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Breaking in my NEW SuperNova


NuckinFuts
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As far as the gun coming with the recoil reducer or Comfortech stock, I would assume it depends on what model you ordered. There are several configs as far as I know.

 

In regards to "breaking in" your shotgun; I see no reason to use the high powered stuff right away. Im not saying that it will hurt anything, but why take any chances? Regardless of what type of ammo you start out with, I would recommend a thorough cleaning prior to shooting it for the first time. Some here say that this is not necessary. While this may be true, based on my experience, its better to start off with a fresh, clean gun than not. Personally, my Benelli had all sorts of crap in it when I first bought it.

 

As a side note, according to Benelli reps, after 20 to 30 rounds or so the gun will be considered "broken in".

Edited by shotgunNoob
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I just got a brand new supernova 12ga, my first shotgun. I took it out to a range to do some test patterning with a light 2.75" target load & it wouldn't fire.

 

I tried several different shells from 2 manufacturers (winchester 1oz 7.5 shot & estate 1&1/8 oz 7.5 shot), none would fire. Looking at the fired shells, the primers had a spot of the heavy grease on them but they weren't significantly dented in. The grease spot must be from the firing pin, which came packed in this fairly heavy black grease. Nothing in the manual mentioned cleaning it out so I didn't. Overall I fired it at least 10 times without any shells going off.

 

I called up Benelli & they suggested I try a heavier round, said that it should fire a heavier round & after a box or two should fire lighter rounds too. The CS rep said that the firing pin return spring was too stiff on a brand new gun for those light loads.

 

I'm not too savvy about the construction of shotshell, but if the firing pin return spring is so stiff that the firing pin doesn't go far enough forward to 'whack' the primer sufficiently, how will a heavier load help? Is the heavier load going to have a primer that sticks out further/is more sensitive to shock?

 

Would just dry-firing the gun some number of times (a few dozen? a few hundred?) work the spring sufficiently so that it isn't so stiff? Should I clean out the heavy grease that the firing pin came packed in? If so, should I replace it with grease, or just oil up the spring/pin/inside of the bolt assembly?

 

If I am to take the CS rep's advice (which I plan to), what sort of load would people here recommend that I use? She didn't tell me exactly what to use, just said 'heavier loads'. Heavier as in more shot, or more powder, or bigger shot, or a longer cartridge? Maybe all 4? I don't want to buy 2 boxes of expensive 3.5" magnum 00 buck or rifled slugs if I can help it ($1+/cartridge? That price hurts almost as much as the recoil would!)

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I just got a brand new supernova 12ga, my first shotgun. I took it out to a range to do some test patterning with a light 2.75" target load & it wouldn't fire.

 

I tried several different shells from 2 manufacturers (winchester 1oz 7.5 shot & estate 1&1/8 oz 7.5 shot), none would fire. Looking at the fired shells, the primers had a spot of the heavy grease on them but they weren't significantly dented in. The grease spot must be from the firing pin, which came packed in this fairly heavy black grease. Nothing in the manual mentioned cleaning it out so I didn't. Overall I fired it at least 10 times without any shells going off.

 

I called up Benelli & they suggested I try a heavier round, said that it should fire a heavier round & after a box or two should fire lighter rounds too. The CS rep said that the firing pin return spring was too stiff on a brand new gun for those light loads.

 

I'm not too savvy about the construction of shotshell, but if the firing pin return spring is so stiff that the firing pin doesn't go far enough forward to 'whack' the primer sufficiently, how will a heavier load help? Is the heavier load going to have a primer that sticks out further/is more sensitive to shock?

 

Would just dry-firing the gun some number of times (a few dozen? a few hundred?) work the spring sufficiently so that it isn't so stiff? Should I clean out the heavy grease that the firing pin came packed in? If so, should I replace it with grease, or just oil up the spring/pin/inside of the bolt assembly?

 

If I am to take the CS rep's advice (which I plan to), what sort of load would people here recommend that I use? She didn't tell me exactly what to use, just said 'heavier loads'. Heavier as in more shot, or more powder, or bigger shot, or a longer cartridge? Maybe all 4? I don't want to buy 2 boxes of expensive 3.5" magnum 00 buck or rifled slugs if I can help it ($1+/cartridge? That price hurts almost as much as the recoil would!)

 

Based on what you have presented here, I would strip the weapon down (using the Benelli owners manual as reference) and thoroughly clean it and lube it. I would also suggest taking a close look at the firing pin once you have everything pulled apart. Make sure that it, along with the spring, is CLEAN and then LIGHTLY lubricate it. Then check out its "action", along with the locking head mechanism. Maybe go out and buy a few snap caps or dummy rounds in order to effectively and safely check this (once, of course, the shotgun is re-assembled).

 

In terms of using grease for lube, I would just use a quality synthetic-type lubricant (there are many to choose from) vs grease. Sure, there are some effective grease-type lubes out there, but I feel that unless you are going to be doing a h*lluva lot of shooting or plan on storing the weapon for many, many months, it isnt necessary. But, if you insist on using grease, make sure its a very light coat.

 

In terms of what you were told about "light" rounds..I have not shot anything but Federal 2 3/4" low-recoil 00-Buck through my SuperNova tactical since I bought it brand new. I have run through about 30 -50 rounds so far without a hitch.

 

Now, it may be possible that the ammo you have tried so far just has "hard" primers. But, Im willing to bet that your gun simply needs some attentive cleaning. Give this a try and go from there. If you are still having issues, then my limited guess would be either a weak firing pin spring or possibly issues with the hammer assembly. Even though this is a new gun, its still man made.

 

BTW- Dont dry fire your shotgun without the use of snap caps or dummy rounds. Otherwise, you may wind up doing far more harm than good.

Edited by shotgunNoob
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Thanks, shotgunNoob. I consulted with a few other shotgun owning acquaintances about this as well, their assessment was similar to yours. I had cleaned/oiled the gun after I bought it, but had left the thick black grease in the bolt assembly because I wasn't sure if it was supposed to have a thicker lube in there; I figured that's the way it came so I'd leave it. Maybe it was benelli, or maybe it was the sporting goods store (scheels, they had it out on display) that I bought it from who put that thick black grease on/in the bolt assembly, but I wiped it off/washed it all out and then wiped the firing pin/spring down with cloth patches soaked in a light oil this evening. I'm going to buy a box of a bit heavier load and take it out sometime this weekend for another try.

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I'm going to be really pissed off if my gun doesnt fire at all the first time out. I will be going out with my Dad who was trying to get me to buy a SBE and he'll never quit giving me **** if it doesnt operate. I will, of course, be cleaning the **** out of my gun before it's ever fired. I have seen other guns that if fired as they were put together at the factory would have broken or destroyed parts. Always check your stuff out yourself or let someone who knows better than you check it out to make sure thats its safe if nothing else.

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Wow I can't belive you had FTF's in a Supernova. I have ran everything from Federal and Winchester value packs to Winchester 3 1/2" buckshot with no issues. If you are having problems it is either mechanical or user error with a Supernova, you don't need to use specific loads or lengths. So either the firing pin is getting hung up or is messed up all together.

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Wow I can't belive you had FTF's in a Supernova. I have ran everything from Federal and Winchester value packs to Winchester 3 1/2" buckshot with no issues. If you are having problems it is either mechanical or user error with a Supernova, you don't need to use specific loads or lengths. So either the firing pin is getting hung up or is messed up all together.

 

YUP!!!!!!!

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Like I said, it's my first shotgun so I'm not going to entirely rule out 'user error' but the operation seems pretty straightforward to me.

 

I haven't had a chance to try firing again since I cleaned out the bolt assembly/firing pin, but I do notice that even with a shell chambered the forearm has about 2 millimeters of 'give'.

 

To say another way, If I have a shell chambered & the bolt locked forward I can move the slide forward/back very slightly (~2mm), and the slide moves the bolt assembly with it (the bolt head stays locked up against the barrel opening).

 

I can probably get some pics of this and post/link to them if it would help.

 

Can another supernova owner check if theirs does this too? It could explain the failure-to-fire; if the bolt assembly was a few millimeters back then the firing pin wouldn't poke out past the bolt head as far as it should.

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To say another way, If I have a shell chambered & the bolt locked forward I can move the slide forward/back very slightly (~2mm), and the slide moves the bolt assembly with it (the bolt head stays locked up against the barrel opening).

 

I'm thinking NO. If the bolt is truely locked, then there is no ''play" in the action. Next time you go to the range, (if it doesn't work) pull back on the action and see if it goes bang. Then hold the action forward all the way and see if it goes bang.

 

Novaking

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Like I said, it's my first shotgun so I'm not going to entirely rule out 'user error' but the operation seems pretty straightforward to me.

 

I haven't had a chance to try firing again since I cleaned out the bolt assembly/firing pin, but I do notice that even with a shell chambered the forearm has about 2 millimeters of 'give'.

 

To say another way, If I have a shell chambered & the bolt locked forward I can move the slide forward/back very slightly (~2mm), and the slide moves the bolt assembly with it (the bolt head stays locked up against the barrel opening).

 

I can probably get some pics of this and post/link to them if it would help.

 

Can another supernova owner check if theirs does this too? It could explain the failure-to-fire; if the bolt assembly was a few millimeters back then the firing pin wouldn't poke out past the bolt head as far as it should.

 

My SuperNova tactical does the same thing. Just a bit of movement from the fore-end and just a bit less from the bolt, but movement for both parts is nominal. The locking head itself doesnt move at all. Either way, Ive never concerned myself with it due to the complete lack of issues after 50 rounds or more. I cant say WHY the play is there, but that it really doesnt seem to be a prob.

Edited by shotgunNoob
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  • 2 weeks later...

I finally got to go back out after all the crummy weather over the last week, & the supernova fired everything I ran through it without any problems this time.

 

I don't know if it was cleaning out all the heavy grease in the bolt, or if it was all the trigger pulls on the snap caps, but the gun works just fine now.

 

I have to say Benelli's comfortech stock, at least in my limited experience, lives up to it's promises. The 3" magnum #4 buckshot shells I shot today felt about equivalent to 2.75" target loads that I went out shooting with a friend a few months ago (in his winchester pump not sure of the model), and the 2.75" target loads I shot today felt like nothing more than a stiff push.

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