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Tony Scarboni

M1014 recoil tube removal

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With the upcoming release of the US made hammer, I decided it is time to change the recoil tube on my M1014. I have ordered the recoil tube and began disassembly in anticipation. I could not get the recoil tube locking nut to budge. I followed similar steps to remove the magazine and had no problems. Apply heat, twist off. There was very little thread locker on the magazine. I would really like to remove my recoil tube without damaging the receiver. Anybody have first hand experience removing the recoil tube on an early M1014? This would be the American flag version with a date of production stamp from 2002. Any help, advice, or tips will be appreciated.

Thank you

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There is a lot of misinformation concerning how to remove these recoil tubes from your weapon. Benelli will tell you that you will destroy the shotgun if you attempt to remove the extension. This is only true if you do not heat the threads sufficiently to break the thread locker.

 

Once you've developed the testicular fortitude to complete this project, you must do the following:

 

Disassemble the weapon. You must remove the internals from the recoil tube assembly. Use a pair of snap ring pliers to remove the snap ring at the bottom of the recoil tube. Unscrew the spring retainer. You should put a punch through one of the drainage holes to keep the spring from ejecting when you remove the plug. Contain the spring as the punch is removed. Tip the receiver back to allow the plunger to slide out of the recoil tube. After that, you should spray the recoil tube out with solvent to remove oil and debris that might catch fire during the next process.

 

To remove the tube, you must heat the recoil tube extension's locknut with a heatgun for 30 minutes or more. A propane torch would also work, and be faster. However, a heatgun will be slower and safer. Benelli coats the threads with a green thread locker compound. Make sure you put the receiver in a vice. I found the best place to clamp to was below the rear sight. You do not want to crush the receiver with the vice. Apply just enough tension to hold the receiver in place. Make sure you apply some padding between your receiver and the vice. The nut is common thread.

 

The nut is a 1 1/16" or metric equivalent wrench. You do not want to apply a lot of torque to the receiver. You want the heat to break the locktite's hold. I never used more than one arm to apply torque with. Once it is heated sufficiently, the nut will begin to turn slowly. Continue heating until the nut is completely removed and slides off the end of the recoil tube.

 

Now time for the hard part.

Continue to apply heat to the recoil tube threaded area. Use an open ended 3/4" box wrench on the flat spots of the recoil tube to apply torque. These are also common thread. This may take another 30 minutes with a heatgun to break the locktite compounds hold. Note the depth that the recoil tube is screwed into the receiver. Also be aware that this item must be timed to index the stock in an appropriate direction.

 

Once the recoil tube unscrews, clean up the threads with acetone or another solvent. A wirebrush will help.

 

To reassemble, screw the new recoil tube in so that the threads are flush with the inside of the receiver. Thread the locknut over the recoil tube assembly and screw it flush with the receiver. Add the collapsible stock to the tail to act as an index to help time the recoil tube assembly. Once you've indexed it to where you want it, tighten the locknut. What I recommend is installing the collapsible stock at this time, and collapsing it fully. Use the cheek weld piece of the collapsible stock as an index point. Point the cheek weld so it points to the middle of the rear iron sight housing. Once you have it where you want, tighten the locknut. I highly recommend reapplying locktite to the recoil tube and the locknut. Even if you simply use the blue type. The recoil tube extension is pretty easy to screw in. You can do it by hand.

 

Reinstall the internals of the recoil tube. Drop the plunger in, followed by the spring. Press the spring in and retain it with a punch or screwdriver. Screw in the spring plug. Reinstall the snap ring.

 

Install your stock.

 

Hopefully this tutorial is clear. The times needed to run the heatgun are accurate. Prop the weapon up so you can leave the heat on it and just sit by and watch.

Edited by StrangerDanger

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Success! Thank you StrangerDanger. Removal was easier than the directions implied. This was going to be the hardest most feared step in my plans to upgrade. It was so easy. After the locknut budged, I immediately tried turning the recoil tube. It turned with little effort. I am now the very proud owner of an expensive pile of parts waiting for reassembly. Thank you.

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Good deal. Glad it helped. Reinstallation is pretty straight forward. The hardest part is getting the existing unit off. Just note how far you need to screw the recoil tube in. You should be able to screw the new unit from Numrich Arms in by hand. The only thing that keeps this locked in place is the lock nut and a reapplication of thread locker.

 

Aligning it properly is pretty easy with the collapsible stock in hand.

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One other comment on reinstalling the new recoil tube unit. Be careful on how far to screw the unit into the receiver. If the unit is screwed in too far, the trigger housing/fire control group will not seat when you go to reassemble the gun. The end of the trigger housing butts right up next to the back on the recoil tube. Before applying locktite, you might want to dry fit it and make sure everything goes togther as designed.

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mhawley is correct. Take a picture of the inside of your receiver to note the depth in which the tube must be seated. Good luck finding a photo of the inside of the recoil tube on the internet -- I looked.

 

I screwed mine in so that it was flush with the inside of the receiver. Then indexed it as needed. Locktite is mandatory, since you can screw the recoil tube in by hand. The jam nut acts as a safety to prevent it from moving. Locktite both in place. It would be quite embarassing for this tube to break loose during firing. Your stock would likely twist 90 degrees while you have it shouldered.

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