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timb99

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Everything posted by timb99

  1. Looks good trapshooter1 If you want a good diagram of the dimensions, go to http://www.shootata.com On the menu on the left, click "About the ATA" The there's a link to the "ATA rule book and by-laws," then a link to "View the Rolebook" Its a pdf file of the entire rule book. Go to pages 56 and 57 and there is a layout of the field. I'm always amazed at how narrow the target angles are on paper, and how wide they "seem" when I'm shooting a hard right from station 5. Oh, and the NRA says to account for a 300 yard shot fall distance. I don't think 7-1/2's rea
  2. You can approximate ATA targets by marking a point 10 yards out from the machine, and another one 50 yards out from the machine (at the club we take the measurements pretty closely, and use a transit and get the angles precise, but for a home field, you don't have to be that precise.) At the 10 yard marker, the target is supposed to be between 8 feet and 10 feet above the level of the release of the machine (essentially the plate where the target flies from.) We use a t-bar made out of 3 inch PVC pipe. Remember, its 8 - 10 feet above the level of the target thrower plate, not the base o
  3. Not remarkable. I do that in one day at any ATA shoot I go to with my O/U. 100 singles, 100 handicap, 50 pair doubles. If a gun fits you, it won't punish you.
  4. sich 1, In my opinion, a long shot string is undesirable, generally speaking. There used to be a prevailing wisdom that a long shot string could get you targets (or birds) on long crossing shots. Most folks who study the ballistics now say that a short shot string is almost always preferred to a long one. A short shot string has a denser pattern in all three dimensions. But the truth is, your statement, "no ordinary shooter will ever notice much difference" is probably true. I have killed a bunch of pheasants with a 20 gauge, so it can do the job, no doubt. S
  5. My ATA lifetime average is about 94.4% (about 23.6 per 25), but that includes some early years with very low averages when I first started. This doesn't include league and practice. My best year was 2006 where I finished with a 95.75% average (23.9 out of 25.) This season my average is 94.5% (97/100, 90/100 bummer, and 191/200.) My best single score ever was 198 out of 200 at the Kansas State Shoot a few years back. Broke a 23 on the first 25, then 175 straight. Didn't even win me anything. At the big shoots, you have to be perfect, and even then, you finish in a tie and hav
  6. Well you may not be paying it, but it is not correct to say that you don't have to. You ARE supposed to, by law, voluntarily pay it. But there's currently no way of enforcing it.
  7. In both cases, the 12 gauge will (according to many sources) throw a better pattern than the 20. Not sure I completely understand the physics, but the larger diameter barrel and the shorter height of the shot in the shot cup are factors.
  8. Probably. When you get to 27, your success, or lack thereof, has more to do with you than the choke you choose. I've only gotten as far back as 25 in ATA (now at 24.)
  9. Depending on who you get your chokes from, there's almost no difference between a light full and an improved modified. Kinda splitting hairs there.
  10. I'd go with a modified choke for doubles and singles, and in handicap until about 22 yards, then an IM until you get back to about 25, then a full from 26 or 27. Just my opinion, and your mileage may vary.
  11. "Can we go back to the reasonable man standard here guys?" "No offense intended, but some of you need to lighten up a bit & tailor your posts to the person you are responding to." There's nothing in your original or succeeding posts that would lead anyone to the conclusion you know anything at all about reloading, hence the words of caution.
  12. Rocky Bear in mind your point blank range for that 30-30 will be much less than 250 yards, but the ballistics tables will help you with that.
  13. Are you shooting a semi-auto or an over-under for doubles?
  14. Good info from Tucker. One item of note, my rifle has similar ballistics to Tucker's but I set my "zero" way out there. If you set your 100 yard bullet strike at about 2.5" to 3" high, your point blank range extends a ways out there, to about 250 yards. That is, point blank means the elevation of the bullet does not deviate more than 3" above, nor 3" below the line of sight of your rifle scope. But a good start is the ballistics tables, so you know what you're dealing with. For deer, if you shoot at the heart/lungs, +/- 3", you'll hit something vital. I'm a traditionalis
  15. How far back in handicap? If you're only shooting 20-22 yards, modified is (typically) enough. If you're going to shoot at 25 yards, an improved modified might be a better choice. 27? Full.
  16. Chokes are funny. You can call them whatever you want, but in the end, you don't really know what you have until you see what the pattern looks like on pattern paper. That being said...generally: Light modified is OK if you tend to shoot fast. If not, use a modified. Generally I shoot a modified for 16 yard singles. I shoot 1 ounce of 8-1/2 shot. You will find that most trap shooters prefer a tighter choke. (Leo Harrison is often quoted as having said, "you can use any choke you want, as long as its a full choke.") If you use a light modified and find you are "dr
  17. Chokes are funny. You can call them whatever you want, but in the end, you don't really know what you have until you see what the pattern looks like on pattern paper. That being said...generally: Light modified is OK if you tend to shoot fast. If not, use a modified. Generally I shoot a modified for 16 yard singles. I shoot 1 ounce of 8-1/2 shot. You will find that most trap shooters prefer a tighter choke. (Leo Harrison is often quoted as having said, "you can use any choke you want, as long as its a full choke.") If you use a light modified and find you are
  18. tokenwhitemale, If you want the answers to your questions, I recommend you pick up the phone and call the powder manufacturers and ask their technicians. Hodgdon is just down the road from where I live, I know some of the Hodgdon family members, and their techs are always helpful. Try to get Ron Reiber if you call Hodgdon. Ron is one of their product line managers, not to mention he's a master class sporting clays shooter, who almost always uses a 28 gauge. Good guy.
  19. Using loads that are not in a published powder manufacturer's data book is unwise, at best, unless you've actually sent samples to a reputable testing facility, and know the peak pressure. Using a load recommended by someone on an internet forum like this, especially one that is not published in a powder manufacturer's data book, is downright stupid. There are SOOOO many volumes of published, known safe data available, why anyone would go out on their own and use an untested, off the books load is beyond my ability to comprehend. JMHO
  20. Cranfield, E-mails don't work very well with Benelli CS. Better to call them.
  21. I have some Briley companion tubes in .410 I use in our company skeet league. Our league is handicapped (kinda like a company golf league, so the so-so guys have a chance against the good shooters) and you get a slightly bigger handicap if you use a smaller gauge. I'm no skeet shooter, that's for sure, but I finshed this league with an 86% average with the .410.
  22. Mike Allee is one of the best in the KC Metro area. If I can't fix it myself, I take it to Mike.
  23. Doggone it Buzz, there you go blowing my cover as a shotgun shooting know-it-all. I had these folks all convinced I knew something. BTW, whomever reads this thread, take Buzz64's word as gospel. He's a Master Class sporting clays shooter. The rest of us are not worthy ;-)
  24. I've never shot 350 straight. You should join the ATA and enter some competitions. I'm sure you'll win.
  25. Please re-read my post. I never said you couldn't be successful with a field gun shooting trap. I said there are valid reasons why competition shooters typically don't use field guns. I also never said there was anything wrong with field guns. Indeed, I have many more field guns than I have competition guns. But field guns are made for the field, and competition guns are made for competition, and there's a big difference between them, and its not just the price.
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