Jump to content
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...
Benelli Forums
OhioM4

Airsoft Gun for Grandson...What is your opionion?

Recommended Posts

I went shopping at the local sporting goods store with my grandson today. I picked up a box of ammo for my pistol and we stopped to look at BB guns and the new (to me at least) Airsoft guns. My step-daughter and her husband are not really antigun but with four kids in the house they do not currently own any guns. They all know I shoot at the target ranges. I never have been hunting and it does not really appeal to me although i have numerous friends that are avid hunters.

 

My grandson wants a BB gun or Airsoft gun for Christmas. I spoke to his parents about them. He is 10 and in Scouts so I think he should learn about gun safety. My father insisted I go to a hunter safety course when I was 13 even though he did not own a gun. His upbringing placed a value on knowing enough to be safe around guns.

 

The airsoft guns appear to be functionally safer than the BB guns I had at his age. The ammo is plastic and much larger than the old copper clad BBs. They come in different weights as well. The lightweight ammo in the less powerful guns would appear to be much safer than standard BBs although eye protection would still be mandatory. The guns appear to have been engineered to be safe to fire at human targets. My grandson stated that several of his friends own these Airsoft guns and he has been shot with them while playing.

 

This brings me to the part I found unsettling; one of the guns we looked at was virtually an exact replica of my Sig Sauer P226. It was expensive, $189, but the weight and appearance are virtually identical. The action is identical; functional decocker, SA/DA, and the slide blows back and cycles. I realized almost all of the major gun brands have licensed their designs for Airsoft versions. They also have extremely realistic shotguns and assault rifles. The only difference is a relatively small fluorescent orange ring at the muzzle.

 

It bothered me that children are using guns that are identical to real handguns. In my day you could tell the difference between the cheesy BB guns and a real gun. There were high-end pellet rifles that could be confused for hunting rifles so maybe I'm being alarmist. I keep my guns secured but I could picture my grandson finding "Papa's Airsoft Pistol" and not realizing it is a very different piece of equipment.

 

On the plus side I can see myself purchasing an Airsoft gun to practice for a CCW permit. Most of the ranges around here forbid practicing drawing from a holster.

Edited by OhioM4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

IMO... I would lean more towards a good entry level, spring piston, break-barrel .177 cal pellet rifle.

As they are single shot, the shooter learns the patience and skill to make every shot count.

 

Also, they are "real" guns. Potentially as lethal as a centerfire gun.

The youngster is taught that this is not a toy, not a plaything... and only to be used, or even handled, with adult supervision.

A side benefit is the adult can enjoy shooting an accurate mid-powered air rifle as much as a child... if not more so. ;)

 

Again, IMO... to teach a child care, common sense and respect for real weapons, they have to learn with real weapons. Toys like Airsoft guns might only serve to confuse them into thinking that everything is an Airsoft.

 

I'm in my 50s, but own and take great pleasure in shooting my air rifles... almost every week I take a few shots in the lower meadow of my property.

 

Cheers,

C

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think airsoft is a bad idea if your training a new/young shooter to shoot a real gun. He said he has been shot with one so he won't get the idea. As posted above, I would go with the single action, break open pellet guns. They make them in rifle and pistol.

 

I think its great your taking the time to do this with your grandson. I came from a gun free home and didn't start shooting til I was 18. Didn't get my first gun til I was 21.

 

Thanks for sharing the sport.

 

Novaking

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Kid's around consider airsoft gun just toys, especially teenagers. They love to shoot at each other, even though the plastic BB, can do some damage. The required orange tips make them even look like toys.

 

I agree with the others. Give a "real gun" and have all use supervised, until the child can prove proper age-appropriate usage and handling.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If the parents are good with it, that is a darn lucky kid. I too came from a gun free home. Although, my father bought me my first single shot pellet .177 when I was 15, I bacically ended up learning to shoot it myself. When I turned 18, I went hunting for the first time alone with my grandfather's 410 single shot. Then I ended up borrowing the town's preist 20 GA single shot, and used it for years until I got my first job and started buying guns then. I never looked back.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I guess I was lucky. I got handed my first single shot .22 Marlin at the ripe age of 10.

 

My dad taught me how to shoot it (no easy task, as I am left handed) as well as all of the rules of gun safety that he learned in the Army.

 

I still have the firearm, and must have fired 10,000 rounds through it.

 

The things he taught me served me well throughout my 20+ year military career, and serves as some of the fondest memories that I have with him.

 

I agree whole-heartedly with the concept of the single shot, non-toy looking projectile launcher...but only with a lot of adult supervision at the onset.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for all the feedback guys. I guess I see it as yet another indication of the decay of western society. It really is unsettling to think of kids running around being encouraged to shoot each other with nearly exact replicas of real guns. What surprised me is it is the "gun shy" parents (no guns in the household) that think this is OK. I would hope that any household that has real guns would ensure that children are taught safe handling of firearms. You have to add a whole new chapter on toy identification and toy safety now. I agree that totally supervised training with a real gun may do more to engender a respect for safety than just handing a kid a dangerous toy.

 

When I was about 8 years old I found a revolver hidden in a baseball dugout at the elementary school playground. It may have been a starter's pistol or it may have been a real gun. The point is, my dad took the time to teach me gun safety and to his credit I did not touch it, I reported it to the principal and he called to police (He apparently thought it was a big deal). I hope my grandson would be able to exercise the same good judgment.

Edited by OhioM4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Airsoft guns for a 10 year old are great.

 

I do agree they could look a little more like toys, versus the tactical look! But the parent/adult that buys them seem to be the marketforce for the manufacturer and the seller.

 

Giving a 10 year old a pellet gun, or a real gun, FIRST and you are asking for trouble. Kids will be kids; and it is usually the good kids' friends who mess with the wrong gun.

 

Unless you have 24/7 supervision of the kid and their friends they hang with, why on earth would you give em' a real gun first?

 

If the kid can't safely handle an Airsoft, then they sure don't need anything more lethal.

 

I have instructed at least 5 kids using airsoft pistols. I trained them as if the gun "were" real. I also trained them to shoot at a target in a pond (I know shooting a real gun in water is a NO-NO...and I told the kids this, but airsoft water shooting really tells the kids a lot about their aim.)

 

Get an airsoft , when they grow out of it , then move up to a pellet/BB.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I guess I see it as yet another indication of the decay of western society. It really is unsettling to think of kids running around being encouraged to shoot each other with nearly exact replicas of real guns.

 

You have to add a whole new chapter on toy identification and toy safety now. I agree that totally supervised training with a real gun may do more to engender a respect for safety than just handing a kid a dangerous toy.

 

No disrespect Ohio but calling the downfall of western civilization because people like to play with realistic looking guns seems a bit drastic.

 

These air soft guns are used by kids and adults alike who like to "wargame". And I'm pretty sure it is the adults who like those sports that drive the realism aspect. As you pointed out because they are very realistic they can be used in some training situations. I'm sure most of us have had an experience teaching a new person where the thought "I knew I should have worn my bulletproof vest today" flashed across our minds.

 

Yes you do have to add a more rigorous explanation of real vs toy gun identification. But I'm sure your grandson isn't stupid, and will catch on quickly. I think if you are straightforward with him then you won't have too many issues.

 

That said I agree with the other posters that you, being one of the few conduits to real gun knowledge in the family, should present him with a real gun. Knowing how to handle a real gun prepares you for air soft, knowing how to handle air soft does not prepare you for a real gun.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have owned many airsoft guns and they can put an eye out and kids that haven't been taught gun safety will shoot each other when they think the parents don't know. They are lots of fun but don't teach proper gun safety. I wouldn't encourage a spring piston air rifle because they are very difficult to cock and are very big and heavy for smaller shooters. What I would recommend is a single shot 22 long rifle with rifle sights and small dimensions. You can find them easily. You can load 22 shorts in them which are tiny and quiet and will kill birds and tree rats and rabbits and most small game. You can load long rifles in them which are very cheap but louder and more dangerous but still relatively quiet and safe after a short distance in the woods. It will teach him to make that 1 shot count. A small 410 shotgun would be a good option because it is not very dangerous after 50 yards with bird shot and is easy to kill squirrels and birds with.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Airsoft guns for a 10 year old are great.

 

 

Unless you have 24/7 supervision of the kid and their friends they hang with, why on earth would you give em' a real gun first?

 

I'm OK with doing so. Kids learning to shoot guns should have supervision 24/7 when there handling firearms. I don't understand why you or anyone would disagree. Toy gun are toys and real guns are real. Kids don't understand that until you tell and teach them.

 

I understand you know this. Kids will be kids and they will shoot each other with that airsoft when your not looking. Training will an airsoft is great. But then it becomes a real gun.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I don't understand why you or anyone would disagree. Toy gun are toys and real guns are real. Kids don't understand that until you tell and teach them.
So-so much depends on the child, so-so much depends on the parents, so-so much then depends on the other kids the child hangs with... {most of the time about 50%-80% is the influence from their little friends}.

If you really could tell what a kid was thinking all the time, or even get a grasp on what they truly understand, from what you think you just taught them........ you should be a teacher or a psychic {kid whisperer?}

 

 

I have taught firearms to both Boy Scouts, Girl Scouts , and even a few Marine recruits.;)

 

Kids do all kinds of things that can be pretty strange with a weapon---- toy or otherwise.

There is a lot to learn and failure can be a high price.

 

Well-- I will firmly stick to my assertion that a progression of training starting with an Airsoft, then a BB/pellet , then a real gun will work very well to train a child as they grow into guns. It works, and the degree of foul ups are slowly learned on the way to more lethal weapons.

Kids seem to really respond to the slow trajectory that they can actually SEE from the brightly colored plastic projectiles.

 

It is a strange world for a Kid today , kids can do some odd stuff >>> like this for example :eek:

 

{{PS. we spray-painted the Airsoft pistols with some sky blue paint. Not just because it shows it to be more like a toy, BUT cause the kids kept loosing the black ones in the tall weeds. Blue paint helps in finding them!

Kids will be kids.}}

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
So-so much depends on the child, so-so much depends on the parents, so-so much then depends on the other kids the child hangs with... {most of the time about 50%-80% is the influence from their little friends}.

If you really could tell what a kid was thinking all the time, or even get a grasp on what they truly understand, from what you think you just taught them........ you should be a teacher or a psychic {kid whisperer?}

 

 

I have taught firearms to both Boy Scouts, Girl Scouts , and even a few Marine recruits.

 

Kids do all kinds of things that can be pretty strange with a weapon---- toy or otherwise.

There is a lot to learn and failure can be a high price.

 

Well-- I will firmly stick to my assertion that a progression of training starting with an Airsoft, then a BB/pellet , then a real gun will work very well to train a child as they grow into guns. It works, and the degree of foul ups are slowly learned on the way to more lethal weapons.

Kids seem to really respond to the slow trajectory that they can actually SEE from the brightly colored plastic projectiles.

 

It is a strange world for a Kid today , kids can do some odd stuff >>> like this for example :eek:

 

{{PS. we spray-painted the Airsoft pistols with some sky blue paint. Not just because it shows it to be more like a toy, BUT cause the kids kept loosing the black ones in the tall weeds. Blue paint helps in finding them!

Kids will be kids.}}

 

 

Nice link!:p

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you want to start with an airsoft gun or bb gun tell them they have to show responsibility and proper safety before you will let them handle a real gun, and watch them when they don't know your looking and see if you see them using it in a way that would be unsafe with a real gun. Just a thought.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
×
  • Create New...