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awmp

shotgun for clays

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Or you could buy a Vinci if you can handle all the old guys at the club taking digs at you for shooting something that doesn't look like their daddies' shotgun. ;)

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What game are you shooting? trap, skeet, 5 stand, sporting clays.....some guys will get real specific when it comes to picking a gun for a peticular shooting game.

 

The 3 gas operated auto loaders mentioned about will certainly do the trick.

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Easy

 

Beretta 391 or Remington 1100/1187

alot of people really do like the 1100 and beretta 391 they are great crossover guns for birds and clays, Ive tried em both and the 391 didnt fit me right and the 1100 had allitle more recoil and muzzle jump not enough to effect anything though. the vinci seems to be the winner in my book that or the 1100, I did notice one of my friends use to shot an old trap 1100 and was amazing in trap for his division and he got a g3 1100 i think its called and now he doesent shoot good at all just a suggestion for the 1100s. good luck with the decision

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I don't know much about the Vinci. I've only seen one, and only for a few minutes.

 

Its "newfangled."

 

The thing the 1100 and 391 have that the Vinci doesn't have (or shall I say, doesn't have yet) is proof of longevity.

 

There are 40 year old 1100's still firing away.

 

The Vinci was introduced last year.

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I don't know much about the Vinci. I've only seen one, and only for a few minutes.

 

Its "newfangled."

 

The thing the 1100 and 391 have that the Vinci doesn't have (or shall I say, doesn't have yet) is proof of longevity.

 

There are 40 year old 1100's still firing away.

 

The Vinci was introduced last year.

i agree but the testing they put through each vinci with zero malfunctions is pretty promising in my opinion ive never had a single problem with mine exept learning how to put it together now it takes 10 seconds:D

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I am currently transitioning from a Rem. 1100 that i've had since I was a boy, to a Benelli Supersport, to shoot skeet with. I done this because when I get a chance to shoot I may shoot 200 shells, and sometimes I would have to stop and clean the gun. With the Benelli I have shot over 200 shells without cleaning. Don't get me wrong, the Rem. 1100 is a great gun with some advantages, like you can find parts for it anywhere. I have had problems already finding accesories for the Benelli. But maybe that will change as they get more popular.

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SuperSport!! The barrel is ported just like very expensive trap/skeet guns. I use my 20 ga almost exclusively as my pheasant hunting gun. A disadvantage of all of the hunting semi-autos is the weight and/or barrel length. Skeet guns tend to be heavy in the 10 - 12 lb range because the weight helps with follow-through which is essential for high scoring skeet shooting. Most serious skeet shooters use a 12 ga OU with a set of barrel inserts for 20 and 28 ga., and .410 so that they can shoot in all bore classifications. This system also has the advantage of shooting basically the same gun for all gauges. For trap, the biggest difference is the barrel length. Trap guns have barrels in the 32" range to help with sighting the target. Using a Benelli auto in either sport has the disadvantage of the lack of a specifically made shell catcher for Benelli shotguns. On the trap or skeet range, tossing hulls all over the place is frowned upon. Most autos have shell catchers that attach to the ejection port to keep the shell from flying into the shooter beside you in trap. I am not aware of a manufacturer that makes a shell catcher for the Benelli. I use a rubber band wrapped around the ejection port as a shell catcher when I shoot trap/skeet with my autos, not elegant but it works.

Edited by BlackDogs3

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Supersports are popular at my club. Vincis seem to be slow gaining acceptance due to looks. Of course the laughing stops when the shooter hits all 25. Either will do that. My son shoots a youth Monty and is very happy with it and there are several full size Montys at the club.

 

At the end of the day, fit is the most important in any sporting gun. Get someone knowledgeable to measure you for LoP and Drop then find something that feels comfortable when you mount the gun. If you get a gun that fits, you can easily shoot most any discipline.

 

As far as operation, I like the inertia type over the gas for simplicity of operation and thus reliability. Also cleaning tends to be less intensive than that of the gas guns - I have both and know first hand.

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Hey there

 

Add another vote for the SuperSport. The 30" barrel is a good choice if you want to include trap in your game. If not then the 28" should work well for the rest.

 

It works well for me on skeet and sporting clays. Trap is a little tougher as I have yet to find the groove.

 

My other gun is an older Browning Citori Skeet with 28" barrels. As much as I love it, the SS has taken its place on everything but trap.

 

Good luck to you in the searching.

 

Allan

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Maybe the Super Sport and the Vinci are the wave of things to come. I don't know.

 

Here's what is really, really important, and you can take this to the bank. Whatever you choose, find a gun that fits you well, feels good in your hands, and shoots where you are pointing. Gun fit is the key.

 

Most of the reputable brand-name guns will take care of you if you take care of them.

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Hi, I read your question and would like to respond.

 

I use a heavy O/U for skeet. My choice is based in the good info that BlackDogs3 mentions (better follow through on crossing targets, and the capability to fit barrel tubes allowing a single gun for all gauges using the same gun). Another significant advantage a two barrel gun provides when shooting skeet is better reliability. It’s a big disappointment if your autoloader misfeeds when executing a high/low house dual shot.

 

When shooting trap, I prefer an autoloader that is around 8 pounds and has a long barrel with a vented rib.. I don’t seem to feel the gun’s weight when shooting skeet (even when shooting a lot of targets), but to me a 10 pound gun feels very heavy after shooting even just 75 targets in trap. When shooting a lighter gun in trap, the autoloader provides the advantage of less perceived recoil, and the overall result is less fatigue from the reduced weight and the reduced recoil that you get shooting an autoloader.

 

With this said and as BlackDogs3 points out, you do have the obligation of not disturbing the shooter who is on the next station. It can be very distracting if the shooter on your left continually throws shells towards you. There is a rhythm you notice on a well-behaved trap-line, and you do not want to disrupt this. One shooter that messes up the timing can adversely affect the entire squad.

 

A shell catcher eliminates the problem, but some shooters don’t want the additional hardware on their gun. My Montefeltro throws the shell out laterally and slightly rearward, so mercifully I’ve never had other shooters in the squad complain. I cannot say for sure if other Benelli autoloaders do this.

 

--Spike

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remington 1187

 

Questions…

 

1. Which model of the Remington 11-87 do you prefer for clay targets?

 

2. What configurations (barrel length, choke, rib, etc.) do you recommend for trap, skeet, sporting clays?

 

--Spike

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What makes this choice easy over other guns?

 

Price ....... handling ....... cleaning ......... handles different loads better ??

 

Just trying to get a handle on what to look for.

 

Easy

 

Beretta 391 or Remington 1100/1187

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What makes this choice easy over other guns?

 

Price ....... handling ....... cleaning ......... handles different loads better ??

 

Just trying to get a handle on what to look for.

 

I made that statement on the basis of shooting strictly clay target sports, since the original question was a semi-auto shotgun for clays.

 

The Beretta and Remington guns I quoted have a long history of being excellent semi-auto guns to use for these sports.

 

Both offer recoil reduction and reliability.

 

Reliability-wise, the Beretta probably tops the Remington, however, the Remington gets the "ease of repair, and parts availability" advantage. Its like a Ford Taurus. There's literally millions of them, and just about any gunsmith can fix them, and they're so simple, you can fix most problems yourself in minutes.

 

Cleaning? They're both a pain in the neck to clean, and they both need cleaning often. About every 400 shots or so.

 

Handling different loads? Generally speaking, both will handle the normal range of target loads, if you get a target model. And if it is a gun for clays, you won't be shooting goose loads through them anyway.

 

They're both heavy, and both offer gas operation which reduces recoil. When you shoot targets, you shoot light loads, but you shoot a lot of them. Recoil is cumulative. Weight helps recoil, and it helps smooth out your move to the target, which is a good thing when you are shooting clays.

 

Bottom line, they are both "tried and true" clay target guns.

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Questions…

 

1. Which model of the Remington 11-87 do you prefer for clay targets?

 

2. What configurations (barrel length, choke, rib, etc.) do you recommend for trap, skeet, sporting clays?

 

--Spike

 

I started shooting trap with an 1100, which is virtually the same as an 1187. Just my opinion, but:

 

Trap - Trap model with 30" fixed full choke step-rib barrel and Monte Carlo stock.

 

Skeet - Skeet model with 26" fixed skeet choke flat-rib barrel.

 

Sporting Clays - I don't normally shoot sport with one of these guns, but Remington has several sporting clays models. All things considered, a 28" field model with choke tubes would be a good choice as a starter gun for sporting clays.

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Well i have the m2000 and i use it for everything like hunting and clay i am i the high school trap team here in Nebraska and at the state meet i got a 98 out of 100 i handicaps so i think i am going to keep this gun but during the other meet i had the ejector bolt and screw came out and i am haveing trouble finding parts :mad:

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I started shooting trap with an 1100, which is virtually the same as an 1187. Just my opinion, but:

 

Trap - Trap model with 30" fixed full choke step-rib barrel and Monte Carlo stock.

 

Skeet - Skeet model with 26" fixed skeet choke flat-rib barrel.

 

Sporting Clays - I don't normally shoot sport with one of these guns, but Remington has several sporting clays models. All things considered, a 28" field model with choke tubes would be a good choice as a starter gun for sporting clays.

 

Thanks for your thorough and accurate reply. You provide some great information.

 

I did hope for comments from Kyle58962, but he is not responding.

 

--Spike

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stoegerhunter,

 

What I say, is its the Indian, not the arrow. Great shooting! I wouldn't change a thing. Hope you can get it fixed.

 

Keep it up!

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Well i have the m2000 and i use it for everything like hunting and clay i am i the high school trap team here in Nebraska and at the state meet i got a 98 out of 100 i handicaps so i think i am going to keep this gun but during the other meet i had the ejector bolt and screw came out and i am haveing trouble finding parts :mad:

 

That is very good shooting, especially at your age.

 

I've been shooting trap for years and happy with a 24. My personal best on 100 targets is 97 (not as good as your score).

 

Professional and high-end trap shooters will break 200 or even more targets without a miss, but they shoot an enormous number of targets to reach this level.

 

--Spike

Edited by Spike100

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