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Forgive me for being a sissy...


LilRedMeanie
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I just bought my first shotgun a few days ago, tried it out today for the first time. Benelli Nova 20g with the youth stock (for my short womanly arms lol). Well let me tell you, my shoulder KILLS and I have a little bruise. Boyfriend said I was holding the gun right, but I don't think so, so I may need tips on that. Also, having a hard time finding good recoil pads for this gun. I know I probably sound like a sissy asking about recoil pads for a 20g yeah yeah but whatever. I see a lot about the Comfortech Gel Pads for the Nova, but is it specifically for the 12g? And does it matter if it has the youth stock on it? So lost, someone help!:confused:

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I know you don't want to hear this, but that particular gun is going to have a little punch no matter what you do to it. A new recoil pad may or may not help. Consider LOP (length of pull) issues if you add another pad. It's worth a try. I had one I bought for my wife and she did not like it because of recoil. She now has 20 gauge 391 gas gun and is happy.

 

On the other hand, it is perfectly normal to have a sore shoulder if you're a new shooter or laid off for a year. When I brought out my M2 this year for the first time, my shoulder was bruised and tender for about a week. I adjusted--you will too. If you're going to keep the gun, don't worry....it will get better.... I would let my bruise heal and then start over. Let that heal and start over. You're shoulder should be good then. Good luck

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I know you don't want to hear this, but that particular gun is going to have a little punch no matter what you do to it. A new recoil pad may or may not help. Consider LOP (length of pull) issues if you add another pad. It's worth a try. I had one I bought for my wife and she did not like it because of recoil. She now has 20 gauge 391 gas gun and is happy.

 

On the other hand, it is perfectly normal to have a sore shoulder if you're a new shooter or laid off for a year. When I brought out my M2 this year for the first time, my shoulder was bruised and tender for about a week. I adjusted--you will too. If you're going to keep the gun, don't worry....it will get better.... I would let my bruise heal and then start over. Let that heal and start over. You're shoulder should be good then. Good luck

 

Oh I plan on keeping the gun, and using it every year. It seems like my stance isn't right, and I was holding the buttpad more on the bone of my shoulder, not the pocket. I do have to say the buttpad that's on it is not very forgiving or comfortable for that matter. Something a tad bit softer or mushier (correct wording?) Would be super helpful.

 

I shot 25 rounds thru it yesterday and only have a small bruise on the bone of my shoulder. If it helps I was only shooting remington 2 3/4inch 7/8oz size 7 1/2shot.

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Oh I plan on keeping the gun, and using it every year. It seems like my stance isn't right, and I was holding the buttpad more on the bone of my shoulder, not the pocket. I do have to say the buttpad that's on it is not very forgiving or comfortable for that matter. Something a tad bit softer or mushier (correct wording?) Would be super helpful.

 

I shot 25 rounds thru it yesterday and only have a small bruise on the bone of my shoulder. If it helps I was only shooting remington 2 3/4inch 7/8oz size 7 1/2shot.

 

Sounds like you may have a stock placement issue. That will get better with practice and someone watching you shoot. You're going to be sore no matter what you do because you are a new shooter. It will get better the more you shoot. I would not change the gun yet.....maybe it will get better. After market recoil pads are sometimes over-rated.

 

One other thing, are you shooting clay or skeet? If on a clay course you will not notice recoil as much because you're focusing on targets and not recoil (kind of like hunting). If you're shooting cans in the back yard or someone is throwing targets with a hand thrower, you will feel every shot. If you're shooting 7/8 loads, you can't do anymore there...you just have to get use to it.

 

Good luck.....jed

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Sounds like you may have a stock placement issue. That will get better with practice and someone watching you shoot. You're going to be sore no matter what you do because you are a new shooter. It will get better the more you shoot. I would not change the gun yet.....maybe it will get better. After market recoil pads are sometimes over-rated.

 

One other thing, are you shooting clay or skeet? If on a clay course you will not notice recoil as much because you're focusing on targets and not recoil (kind of like hunting). If you're shooting cans in the back yard or someone is throwing targets with a hand thrower, you will feel every shot. If you're shooting 7/8 loads, you can't do anymore there...you just have to get use to it.

 

Good luck.....jed

 

Shooting clay. My boyfriend is very adamant about me getting used to the gun quickly as hunting season is approaching. So I'm getting used to the gun and shooting moving targets lol yay. I've shot his semiauto 1187 12g and it didn't seem to kick as much as mine, but his buttpad is much more cushiony.

 

Thanks for the advice everyone. I'm gunna be back out there this afternoon, I know what 2 main things I need to correct (stance and where on my shoulder I'm holding the gun) so we shall see how I do!

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Shooting clay. My boyfriend is very adamant about me getting used to the gun quickly as hunting season is approaching. So I'm getting used to the gun and shooting moving targets lol yay. I've shot his semiauto 1187 12g and it didn't seem to kick as much as mine, but his buttpad is much more cushiony.

 

Thanks for the advice everyone. I'm gunna be back out there this afternoon, I know what 2 main things I need to correct (stance and where on my shoulder I'm holding the gun) so we shall see how I do!

 

You need to tell him to give you the gas gun (1187) and let him shoot the pump! LOL> The gas gun will, of course, kick less no matter what recoil pad you use. That's funny and reminds me of my wife when I let her shoot the Nova, 870, M2, Citori, etc......I then gave her the 391 gas gun, which I knew was a sweet shooting gun, and she cursed at me for making her shoot the other guns. I told her she needed to understand how guns worked before she went to the Cadilac.....very funny. Now I know why I get sprayed in the dove field!

 

 

Remember: a uncomfortable gun (heavy recoil) will cause a flinch, which means a jerk, which means a missed target or bird. I small flinch will throw you way off your target. You will not notice the flinch but it's there on a gun that hurts. I've been shooting for almost 50 years and still do it when I shoot my 870 Super Mag. I'm not sure of your age, but in some cases a good sign of flinching can be a sore elbow joint after shooting. Good luck and have fun....

 

jed

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Brought the Benelli into a gunshop and a couple things were pointed out to me, that I basically already knew. I'm not leaning into the gun, I'm leaning back or completely straight. The butt is not in the correct placement on my shoulder as my boyfriend told me it was. Also, with the youth stock, its much narrower, so doesn't absorb the recoil as much. I purchased a limbsaver slipon, headed out now to try it out.

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It sounds as though there has been some good advice so far. Shotguns do bring a lot of energy to the party.

 

Here are few things I teach new shotgun shooters:

 

1. Square up to the target with your feet and shoulders. (Length of pull is important here).

2. Bend your knee's slightly.

3. Lean into the direction of the shot at your waist. Don't just stick your bottom out. Naturally lean forward.

4. Pull the gun in tight to your shoulder. Place it low in the "pocket" between your deltoids and pectoral muscles. Not up on your collar bone.

5. Now you are ready to shoot.

 

This position will get more natural over time, allowing you to throw the gun up to your shoulder, like in hunting, and achieve a good stance with as much recoil mitagation as you can.

 

Have fun! Be safe.

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It sounds as though there has been some good advice so far. Shotguns do bring a lot of energy to the party.

 

Here are few things I teach new shotgun shooters:

 

1. Square up to the target with your feet and shoulders. (Length of pull is important here).

2. Bend your knee's slightly.

3. Lean into the direction of the shot at your waist. Don't just stick your bottom out. Naturally lean forward.

4. Pull the gun in tight to your shoulder. Place it low in the "pocket" between your deltoids and pectoral muscles. Not up on your collar bone.

5. Now you are ready to shoot.

 

This position will get more natural over time, allowing you to throw the gun up to your shoulder, like in hunting, and achieve a good stance with as much recoil mitagation as you can.

 

Have fun! Be safe.

 

 

 

Low in the pocket? Now this is confusing. The guy at the gun shop at me holding it higher up.....

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Low in the pocket? Now this is confusing. The guy at the gun shop at me holding it higher up.....

 

The advice of the guy in the gun shop gave you a sore shoulder. ;)

 

I am assuming you are more petite than me (I'm a slim 270# and 6') and I can still get sore from a long day of 12ga rounds. The above works for me. I think you will find very few who recommend using a rifle/shotgun/carbine "high" on the shoulder. You will want to lower your head to the gun to get a good look at the front bead. You want as much of your mass behind the gun, as mass is the only way to medigate that recoil.

 

A picture would be worth a thousand words.

 

Here is a picture of Chris Costa from Magpul dynamics running and shooting (different in terms of stance obviously) but look at how low and "pulled in" the gun is in relation to his collar bone. He has lowered his head, not raised the gun.

 

You'll get there, try a limbsaver pad as well. The M2 recoil pad on the new Benelli's is VERY soft and nice too.

 

I'm proud of you for keeping at it, lots of people shoot a shotgun once and then move on. Keep it up!

 

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SO. Earlier today I bought the Limbsaver for the Benelli and tried it out, with the correct stance (nose over toes I was told) AND correct positioning on my shoulder. Although the guy at the gun shop told me to hold the gun higher up, it seemed silly that it was sitting on my collar bone. Instinct told me this was a no no, so I lowered the gun "deep into the pocket" as someone said earlier, and lowered my head more than bringing the gun up to my head.

 

All I can say is WOW. WHAT A DIFFERENCE. I'm SUPER pleased. I shot off 25 rounds today with no soreness or pain what-so-ever (even from yesterdays bruise, because the butt wasn't even touching that area with correct positioning). I could have kept going too!

 

Aye! So happy! Thanks to everyone for the advice!!!!

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