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Here is an overview of where I hunt: The property consists of a large hay field overlooking a hardwood ridge with a creek at the bottom. On the other side of the creek is the property line and another hay field. On top I have a 150x75 yard alfalfa/clover field surrounded by a 5' wide cedar/brush fence row. I built a blind in the corner of the fence row 32 yards from where the birds enter, which is a trail heavily marked with gobbler tracks and droppings. Just on the other side of this field it rolls down hill with 30 yards of cedars and briars, then 80 yards of hardwoods until it hits the creek. The birds roost in these hardwoods, between the horizon and midway down the ridge, and sometimes (not sure what time of day) feed in the alfalfa field. Last year I set up on the creek and they all flew over the fence and into the other hay field....POW, neighbor filled his tag! Should I set up in the fence row inside of the field, down in the cedars, or try to slide down into the hardwoods? I'm a newbie and don't know if they can be called uphill into the alfalfa field after fly-down.

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Originally posted by 69beers:

Here is an overview of where I hunt: The property consists of a large hay field overlooking a hardwood ridge with a creek at the bottom. On the other side of the creek is the property line and another hay field. On top I have a 150x75 yard alfalfa/clover field surrounded by a 5' wide cedar/brush fence row. I built a blind in the corner of the fence row 32 yards from where the birds enter, which is a trail heavily marked with gobbler tracks and droppings. Just on the other side of this field it rolls down hill with 30 yards of cedars and briars, then 80 yards of hardwoods until it hits the creek. The birds roost in these hardwoods, between the horizon and midway down the ridge, and sometimes (not sure what time of day) feed in the alfalfa field. Last year I set up on the creek and they all flew over the fence and into the other hay field....POW, neighbor filled his tag! Should I set up in the fence row inside of the field, down in the cedars, or try to slide down into the hardwoods? I'm a newbie and don't know if they can be called uphill into the alfalfa field after fly-down.

definately a good idea to try calling them uphill. Sounds like this piece of property is a tough little spot to hunt and can go either way. I would try setting up a decoy in the field and using a tree yelp before fly down. This way they no were you are and the decoys are in place to let them see something. Just a few suggestions. Remember they say bet on the turkey. Goodluck.
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69beers-I would say it depends on the turkeys. First if you have a wound up gobbler who is roosted with no hens,..he will go up a hill, under a fence, and walk through a creek or fly over a river to get to a "receptive" hen (you). Otherwise the turkeys seem to be consistent when they are undisturbed. If you pay attention you will notice they may have a pattern of flying down into the timber, and then working into the field later in the day. Whatever they normally tend to do, you should set up where they usually like to go.

 

One other thing you may notice,...sometimes it seems like they go away from one day, and when you set up where they went the day before and now they go the opposite way,...it is usually because you are calling too aggressively or the gobblers are with a hen(s) that don't want competition. In that case, I would stick a decoy in the ground and cluck a few times every 20-30 minutes.

 

One thing that is predictable, they will be unpredictable. The most consistent behavior I have seen from turkeys is their propensity to head towards fields when it starts raining. If you think it may rain, just wait in that field and I guarantee they will get there sometime.

 

The last bit of advice/encouragement I would give is to be patient and keep going out. If you are in an area that has birds, you will usually be successful if you hunt long, pay attention to their habits, and do not give up.

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