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Best cycling bird shot for Benelli M4 semiauto?


hoodfu
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So here's a video (210 frames per second) of my Benelli M4 failing to cycle Winchester #8 birdshot 12 ga rounds reliably. I'd say only 50% of them would fire and bring the bolt back hard enough to chamber another round as can be seen in the video. I also tried their #7.5 birdshot rounds and they worked about 80% of the time. I've also tried the Remington #7.5 game club rounds with the same 80% reliability. I'm shooting in a light competition on steel targets in a month or so and which requires 2.75" #7.5 or higher birdshot rounds, and I'm wondering if people have had particular luck with a certain brand/type of 12ga shell in these types of semiautos. Thanks.

 

youtube.com/watch?v=bzuC3SXXPl0

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All birdshot should fire fine.

 

Question 1) - How many rounds are through your gun? 200+?

Question 2) - Is your bolt carrier drenched in lube? Like literally, drenched.

 

I've come to believe that failure to reliably cycle birdshot comes from one of these two factors, each and every time it comes up on these forums.

 

My first M4 wouldn't cycle anything reliably for the first ~150 rounds. Buckshot, slugs, birdshot ... it would fire 3-4 rounds and have various jams on the next. It didn't have a drop of lube on it, as I was a newb and I didn't figure it would matter.

 

12000 rounds later now and I've yet to have a single malfunction after I lubed up the bolt carrier. I've cleaned it probably 4 times in all those rounds.

 

Between 3 friends and myself, after my initial "dry" m4 fail prone firing, we have purchased and broken in 4 M4's between us. Each of them has been 100% flawless out of the box with every type of ammo, because before initial firing we slathered machine gunners lube or another dedicated high temperature gun oil on the bolt carrier and recoil spring.

 

Member "Unobtanium" on this board has been through 3, maybe 4 M4's by now, and each has been 100% out of the box as well because he knew to properly lube.

 

As such, every thread I see that related to this topic I've somewhat concluded boils down to these two things, plentiful lube and 200+ round count to make sure an overly tight tolerance isn't causing friction based stoppages (unless something is catastrophically wrong, which I have yet to see).

 

So I ask, how many rounds are through your gun? And is the interior recoil spring, bottom of the bolt carrier and receiver rails slathered up with oil AT THE TIME OF THE SHOOT? Cleaning and oiling with CLP a week prior to shooting often leads to a near completely dry gun at the time of the shoot ... as many multi purpose or cheaper oils evaporate at room temperatures or as soon as they start to heat up. Oil right before your shoot, proper lubrication is 100000x more important than cleaning when it comes to this gun (and most other guns, for the matter).

 

If you have 200+ rounds through your gun, and you're lubed up, you should be able to burn through any brand of standard birdshot rounds without any issues. If not, detail the issue here and see if we can diagnose it.

Edited by Duggan
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All birdshot should fire fine.

 

Question 1) - How many rounds are through your gun? 200+?

Question 2) - Is your bolt carrier drenched in lube? Like literally, drenched.

 

I've come to believe that failure to reliably cycle birdshot comes from one of these two factors, each and every time it comes up on these forums.

 

My first M4 wouldn't cycle anything reliably for the first ~150 rounds. Buckshot, slugs, birdshot ... it would fire 3-4 rounds and have various jams on the next. It didn't have a drop of lube on it, as I was a newb and I didn't figure it would matter.

 

12000 rounds later now and I've yet to have a single malfunction after I lubed up the bolt carrier. I've cleaned it probably 4 times in all those rounds.

 

Between 3 friends and myself, after my initial "dry" m4 fail prone firing, we have purchased and broken in 4 M4's between us. Each of them has been 100% flawless out of the box with every type of ammo, because before initial firing we slathered machine gunners lube or another dedicated high temperature gun oil on the bolt carrier and recoil spring.

 

Member "Unobtanium" on this board has been through 3, maybe 4 M4's by now, and each has been 100% out of the box as well because he knew to properly lube.

 

As such, every thread I see that related to this topic I've somewhat concluded boils down to these two things, plentiful lube and 200+ round count to make sure an overly tight tolerance isn't causing friction based stoppages (unless something is catastrophically wrong, which I have yet to see).

 

So I ask, how many rounds are through your gun? And is the interior recoil spring, bottom of the bolt carrier and receiver rails slathered up with oil AT THE TIME OF THE SHOOT? Cleaning and oiling with CLP a week prior to shooting often leads to a near completely dry gun at the time of the shoot ... as many multi purpose or cheaper oils evaporate at room temperatures or as soon as they start to heat up. Oil right before your shoot, proper lubrication is 100000x more important than cleaning when it comes to this gun (and most other guns, for the matter).

 

If you have 200+ rounds through your gun, and you're lubed up, you should be able to burn through any brand of standard birdshot rounds without any issues. If not, detail the issue here and see if we can diagnose it.

What brand do you recomend for breaking in? do you use the same oil after broke in?

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Machinegunners lube from LaRue. It's cheap and it works great. It stays where you put it. The failure you are seeing is anemic ammunition. The bolt carrier barely opens fully before closing. If the bolt carrier doesn't open fully, it doesn't hit the ejector that is on the barrel assembly. A weak hit on the ejector leads to this type of failure where the bolt closes on a spent shell before it is fully ejected.

 

Your bolt carrier link and rails should be slathered with oil. If the weapon is fairly new, it should be broken in with some high dram shells.

 

Cool videos!

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Here is some info on dram equivilents:

http://answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20080416132939AACjmUi

 

Generally, it is the power factor. Higher brass usually indicates it is a heavier (more powerful) load. The more solid you hold the M4, the faster it will cycle. If you hold it at your hip and allow the weapon to travel backwards during recoil, it will perform sluggishly or fail.

 

Also, make sure you lube inside the receiver extension. You want to reduce friction inside this part by all means possible. The inner surface is rather rough.

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Don't waste money breaking it in with buckshot or slugs just use some heavy field loads. I myself started both my M2 and M4 out using Federal Heavy Field loads and to date have three FTF's.

If you can find a WalMart that still has some it's only $6-7 a 25rd box which is much more economical than buckshot & slugs.

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Thanks for the info guys, this helps a lot. It explains why the #7.5 shot was working better than the #8, the #7.5 was 3.25 drams and the #8 was 2.75. Unfortunately not all bird shot ammo boxes mention the dram numbers. I've got about 2-300 rounds through it so far, but I'm going to man up and take everything apart to lube it up. I'm used to ARs, so taking this apart is going to be a new experience, something that I was putting off. :)

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Thanks for the info guys, this helps a lot. It explains why the #7.5 shot was working better than the #8, the #7.5 was 3.25 drams and the #8 was 2.75. Unfortunately not all bird shot ammo boxes mention the dram numbers. I've got about 2-300 rounds through it so far, but I'm going to man up and take everything apart to lube it up. I'm used to ARs, so taking this apart is going to be a new experience, something that I was putting off. :)

 

This thing is easy to take apart and put back together like in 60 seconds;)

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i find any of the stuff you get at walmart in the value packs works just fine... the winchester or federal

 

in fact in like 500+ rounds i think i've only had 2 occurances with it not cycling.

 

agreed- i shot off a bunch yesterday - but got bored on the trap field making confetti of the torso target taped onto the metal patterning board (you cant use the rifle range itself if anyone else is there at our club :mad:)

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Thanks for the info guys, this helps a lot. It explains why the #7.5 shot was working better than the #8, the #7.5 was 3.25 drams and the #8 was 2.75. Unfortunately not all bird shot ammo boxes mention the dram numbers. I've got about 2-300 rounds through it so far, but I'm going to man up and take everything apart to lube it up. I'm used to ARs, so taking this apart is going to be a new experience, something that I was putting off. :)

 

not too difficult- i'm getting faster at it. the tricky part is that pin holding the trigger assembly. they told me on here that newer ones are tight until they are undone a few times- dont slip & scratch your gun trying to push it in!

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  • 2 weeks later...

You guys were right about the lube. I took it apart and put a ton of remington oil on the whole bolt and buffer spring assemblies before going to the range and it cycled 150+ rounds of 2.75 dram #8 shot without a single short stroke. It was definitely dry when I opened it up.

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I slightly disagree with the break-in of any gun. My M4 was purchased new. I fired 2.75" ESTATE target loads during my first 50 rounds or so, and out of 15 or so rounds, at least 6 or 7 of them failed to cycle. after I fired about 250 rounds through it(of a total hodge-podge of ammo!) I then fired an entire box of the Estate(same ammo, lot# and everything) with nary a hiccup!

 

Break-in, yes, but not with expensive ammo. I used heavy target and turkey loads.

 

Best cycling. . . may vary, but seems like my M4 will devour just about everything.

 

If there is a load that doesn't work well, I would buy it as a training tool and/or buy dummy rounds so you can practice malfunction reactions.

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