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Most rounds through Benelli


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Approximately 13,000 through my M4. Much of the weapon was replaced by Benelli though at the 10,000 round mark. Barrel, BCG, Handguards to address the crappy 4 port barreled models.

 

The receiver extension was replaced at about 13,000. It looked brand new, but I wanted a functional collapsible stock.

 

Probably 10,000 rounds of birdshot, 2000 rounds of buckshot and a 1000 rounds of slugs.

 

I'm sitting on about 6000 rounds now. I no longer purchase low base birdshot. It's just not any fun to shoot. I now buy high brass #4 birdshot for target loads.

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Approximately 13,000 through my M4. Much of the weapon was replaced by Benelli though at the 10,000 round mark. Barrel, BCG, Handguards to address the crappy 4 port barreled models.

 

The receiver extension was replaced at about 13,000. It looked brand new, but I wanted a functional collapsible stock.

 

Probably 10,000 rounds of birdshot, 2000 rounds of buckshot and a 1000 rounds of slugs.

 

I'm sitting on about 6000 rounds now. I no longer purchase low base birdshot. It's just not any fun to shoot. I now buy high brass #4 birdshot for target loads.

 

IRT the birdshot, are you shooting sheet or trap for that? If so, are you using the T1 for that too? That's a lot of rounds!

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25,000 steel shot loads through a 1991 SBE, most of it in the 1990's & early 2000's :)

 

Got to be a few 100,000+ shell guns out there....

 

Much the same as mudhen with "BA" PROOF code 1991 SBEs but with south-of-the-border Remington "Hecho in Mexico" super dirty burning lead shotshells. Some of the early M1s we used in Mexico will have well over that round count: easily 50K plus. Benelli M1s/SBEs took a licking and kept on ticking. Remington 1100s & 1187s fell by the wayside but to their credit did not recoil nearly as much as the inertia Benellis.

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Inertia-driven recoil is nothing. Maybe if you're "sensitive" but then maybe you shouldn't be shooting a 12 gauge. :D The Benelli inertia-driven guns are simple, reliable, and effective. They blow away any gas-operated semi-auto IMHO (well, maybe except for the M4). YMMV :)

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After shooting 3 cases of 12ga. shotshells per day for 5 days, you would definately notice the difference in recoil level of the intertia driven Benellis and the gas operated Remingtons. My cheek would be bleeding after 3-4 days of shooting Benellis. Here is a pic of one day's shooting at Lake Guererro: 1200+ birds. My group had a Calcutta bet going on the most birds shot this day. Problem was some of the bird boys pictured would eat the birds raw so I had to get them some sandwiches to get them to quit eating my birds.

 

1200dovesinMX.jpg

Edited by leid
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After shooting 3 cases of 12ga. shotshells per day for 5 days, you would definately notice the difference in recoil level of the intertia driven Benellis and the gas operated Remingtons. My cheek would be bleeding after 3-4 days of shooting Benellis. Here is a pic of one day's shooting at lake Guererro: 1200+ birds.

 

1200dovesinMX.jpg

 

I seriously doubt if a gas operated Remington could survive 3cs/day for 5 days.:eek:

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The Remingtons did not do well at all; lots of MTX. I was the armorer for the hunting group. Remington had an ammunition plant in Mexico but they used an extremely dirty burning powder in their 12ga. shells; a flake powder that looked like Unique. After a full day's shooting, you could literally dump the unburned powder out of the 1100 breach. Benellis ate the Mexican ammo with ease. The 2 guys that did go to Argentina gave their Rem 1100 410s to their guides as "presents" when they left. But after a week of shooting, they were literally shot out/shot loose. Hunting Mexico convinced me of the reliability of the Benelli M1/SBE. The first year we hunted Mexico, only one guy had a Benelli M1; I was using a 1958 Rem model 1100 that broke on me several times a day. A few years later, everyone was using M1s or the newly released SBE. I am still using my 1991 SBE today. An interesting note: the bird boys pictured were guaranteed $1 per day each (about 1993). Today, I don't dare go down to old Mexico to hunt; much too dangerous now.

Edited by leid
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Sorry, I'm just not that sensitive to recoil. And, if your cheek was bleeding, like you say, after 3-4 days of shooting then I would think you are not shouldering the weapon properly. I have never had that happen and I do multiple days of skeet and chukkar hunting each year where it isn't uncommon to put up several hundred birds a day.

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If you're bruising, you're doing something wrong.

Either the LOP is wrong for you, or you're not holding in the proper location. Or, you might want to check your background, since you might be related to the thought to be extinct Russian Czars.

 

Back when my M4 was new, and ammo was cheap, I was feeding it about 300 - 400 rounds per session.

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Remember that song by the Village People, Macho Man? There seems to be one in every crowd. 1200 rounds a day on an Argentina pigeon shoot for 3 days, no problem-mo. A few years ago they used to feature the Argentino hunts on the Outdoor channel. They would have guys just to carry around extra shotguns and more guys to reload the shotguns for you.

 

When I go bird hunting, if I fire 15-20 rounds in a day, I mark the date on my calender as a special occasion to remermber. I can't imagine firing 1200 rounds in one day. By the time I got to 600 count, my fingers would be ripped up by sloppy loading. My shoulder bruised from sloppy shoulder placement and my face and jaw bruised from sloppy gun handling.

 

I suppose if you're going to participate in a big Argentina shoot, you would practise in advance and toughen yourself up. For me, an exciting part of those shows would be after the shoot each night, they would show the armorers cleaning the shotguns. The shear volume of gunk coming out of each shotgun was amazing. Then they would drag over a box of Remington and Winchester spare parts and start fixing the guns the broke that day.

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Shooter fatique from sheer volume, firing at unusual angles, and spending half the night shooting rabbits/coyotes/Cascavel rattlesnakes all took their toll on technique. A couple of days of that is fun but it flat wears you down quickly after that. I fired 500 rounds of assorted 2 3/4", 3", & 3.5" loads on Thursday to break in an M2 & an SBEII. That pounding motivated me to work out the details on replacing the Benelli OEM hard rubber recoil pads on the M2 & SBEII with Limbsavers this morning.

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  • 3 years later...
  • 3 years later...

What does LOP mean. I am a new Benelli m4 owner and took it out to the range this weekend and I am bruised. So, I am betting I am doing something wrong. I read a comment above about poor LOP and I am not sure what that means.

Edited by Tallcane
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