the afternoon as I reconciled some differences with some offensive ground squirrels. It just may be (and I knock on wood) that the problem is remedied. Thanks for your thoughtfulness and patience.

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Took the M2 to the sporting range for the "proof" test. Sure enough, first pair the blinkin' thing failed just as if nothing was changed. However, the remainder of the course the M2 performed flawlessly; as it did later in the afternoon as I reconciled some differences with some offensive ground squirrels. It just may be (and I knock on wood) that the problem is remedied. Thanks for your thoughtfulness and patience.

 

Nice, hopefully you will be as trouble-free as jed at this point. It is interesting that you say there isn't a big difference between the new and old parts, seems a little touchy...

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Guest cleefurd
AGM65CCIP and CLEEFURD...

Well, thanks to your advice and research, changing the latch was a piece of cake..

 

It was AGM65CCIP that got us on the right sheet of music.

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