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Recoil Link scratches


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Hello, I'm a new M4 owner and I've been to the range twice and shot a few slugs, buckshot rounds and target and low-recoil home defense rounds.  The target rounds and low-recoil rounds didn't cycle reliably, so I'm planning to continue with the higher power stuff for now.   

 

While cleaning the bolt assembly, I noticed scratches on both sides of the link where the link moves in the bolt assembly and noticed the link has a little side to side play which causes rubbing on the sides of the bolt assembly.  Just wanted to check if this is typical/expected wear after a couple of light shooting sessions? 

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Yup, completely normal. Just apply some lube to it when cleaning then you'll be fine.


As for the low recoil stuff, you need to break the gun in with full power loads first. The M4 is designed to eat all kinds of rounds except for the stubby shells, so just put about 75-100 high brass loads through it then you'll be all set for the low power 2 3/4 shells.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Not to disagree with Clack's recommendation. But, for what it's worth, back in the day I was always told to use high brass shells 1 1/8th oz load with my original HK SBE. I found the brass height itself not to make any difference. However, I had to shoot 1oz loads or heavier. With 7/8oz loads, it would fire, eject, then close on an empty chamber because the bolt wasn't pushed back far enough to trigger the mag release. Since I shoot 3.5" during waterfowling, I never went to reduced power spring that would have remedied those light weight shells.

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@bambihunter I've read that high and low brass isn't necessarily indicative of velocity these days? Maybe with such a high variety of ammo I think it's more accurate to just read the stats on the box. Hopefully y'all can clear this up for me because I'm not really sure.

Otherwise, I just lube all the moving points on the bolt on my M4. Shot some trap yesterday and 3 dram 1200 fps #8 winchester heavy target loads locked open on each shot after 400-500 rounds of running 2-3/4" & 3" buck and slugs.

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Not sure. Perhaps decades ago only the high brass shells were loaded hot and that's where that started. I don't know. I just know on cheapo skeet loads, it went purely by weight for my SBE. All of my other Benelli's that are inertia shoot 7/8oz fine. I don't skeet shoot with my M4 as it is not built for that, or would it be easy to use for it.

Also, as far as lubing I personally use it sparingly and use only dry lube in the magazine and if it is going to be cold and/or dusty, I use it for everything. Nothing like getting up early, driving 45 minutes to get to my hunting spot. Break ice all the way out, set out decoys, birds finally in the air, and the oil has gelled up so I have an expensive single shot... True story and more than once...

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5 hours ago, bambihunter said:

Not to disagree with Clack's recommendation. But, for what it's worth, back in the day I was always told to use high brass shells 1 1/8th oz load with my original HK SBE. I found the brass height itself not to make any difference.

Yup, I don't disagree. In this case though I was using high brass as a catch-all term for powerful shells.

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3 hours ago, bambihunter said:

Also, as far as lubing I personally use it sparingly and use only dry lube in the magazine and if it is going to be cold and/or dusty, I use it for everything. Nothing like getting up early, driving 45 minutes to get to my hunting spot. Break ice all the way out, set out decoys, birds finally in the air, and the oil has gelled up so I have an expensive single shot... True story and more than once...

Yup, agreed. Do you have a dry lube preference?

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I've tried quite a few over the years Clack. What I started with, I have went full circle and I am back using. It is a spray on. I am fairly sure it is moly based. It is used by machinist for their machines. My brother-in-law used to swear by the stuff so he bought me a case of it. I'll have to dig it out.. I have also used the Otis spray in a pinch and I'd say it rates right up there.

I don't like any of them that resort to a loose powder after use. Some of the graphite based ones do this.

 

I will use wet lube to break in new guns or ones that I'll be shooting a lot in a short period of time then cleaning. After that, or ones like CCW or hunting guns that often don't get cleaned immediately or will likely sit where dust can ingress, I only use dry. For shotgun magazines - 100% ONLY dry lube. As I eluded to before, I have bought many guns from fellow waterfowlers that hated that SOB gun because it was a jam-o-matic. I've had several buy it back after they see how well it shoots with proper maintenance. The money I have made on just buying and selling Benelli's alone that just needed cleaned and lubed right has afforded me more Benelli's. 🙂

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