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timb99

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Everything posted by timb99

  1. Uh, start with a thorough cleaning?
  2. timb99

    black shotguns

    Still don't get the camo thing.
  3. I don't know much about the Vinci. I've only seen one, and only for a few minutes. Its "newfangled." The thing the 1100 and 391 have that the Vinci doesn't have (or shall I say, doesn't have yet) is proof of longevity. There are 40 year old 1100's still firing away. The Vinci was introduced last year.
  4. Easy Beretta 391 or Remington 1100/1187
  5. Not suggesting blacking out the entire lens. Just a small piece of scotch tape, large enough, and properly placed so your dominant eye can't see the end of the barrel.
  6. dooderman, We're just going to have to politely agree to disagree. Some of the stuff you said in your post is either: 1. Just plain incorrect. or 2. Long held shotgun shooter's firmly held beliefs that have been handed down over the years, and a lot of folks simply believe them because we've been told over and over that its true. Many of these firmly held beliefs have never been proven, and are simply not true. But I will give you this. You're 100% right when you say, "When one clay matters, physics and engineering sometimes will not go along with what people feel." But that doesn't mean the physics and engineering are wrong. Good shooting. If you're a master class sporting clays shooter, you're a better shot than I am, that's for sure! Keep it up! Tim
  7. Copper plated shot is most commonly (except in a few cases) really just chilled shot with a copper wash. Its not truly "plated." And it doesn't really do much of anything to help shot deformation or pattern better. A lot of people will claim it reduces feather draw into the meat of downed birds, but I have not seen any evidence that would lead me to believe it is remarkably better than plain old lead. In my field reloads, I use high antimony "magnum" shot from Remington or Lawrence, and it seems to work fine. I know several folks who like the "top notch" copper plated pheasant loads from Federal, Remington, Fiocchi, etc. but I think they like them mostly because they're high velocity loads. These do work well. Early season, just about anything will work. Late season where the shots are longer and the birds feathers are tougher, the heavy loads are recommended. JMHO
  8. dooderman, I'm an engineer. If you remove metal, you reduce strength. Simple as that. It must be done properly, to be sure, to assure it doesn't weaken the barrel to the point of failure. I don't mean to get into a big argument, but these modifications cannot reduce recoil. Backboring removes weight from the gun, and in all formulas for recoil, the weight of the gun is in it. Weight goes down, recoil goes up. If you add weight to your gun, I guarantee that will reduce recoil. I think the trigger job is the best way to improve the gun. And shooting more targets.
  9. I'd still do some pattern testing before you pull the trigger (pun intended) on barrel mods. I'd look into a freeware program called shotgun insight. Shoot some patterns on paper at your skeet distances, take some digital photos, and get detailed output for pattern density. Make sure you really need them. Barrel mods can never be undone. If you do decide to do it, I have heard (though I've never had it done myself) that Tom Wilkinson is one of the best. But like I said, I'm not convinced its necesary.
  10. Waste of money. Neither of these things will reduce recoil, because physics says they can't. Despite what a lot of gun magazine writers and the average joe a the club might say. Both modifications do indeed weaken the barrel. The other thing it probably does is to void your warranty from Benelli. They'll probably refuse to ever work on your gun again. Backboring "might" improve your patterns, but I'd pattern the gun first. You probably don't need any modification at all. Spend your money on targets, lessons, or as dooderman said, a good trigger job.
  11. If you're buying a gun mainly for trap shooting, get a trap gun. Neither of these guns are particularly well suited for trap shooting. If your budget is an issue, and if recoil is an issue, I'd recommend a used Remington 1100 Trap model.
  12. Look here for Vari-Brite Sight III and Sight-Blinder http://www.battenfieldsportinggoods.com/gunacc.htm Here's the Easy Hit sight page http://www.easyhit.com/
  13. http://www.shotgunreport.com/TechTech/TechnoidArchive/18-Nov-08.pdf Have a look at this. Some good info in there.
  14. 1. Keep trying to shoot left-handed. Its the best solution in the long run. My daughter is right-handed and left eye dominant. She shoots left-handed. You may be well served by taking wingshooting lessons from someone. Look for an NSCA instructor in your area. 2. If that doesn't work (and give it plenty of time) try shooting right-handed with a piece of scotch tape over your left lens so your left eye can't see the end of the barrel. 3. There are other products, like sight blinders that attach to the side of the rib that prevents your left eye from seeing the bead, and special tube type beads that allow you to see the fiber optic bead only if your eye is directly lined up with the rib. Good luck.
  15. First question - did you clean it thoroughly before you shot it?
  16. I'd go with a Remington 1187 Sportsman Youth. A little less costly than the other two, and the softest shooter of the three. And with a new stock and a new barrel, convertible to a full size gun when he grows out of it (don't know if the others will do that too, but probably.)
  17. First comment. DON'T LOOK AT THE BEADS! Both eyes should be focused on the target, whether thats a clay bird or a feathered bird! If your gun fits you and you keep your head on the stock, you shouldn't lose your alignment. I STRONGLY recommend wearing some form of eye protection when shooting, whether it be hunting or target shooting. At most target shooting ranges, its mandatory, and it should be that way. And when you're out hunting, there is plenty of "crap" out there that can get in your eyes. Protect them! When I hunt, I have a pair of Bolle Parole sunglasses with a prescription insert. I do NOT include my bifocal prescription in these lenses. Its of no use. You should be focused on the bird, and if you're taking the time to line up the beads when a bird flushes, well, that's not a very good recipe for success. When I shoot targets, I have a pair of Post-4 prescription shooting glases. Again, with these, I do NOT include my bifocal prescription, because, like hunting, its of no use. You should be focused, both eyes on the clay target.
  18. Two messages sent.

     

    Good luck.

     

    Tim

  19. How much money you have available to spend on an O/U, and whether you want to buy new or used, somewhat dictates what you can buy. If you have $300 and really want an O/U, your options are very limited. On the other hand, if you have $10,000, you have no such limitations. Browning makes very, very nice guns. The gunshop guy is full of [email protected] With advice like that, I'd consider buying elsewhere. All of these companies make excellent O/U's: Browning Franchi Beretta SKB Winchester Ruger Remington Perazzi Zoli Krieghoff Caesar Guerini Renato Gamba Merkel There are others, I'm sure.
  20. Are you shooting buffered shot shells? If not, I'd give it a try.
  21. Message sent. Good luck.

     

    Tim

  22. Two e-mails sent.

     

    Good luck,

     

    Tim

  23. Native birds, or pen-raised? Didn't know Texas had places with that many birds.
  24. Congrats. Pheasants are a kick. I'm an addict. Nothing like the rush you feel when a rooster flushes near you. Handsome dogs, too.
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