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Super Black Eagle 3 for a Multipurpose Shotgun.


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Hello everyone, I'm new to the forum and new to shotgunning in general, and had a couple of questions about shotgun selection. As a left eye dominant shooter, I use all my long guns left handed, and after getting a left handed AR from Stag I'm dead set on using purpose built left handed guns from here on out. 

So, I've saved up just over $2,000 to spend on a really nice left handed semi auto shotgun that I can use for 3 gun, deer/hog hunting, and to learn clay shooting and bird hunting.  After handling a Super Black Eagle 3 that fit like an old glove, I had my heart set on it until I read some troubling reviews online.  

My questions are these: do the newer models of the SBE3 still have major POI  problems, and if not, is it a good gun for using in multiple disciplines, or is it too focused on waterfowling and bird hunting to be utilized as a jack of all trades?

 

 

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11 hours ago, NewBenelliShooter said:

Hello everyone, I'm new to the forum and new to shotgunning in general, and had a couple of questions about shotgun selection. As a left eye dominant shooter, I use all my long guns left handed, and after getting a left handed AR from Stag I'm dead set on using purpose built left handed guns from here on out. 

So, I've saved up just over $2,000 to spend on a really nice left handed semi auto shotgun that I can use for 3 gun, deer/hog hunting, and to learn clay shooting and bird hunting.  After handling a Super Black Eagle 3 that fit like an old glove, I had my heart set on it until I read some troubling reviews online.  

My questions are these: do the newer models of the SBE3 still have major POI  problems, and if not, is it a good gun for using in multiple disciplines, or is it too focused on waterfowling and bird hunting to be utilized as a jack of all trades?

 

 

The Super Black Eagle would be a fine all purpose, there could be other considerations in models if you do not plan on shooting 3.5" shells.  Most POI issues can be traced to improper fitting, basic understanding of POA VS POI, and very few 17 model year guns which the barrel stop ring was improperly installed.  Most Benelli models shoot a 60/40 pattern high, with that being the standard.

Most modern ribbed semi automatics are designed to shoot a pattern higher than the point of aim.  Benelli tolerance is up to 5" high at 21 yards.  Most guns will be on the lower side of this delta.  This means the point of impact will be up to 5" high the majority of the pattern.

This assumes that the gun fits the owner, a good fit requires a flat rib.  This can be done with the drop shim plate and corresponding shims, cast and drop. Unfortunately most shooters do not take the time to fit their gun properly.  Of the more than 900 Benelli's that I have worked on less than 40 have different Drop Shim Plates and shims that were different than the OEM setup.  This certainly does not mean the other 860 guns do not fit the shooter properly.

Your POI can be lowered by using a larger front sight such and Hi Viz and similar - as well.

There were some SBE 3's in the early 2017 that had POI out of spec.  This condition COULD have been caused by the magazine tube barrel stop ring that improperly set to spec.  The barrel stop ring primary function is to work and assist in alignment of the barrel as it is secured into the receiver.  It is vital that these to points of contact are precisely met at the same time, if not the barrel is forced out of position or it is simply to loose to secure the barrel assembly.  Most Benelli models do not even use the barrel stop ring.  The SBE 3 and some M2's do.  20 Gauge M2's do not use the barrel stop ring.

I randomly sample SBE 3's with a laser sight as well as having access to SBE 3's performance shop patterns that were done by Rob Roberts all of which have a POI higher than the POA.    The good news is that altering your shotgun’s POI can lead to more accurate and consistent shots.

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Thank you, remarkable, for the detailed and informative answer.  Sounds to me like the SBE3 has a 6'o clock hold in pistol terms, which should be good for me, because that's what I prefer.  

For proper fit, is it best to find an expert to help me, or is it something that I can attempt myself?  

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Absolutely is a multipurpose shotgun.

I have had the original Super Black Eagle since '94. Before I had numerous shotguns, each with their specific role/season. The problem was that every time I switched seasons, it took me a bit to adjust to the new fit, feel, and point of impact. I read about a semi-auto shotgun that could shoot 2.75", 3", and 3.5" mags in any order, without adjustment. That I was intrigued was an understatement. I drove 5 hours (each way) to the closest retailer that had one in stock. Though I couldn't afford the price then of $1,000, I knew I had to have one. So, I saved my pennies and worked some overtime and finally bought it. After I had a chance to really try it out on the various seasons, I started selling off the other guns it was replacing it. So, for many years, I had this 12 gauge and a .410 for the misses to shoot. I later bought a semi-pistol gripped stock, extended magazine, and different length barrels for it so it could truly adapt. I even eventually bought a slug barrel with modified forearm as well. I have said before that if some catastrophe happened and I was only allowed one gun, it would be this one. No question...

After I got older and had more discretionary income, I also started adding other Benelli shotguns to the stable. Now I've got M1's, M3T's, M4's, a Montefeltro, etc. I really love the inertia action. Even though many (probably most) on here seem to prefer the M4, I still like inertia over gas operated. However, these are really all just toys. When I head out to bring home dinner, the 26 year old SBE is what I always grab. So yes, the SBE can absolutely be one of the most multipurpose firearms that I know of. It has all this capability and versatility without being very heavy either. It is lighter than most of its contemporaries.

1800466152_SBEwithtext-small.thumb.jpg.f001b4388e10bc3b25fe0bac155d340c.jpg

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Wow bambihunter, that's awesome that your sbe has been so good for so long; that gun's older than I am!  I think I'm gonna go ahead and order a left handed 26" barrel one though my local store. Hopefully the wait on it is less than 4 months so I can get out there before the season starts. 

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Glad to hear it. Benelli's are a perfect example of "buy once, cry once" product. They are expensive, but for me, they have been perfect. I hope they are for you as well. That length is a great option. I had forgot to mention barrel length (and why I have the full barrel set). I originally bought my SBE with a 28" barrel with the old "wisdom" was that longer barrels gave more velocity and tighter groups. While that is true to a point, it isn't everything. My 28" gave me TOO tight of patterns. I rarely shot above modified choke for any game. Anyway, the 26" that you are choosing is the perfect length I think for general use with the SBE's. They have a longer receiver than many of the conventional guns you may have grown up shooting. This is largely due to the 3.5" capability, but they are slightly longer than the few 3.5" guns I've directly compared it to. That extra inch plus in the receiver makes it feel like the next size longer barrel.

I only have used the 24" barrel in that set above for turkey hunting. After shooting 28" for 20 years, I swing the 24" too fast on moving targets. The 26" seems perfect to me. I honestly do not know why my 28" barrel is so tight. I've even tried different chokes on it with minimal change. My best friend just shakes his head when I can consistently drop doves 10 yards further than he'll even take a shot.

I don't know if you hunt big game as well, and what the related hunting requirements in your area might be, but it might be worth considering a slug barrel too. I've got one for mine, and a 2x7x32 scope on detachable mounts so I can use open sights or scope. I have thought a little bit about getting a red dot or something for it but I doubt I will as I don't really use this gun for defense.

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