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Benelli M4 Break In question


AR-BALLISTIC
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Once you've cleaned, lubed and assembled it... get your hands on lots of ammo and shoot it until your shoulder can't take it anymore :)

 

I've been using Federal Tactical LE reduced-recoil slugs at the indoor range, and the same in #00 buck outdoors. I have also used Remington standard-load 1oz. Sluggers, as well as standard-load #00 buck.

 

After using the shotgun, I have been running a bore-snake through it a couple of times, swabbing the breach clean with CLP, and wiping the remainder of the weapon down. I also inspect the bolt carrier/face of the bolt after every session. About every other session, I take the weapon down completely, clean, inspect and lubricate it. That's about it...

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  • 4 years later...

I fired my new M4 for the first time today. 75 shells of the 2 3/4" Federal LE full power buckshot variety. The lady from Benelli's tech support line said to use full power loads to break in the new springs. I took 125 shells with me but got rained out b4 I could shoot 'em all. To be honest, my shoulder was hurting after 10 shells. :o

ARGO, shmargo, my M4 kicks like a Minnesota mule !!

That being said, inside of about 50 yards it's my go to gun now. 50 to 200 yards LE 6920, beyond that it's M1A time.

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When breaking mine in a few months ago, I bought a total variety pack of 2-3/4" and 3" shells, most of them being turkey loads, some buckshot, maybe ten slugs and I did put some target loads in there as well.

 

First day out I put 115 rounds downrange. The *ONLY* ones that would fail to eject/cycle were ESTATE, but I expected that as they are lower power round. Everything else 100% function.

 

I took it home, cleaned it, and went back out soon, fired another 100 rounds of varying shells down the launch tube. this time the Estates did cycle through. Everything I've fired through it has cycled since EXCEPT less-lethal rounds I got from work. But I totally expected that, as those hardly have any powder to them. Heck, the bag drops about 2-3ft @ 25 yard!! :eek:

 

I've managed to put about 1k rounds through my M4 in a few months, and have had ZERO malfunctions other than the initial break-in I mentioned above. The only malfunctions I get are the ones I make happen (dummy rounds) for weapon handling drills. But as far as live fire goes, this has been better than a 1911 .45 (wincing and waiting for the lashes from .45 die-hards) :p

 

Best of luck, congrats on your purchase!! load it, shoot it, feed it more.

 

Happy 4th of July, you'll have your own 12ga fireworks to celebrate!

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God I hate it when I don't see the date of the original post! Grrrr! :(

 

An old thread, but an important topic to those with a new M4 in their hands. Break-in is simple but important. A problem with light birdshot when new could, inadvertently, be deemed by some to be indicative of problems with the shotgun rather than just the need to get some "cycles" on it. Your new comments as well as the others are of value.

 

Edit: Another point worth pondering is keeping it very well lubed during the break-in. I kept mine VERY wet initially and had zero issues.

Edited by BigHat
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What exactly do some of you believe you are breaking in by running hundreds of rounds through a M4 or M2? Any blemishes in/on mating surfaces dissappear after less than 20 rounds. Sure the springs set a little but thats about it and in most cases what won't cycle by round 10 never will. After owning several M2's and my M4 I've never done more than clean them up put them together and shoot em a few times. I can count FTF's on one hand between six guns and all but one were operator error.

I'm sure certain members will think I am trying to stir the pot but I just don't see running that many rounds through a new gun anything other than wear.

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What exactly do some of you believe you are breaking in by running hundreds of rounds through a M4 or M2? . . .

 

I've never done more than clean them up put them together and shoot em a few times. I can count FTF's on one hand between six guns and all but one were operator error.

 

 

Cody, I understand your point of view, but. . . would you take a new sportbike and just "run it like ya brung it" to a race or a trackday? I doubt it. Would you run a marathon in a pair of never before worn running shoes? Not likely.

 

Mechanically speaking. . . probably not needed. In the academy, I had 40hrs of firearms training and we ran about 2k rounds through our Glocks. I think it serves two purpose. One - the obvious, F.A. training and motorskill development. TWO - "break-in" the firearms AND. . allow the operators to develop confidence with their handgun.

 

Soooo, that being said, I think most people(myself included) want to feel confident that their $1500 gun will run, and run flawlessly. I think that's a reasonable expectation for someone spending $1500 on a shotgun. Secondly, people just want to know what runs in their gun and doesn't. People want to know what cheap ammo they can use for a 3-gun competition to knock down plates and poppers, or what will work for reload/handling drills.

 

One of my other favorite shooting games is .22LR ammo tryouts in my CZ452 military trainer. I've found ammo that stays at or under an inch @ 50 yds. Other ammo that won't dial in under three inches. Same with shotty and buckshot tryouts that I hope most to all of people in this forum do. Buckshot "a" patterns at 6" spread at 30ft vs buckshot "b" patterns at 3", etc.

 

It's a mechanical device that is assembly line manufactured. IF we knew every M4 was hand assembled with the care of one person, break-in might not be such a big deal, all those burrs, rough edges, etc would be taken care of(NOT like there's many of those anyway, I know.) ;)

 

I break in ANY gun I buy. Pistols, rifles, shotguns. But. . . that's just me. I enjoy every aspect of my firearms from purchase to cleaning.

 

Anyway, just my $.02. . .. again, on an old post :rolleyes: hehehe

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was going to ask what exactly the "break in" is supposed to do for the gun other than making sure the gun isn't defective. Is this something specific to a shotgun?

 

I've never really heard of breaking in a gun with respect to my pistols or rifles. Not trying to be a smartass

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was going to ask what exactly the "break in" is supposed to do for the gun other than making sure the gun isn't defective. Is this something specific to a shotgun?

 

I've never really heard of breaking in a gun with respect to my pistols or rifles. Not trying to be a smartass

 

Metal parts will have microscopic 'burrs'/rough edges on them from the machining process/manufacturing process. "Breaking in" allows these surfaces to wear in to their mating surfaces - you will see some of the anodizing removed from the receiver as part of the break in/wear process - just a process to mate the moving parts.

 

The second accomplishment is to hopefully uncover any defects that might be in the gun with either workmanship or material - spring that wants to break, etc.

 

3rd - as well stated by twowheelhooligan - is getting used to the operation of the gun, muscle memory, figuring out what works and doesn't work

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Metal parts will have microscopic 'burrs'/rough edges on them from the machining process/manufacturing process. "Breaking in" allows these surfaces to wear in to their mating surfaces - you will see some of the anodizing removed from the receiver as part of the break in/wear process - just a process to mate the moving parts.

 

 

Wilson Combat prescribes a "break-in process" for their pistols in the manual that comes with them. 500 rounds of ammo through it before the first disassembly and cleaning. This is to accomplish what's noted above.

 

Even without specific directions to do so, it's rare that an auto pistol I've purchased runs as well in the first few hundred rounds as it does after them and that's with Wilson, Ed Brown, SIG, and FN models. I certainly would never dream of carrying something concealed for example or even use a shotgun planned for self-defense in that role right out of the box.

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Back in the old days of 'ought five, when this thread was started, machining technology was not up to the same standards it is today. The barrels were scooped out with dull spoons and polished with tree branches and sand. The stocks were made out of old barn boards and the triggers was nothing but a bent nail. You had to sit for hours running the bolt back and forth with fine sand in the receiver to deburr the action. Like the old muskets you had to "proof" the barrel yourself with high power loads. If the barrel didn't explode you were good to go.

 

You all do realize you are supposed to prop the gun up agin a tree and tie a string to the trigger while you are hiding in a foxhole for the first 25 rounds...dontcha??

 

 

I want to hear more about less lethal rounds!

 

... Everything I've fired through it has cycled since EXCEPT less-lethal rounds I got from work. But I totally expected that, as those hardly have any powder to them. Heck, the bag drops about 2-3ft @ 25 yard!! :eek:...

 

Do you compensate for the excessive drop...or just go with the nut shot?

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Metal parts will have microscopic 'burrs'/rough edges on them from the machining process/manufacturing process. "Breaking in" allows these surfaces to wear in to their mating surfaces - you will see some of the anodizing removed from the receiver as part of the break in/wear process - just a process to mate the moving parts.

 

The second accomplishment is to hopefully uncover any defects that might be in the gun with either workmanship or material - spring that wants to break, etc.

 

3rd - as well stated by twowheelhooligan - is getting used to the operation of the gun, muscle memory, figuring out what works and doesn't work

 

Which is exaclty what I said before when people went ballistic. You don't need to take it out and run 500 rounds of maximum mag loads through it. When I "broke in" my M2's & M4 I used Federal Heavy Field loads not $1 a round buckshot or slugs.

Edited by cody6.0
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All hail queen cody6.0. She has spoken and imparted her infinite wisdom upon the land. woman.gif

Put me back on your ignore list and shut the **** up.

You aren't smoothing out tool marks on rifling it's as simple as setting a spring (two in inertia guns) and cleaning up the bolt rails.

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Put me back on your ignore list and shut the **** up.

You aren't smoothing out tool marks on rifling it's as simple as setting a spring (two in inertia guns) and cleaning up the bolt rails.

 

Must be that time of the month. mutley.gif

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