Jump to content
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...
Benelli Forums

Clayman

Members
  • Content Count

    12
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Community Reputation

10 Good

About Clayman

  • Rank
    Junior Member
  • Birthday 09/09/1956
  1. Clayman

    Vinci's plastic...

    I agree Goose! I've had my Vinci since May and the more I shoot this shotgun the more I love it! It's light, well manored and snaps to the shoulder like an old companion. The gun is extremely well made with outstanding fit and finish. I have well over a thousand rounds through mine without any problem what-so-ever! This gun is extremely well designed yet elogantly simple in operation. Beyond being a constant performer, I can break this gun down in less than 10 seconds and cleanup maintenance is a breeze.Thats important to an old school gun lover like me! All this is good but the best feature of the Vinci is that it's just plain fun to shoot and isn't that what it's all about? Hoping you get your limit; -Clayman
  2. The M2 and vinci are very similar. They are 2 similar priced 3" benelli hunting shotguns. No doubt its new but not revolutionary to me. Maybe it is revolutionary to you. This is what it would take in my book to make a revolutionary shotgun: http://www.kriss-tdi.com/products/technology-overview.html Trap – First, I’d like to thank you for the link to your “revolutionary” shotgun. You’re not really serious, are you? Let’s look under the hood! The below verbiage is pasted directly from the link you supplied! It’s actually pretty funny! And you objected to the Benelli hype!?!! Get a load of this! Note: these guys claim to be making “the first major breakthrough in weapons operating systems in more than 120 years, yet they can’t spell “competitive” correctly on their website!!! Be that as it may, let’s look at the KRISS mystery shotgun and Vinci’s recoil and muzzle lift claims and compare! The KRISS “the KRISS Super V System, will reduce felt recoil and barrel elevation by as much as 50% over competitve gas or mechanically-operated auto-loaders and will be the fastest-cycling and lightest weapon in its class.” The Vinci “To accomplish this Benelli developed the ComfortTech™ Plus system, which decreases muzzle climb by 14- to 42-percent and quickens recovery time to let you get back on target 40- to 68-percent faster than the competition… In recent lab tests, the competition had up to 72-percent more felt recoil than the Vinci.” If the KRISS and Benelli websites are correct, the KRISS is more like the M-2 than the Vinci as the M-2 has “A new stock system that reduces felt recoil by as much as 48% over the competition”. (48% is closer to 50%) So Trap – Now I’m confused. First you say the Vinci isn’t “revolutionary” because it’s like an M-2 – Though lab test show the Vinci has 72% less recoil than the competition while providing up to 42% less muzzle rise. Yet the KRISS SUPER SYSTEM – The self proclaimed first breakthrough in over 120 years, yields reduced recoil and barrel elevation up to 50%? When I went to school 72% was less recoil than “up to 50%”? But the almighty KRISS is revolutionary… ?? Sure it is. Whatever it is that you rednecks are smoking, you need to start sharing it. Lastly, the website says: “please stay tuned to this site and look for the introduction of the KRISS MVS 12ga. at the 2008 ShotShow in Las Vegas..” I hate to break this to you, but it’s almost July of 2009 and no KRISS shotgun but the Vinci is available today and has better specs! I guess creating a shotgun with 50% less felt recoil isn’t as revolutionary or easy as misspelling the word “competitive” on the website. Here’s my point. All the self proclaimed expert bloggers that have ripped the Vinci do it on a purely emotional response. They have never fired a Vinci, taken it into a field or a range and use it. When pressed, their arguments evaporate into a diva centric void of illogical emotion. If I didn’t know better, I’d swear you’re my wife and she had been penning your diatribe! Be that as it may, whenever KRISS comes of age I hope Trap and KRISS have many faithful years together. Let the Revolution Begin! -Clayman
  3. You missed my point. If you're shooting in a competition, you probably do this quite frequently. If you took someone who doesn't shoot regularly and they fed 300 rounds through an 12 gauge over/under do you think their shoulder would be sore? You know it would be! Not so much with the Vinci and that's my point. And that is remarkable. -Clayman
  4. The Vinci might not be your cup of tea, but then the vast majority of people can’t do the things you claim to do! I also think you’re wrong on a couple of points. First, I think you’re wrong about the inertia system in the Vinci as it doesn’t resemble the inertia system in any other gun. Moreover, your comparisons of the Vinci and the M2 couldn’t be more non sequitur. Beyond this, you’ve maintain the Vinci isn’t revolutionary . You’ve repeated this so many times, I’m sure everyone is wondering exactly what your vision of ‘revolutionary’ is. Frankly, I don’t think you know what the word means. To save you some time, let me tell you the definition of the word you bandy about so frequently with denial. Revolutionary: Markedly new or introducing radical change From it’s modular components to it’s inertia cycling system there isn’t another shotgun on the planet that resembles the Vinci. That’s a far cry from the over-under and gas operated autos flooding the market. The truth is that the Vinci is, by definition, revolutionary. It’s markedly new, different and the module component introduces a radical change in the market design for shotguns. Now, you may not like the hype, or the looks or anything else about the gun and that’s ok by me. But to parrot the same old rhetoric found elsewhere on the internet is sorely telling. So now we’re curious! If the Vinci isn’t markedly new and doesn’t introduce a radical change, exactly what would it take in your book to produce a revolutionary shotgun? -Clayman
  5. First, let me say that I am in love with the looks of the Vinci. All of the comments I’ve received on the looks are positive. People see it in the gunrack and always walk over to it to get a better look. When I say it’s ok for them to pick it up, the always flash a smile when they shoulder it and then the positive comments start, mostly centering on how unbelievably light it is and how good it feels. Wow.. is generally the term used. I’ve never heard anything but glowing remarks on the gun’s looks. Most say it’s just plain wicked looking. I agree. And I also agree it takes more than “Wow” to make a gun revolutionary. For me, the revolutionary part about this gun is the ergonomics, the light weight, light recoil and the way this gun shoots. It’s the whole package, not just one or two features about the gun. Case-in-point: Last weekend I shot 11 rounds of skeet and dropped over 300 rounds through my Vinci and my shoulder wasn’t even tender Monday. Try doing that with your 12 gauge over-under!! Go ahead- I dare ya! I also like the balance and weight of this gun. Being as light as it is, you can spend the weekend in the field or on the skeet range with very little fatigue. It does take a bit of getting use to cause it swings so easy. Notwithstanding the fact that I can also break the gun down into 3 modules in 10 seconds or reassemble it almost as quickly. Does all of this qualify as revolutionary? Who cares!! Add it all up and you have a super light, versatile, dependable shotgun with a well mannered character that is just plain fun to shoot! Instead of focusing on the Benelli hype why don’t you take a deep breath and actually pull a Vinci to the shoulder and get out in the field or break a few clays with it. You might have a little fun and that just may be revolutionary. -Clayman
  6. The Vinci comes with 4 shims. After some experimenting I settled on the C shim. The Vinci is an awesome piece and will remain my favorite for some time.
  7. The more I shoot this gun the better I love it .This feeling seems to be universal from everything I have read. The more people actually use this gun the more they love it. Why? The recoil reminds me of the 20 gauge I had as a kid but that's where the similarities end. Recoil and subsequent target acquisition is a well mannered and controlled. I’m also a huge fan of the trigger group ergonomics on this shotgun. The trigger pull is uniform, clean and consistent in a manner usually reserved for shotguns reworked at the gunsmith. Bringing this level of sophistication to a 6 pound 12 gauge shotgun is quite an accomplishment. This enables the Vinci to move from the field to the skeet range with a consistent character that will bring a smile to your face. The fit and finish on the gun is superb and it cycles everything I’ve thrown at it without a jam or complaint. I can take down this gun in 10 seconds and it is the easiest gun to clean that I have ever owned so clean-up is a breeze. This shotgun is the end-product of innovative engineering and quality manufacturing and while some moan loudly about the price tag, you get what you pay for. Simplicity in design yet elegant between the hands, this shotgun snaps to the shoulder like a lifelong companion. I was stunned to read all the negative comments about the way the gun looks! I never knew there were so many fashion divas out there shooting shotguns! Interestingly, all the negative comments I’ve read about the gun come from people who have never actually seen one, held one or fired it – That’s telling! I’ve gone through well over a couple dozen boxes of shells now and haven’t had any problems whatsoever. The Vinci is a constant performer. Beyond all this, I love the Vinci because it’s a joy to shoot – And isn’t that what it’s all about?
  8. When I first saw a picture of the Vinci, I just thought it looked different. That said, I’ve since warmed up to the looks. But I’m the kind of guy that’s more focused on performance than looks. I must admit I was really surprised by all the crying over the looks of the Vinci! I never knew there were so many fashion divas out there shooting shotguns!
  9. At the skeet range today I fed 4 boxes of shells through my Vinci and my shoulder isn’t sore one bit. This gun does a whole lot of things right! Recoil is well mannered and controlled as advertized. I’m also a huge fan of the trigger group ergonomics on this shotgun. Moreover, the C shim has really improved the drop for me. Interestingly, I also received a few compliments on the looks of the gun today. Of course, one must remember all the negative comments about the Vinci’s looks come from people who have never actually seen one, held one or fired it – Go figure. I’ve gone through well over a couple dozen boxes of shells now and haven’t had any problems whatsoever. The Vinci is a constant performer handling everything I’ve thrown at it. The more I shoot this gun the better I love it .This feeling seems to be universal from everything I have read. The more people use this gun the more they love it.
  10. Getting the Vinci actually makes a lot of sense. Most of the guns mentioned in this thread (391 and 1100) retail for almost the same as a black Vinci and in my opinion, the Vinci surpasses these guns by a wide margin. For approximately $1,300 (Street Price) you get a hands down winner that can not only excel on the trap range, but do a host of other things exceptionally well. The Vinci recoil reminds me of the 20 gauge I had as a kid but that's where the similarities end. Recoil and subsequent target acquisition is a well mannered and controlled. I’m also a huge fan of the trigger group ergonomics on this shotgun. The trigger pull is uniform, clean and consistent in a manner usually reserved for shotguns reworked at the gunsmith. Bringing this level of sophistication to a 6 pound 12 gauge shotgun is quite an accomplishment. This enables the Vinci to move from the field to the skeet, trap or sporting clay range with a consistent character that will bring a smile to your face. The fit and finish on the gun is superb and it cycles everything I’ve thrown at it without a jam or complaint. Clean-up is a breeze. I can take down this gun in 10 seconds and it is the easiest gun to clean that I have ever owned. Try that with a gas gun. Beyond all this, you're going to love the Vinci because it’s a joy to shoot. Someone else put it best when they said that the biggest problem they had with the Vinci was keeping it loaded! The longer I have this gun the bestter I like it – And isn’t that what it’s all about?
  11. I bought Vinci off the internet from Jaqua's Fine Guns. Good people and they are selling the Vinci at a reasonable price. There is a lot written about the vinci in these forums and the internet about the vinci, but almost ALL the negitive posts are from people who have never actually seen one, held it in their hands or shot it. The people who have actually fired one absolutely love it. =Go Figure=
×
×
  • Create New...