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New FFT Stuff

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Anyone foresee any issues running the FFT trigger and disconnector with the hammer?

 

Meant to ask about FFT trigger and disconnector with GEISSELE hammer, sorry.

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I received my package today as well. Just finished the install and took some technical data. G = Grams.

 

Factory Trigger: 24.31g

Factory Disconnector: 3.59g

Factory Hammer: 13.87g

 

FFT Trigger: 23.89g

FFT Disconnector: 3.49g

FFT Hammer: 14.06g

 

Carriercomp/Geissele Hammer: 14.30g

 

I tested the FFT Trigger and Disconnector with the Carriercomp/Geissele Hammer. No issues were encountered. I did feel that the FFT hammer offered a smoother trigger break than the carriercomp/Geissele unit. I attribute this to the surface coating on the FFT parts.

 

ben-M4.gif

 

Dimensionally, the parts are the same for the most part when comparing them side by side. The FFT parts along with the Carriercomp/Geissele Hammer have better overall machining and polished edges. While the Carriercomp/Geissele Hammer appears to be polished better, I believe this is simply because FFT coated their parts with a nickel type finish. The trigger itself is NP3 coated. So expect your trigger to have a dull grey appearance after the install.

 

The installation instructions are thorough, although I would recommend they give a schematic picture with the kit for reference. Or Perhaps a few photos for reference. The install took me about 45 minutes. I was taking my time and had the help of a three year old. I took the time to clean out the trigger pack after 13k rounds.

 

The Trigger

Decock the hammer. Don't allow the hammer to slam against the trigger housing. Control its decent with your thumb as you pull the trigger. Tapping out the trigger pin (Part #20) is pretty easy. There doesn't seem to be much resistance. Once the pin is removed, the punch acts as a slave pin that holds the trigger assembly in place. Pay attention to part number 23 during the removal of the trigger pin. This is the shell release lever spring. You don't want to pinch the spring and bend it with your punch. I used a punch that was one size smaller than the OD of the pin so there was some room around the punch.

 

Use your thumb to relieve the spring tension from the trigger, and retain the trigger pack in the trigger housing as you remove the punch. The trigger will rock out of the housing and pull out. Be careful though, there is a spring along the bottom of the trigger (Part #7). Remove the spring from the trigger. This spring simply pulls out.

 

The Disconnector

The disconnector is held in place by a small pin (Part #2). Using a small enough punch, relieve spring tension on the disconnector and simply push Part #2 out. If it won't simply push out, you may need a 2 or 4 ounce hammer. Once removed, control the disconnector as it pulls out. The disconnector spring (Part #3) and plunger (Part #4) will simply pull out of the disconnector.

 

Installation of new Disconnector

Install the spring and plunger into the FFT disconnector. I recommend putting some thick lubricant on the plunger while you have it out. I use Brian Enos Slide Glide. Test fit the disconnector into the FFT Trigger. Compress the spring and plunger and align the pin hole on the trigger to the pin hole on the disconnector. The pin is very small and difficult to manipulate with your fingers. Once you align the holes properly, you should be able to simply press the pin in with finger tension.

 

Reinstallation of the Trigger Pack

I recommend a thick lubricant be applied to the engagement hooks of the disconnector and the trigger at this point. A small amount on the side of the trigger wouldn't hurt. Observe the original factory trigger. Look for wear marks. If it burnished in a specific area, apply a small amount of lubricant. Install the trigger spring (Part #7) into the trigger pack. The spring is simply a press fit. Rock the trigger pack into the trigger group. The trigger fits against a notch in the back of the trigger group housing. Look through the side of the trigger housing and visually align the the holes for the trigger pin. Insert the trigger pin (Part #20) from the left side. The Trigger pack will tap in fairly easily, however do not push the trigger pin all the way in yet. You need to reinstall the shell drop lever spring (Part #23) before inserting the trigger pin all the way into the trigger pack. This job would really benefit to having a second person. I didn't have one. So I held the trigger pack in one hand. My second hand had the hammer to tap the trigger pin (Part #20) from the left side. I then compressed the spring with a small punch. I had the punch guided with my hand that was holding the trigger group, and I had the end of the punch pressed off my chin. As soon as the spring was guided into place, I tapped the trigger pin (Part #20) into place which also retains the shell drop lever spring (Part #23).

 

Removal of the Factory Hammer

Make sure the hammer is decocked before beginning. Using a pair of snap ring pliers, remove The Trigger Guard Spring (Part #15). Once removed, press the Trigger Pin Bushing (Part #17) partially out. You do not want to remove this bushing completely. You only want to push it out far enough to remove the hammer.

 

Once out, I recommend pulling out the Hammer Spring (Part #10) and Hammer Spring Cap (Part #11). You will have to shift the Shell Release Lever (Part #18) over to get the engagement hook off of the top of the plunger. A lot of crap builds up inside here since it is impossible to clean out when assembled. Clean everything up and apply a thick lubricant.

 

Reinsert the Hammer Spring (Part #10) and the Hammer Spring Cap (Part #11). Re-engage the hook from the shell release. Apply a thick lubricant to the sides the hammer around the bushing hole. Lubricant should also be applied to the engagement hooks on the hammer and on the face of the hammer that contacts the bolt carrier. Press the Trigger Pin Bushing (Part #17) back into place. Reinstall the Trigger Guard Spring (Part #15) with the snap ring pliers. Make sure the snap ring is fully seated onto the groove. I tap on mine with a hammer and punch lightly to make sure it won't move.

 

Assembly and Testing

Reassemble the weapon after making sure all of your lubricant points are coated. Sometimes handling the parts during reassembly can wipe off much of the lubricant you might have placed. Make sure the weapon is empty. Cock the weapon and place the weapon on safe. Pull the trigger several times. Make certain that the hammer does not fall.

 

Remove the weapon from safe. Pull the trigger. Make sure the hammer falls. Do this several times to make certain that it is functioning properly.

 

Now, pull the trigger and hold it to the rear. Cycle the bolt handle to re-cock the weapon. Do not let off on the trigger during this process. This is to test the disconnector to make sure it is functioning. The hammer should not fall until you let off of the trigger and pull it again. Test this several times.

 

This process will spread the lubricant around and begin mating the engagement surfaces.

 

Conclusion

The trigger pull is certainly lighter and much more crisp. Some of this may be attributed to being cleaned after 13k rounds and properly lubricated. Installation was easier than I had expected. I also became a little more familiar with the inner workings of the trigger assembly. Such as, I do not believe the shell elevator deactivates the disconnector anymore. It seems the only thing that keeps the disconnector in play is the bolt carrier group pressing the hammer down. Once the bolt carrier group stops riding the hammer, the disconnector is no longer in play.

 

Is the trigger worth the price of admission? If it was simply about getting a better trigger, not really. It's nice, but it's a shotgun. Parts count wise, it is certainly worth it. Three US Made parts for 140 bucks shipped? I'm well over the required number of US Made parts now to use the collapsible stock. I get to use the factory handguards which is always desirable.

1. carriercomp Full length magazine tube

2. Brownells US Made magazine follower

3. FFT Trigger

4. FFT Disconnector

5. FFT Hammer

 

Installation was easier than expected. It would be a nightmare without the right tools though. You NEED to have a pair of snap ring pliers. Assorted punches. Lightweight hammer.

 

I'll try to get a few pictures. Sadly my camera was dead when the new parts arrived.

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Well done SD, well done. I'd be getting the parts if I wasn't already compliant with the stuff I have.

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Thanks. Either way, if you have a high amount of rounds on the weapon, I highly recommend pulling the hammer plunger and spring. It's pretty easy to get out and it feels much better after it was cleaned and lubricated. A thick lubricant grease is needed to really get the benefits here.

 

The action cycles much more smoothly since the hammer gets pressed downward as the BCG retracts to the rear each time.

 

Doing this tear down earlier gave me quite a bit of perspective about how the trigger group works. Before, I just assumed it was magic.

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Thanks, Stranger; I always enjoy your reviews/ comments. I just got my FFT trigger pack today and am looking forward to the install (currently has the Geissele/ CC hammer).... no doubt it will be much easier with the detailed guide you provided.

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Just installed the new hammer, disconector, and trigger. It was much easier than I expected. For me, the hardest part was removing the snap ring from the hammer pin. Can't wait to test it out on Saturday! Woohoo!

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Wrinkles,

Does your action feel any different now that you dropped the new parts in?

 

Honestly, I have only shot 100 rounds through the gun so I don't have a great feel for the trigger. I will say that I like the feel of it with the new parts installed.

 

My main reason for adding the parts was not for a Berger feeling trigger but for .992r compliance. I also installed a FFT Ti full length tube. That was easy due to following the directions you posted on that topic in the past. Thanks for contributing all your knowledge!

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Thanks. Glad to help.

 

The camera I used is a mid ranged camera. It's a **** Cybershot DSC-H10. The macro setting works pretty well on it. Natural ambient light always helps.

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Great info StrangerDanger, as always.

 

Quick question, how are you mounting that light on your Benelli M4 these days? I see you ditched the Surefire handguard.

 

I wonder where I can get a collapsible stock for a reasonable price. I still haven't tried the standard stock yet due to the weather and work.

 

Thanks!

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Last month, I picked up a BLAM4 mount to mount the light and sling to. The primary goal was to cut weight and get the sweet ergonomics of the factory handguards. I probably cut 4 or 5 ounces of weight in the move.

 

The BLAM4 isn't perfect by any means, but it gets the job done. The light is positioned in a good location for thumb activation.

 

Dumping the Surefire M80 also meant I lost a 922® compliance part, which spurred me to jump on these FFT trigger group parts.

 

I would not pay the extreme prices for the collapsible stocks at the moment. There is a chance that Benelli will begin selling them directly to the public since they're going to be selling M4's with a functional collapsible stock in the very near future.

 

Back in the old days, Benelli sold the stocks for about 160 dollars new. Given the Obamanomics of late and the devaluation of the dollar as a result; we'd probably be looking at a sale price of around 190 - 200.

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So gentlemen, how long does this install take from start to finish?

 

Took me probably 20 minutes and most of that was trying to get my snap ring pliers to grab the hammer pin snap ring. I had to grind them down for another project so they don't work like they should.

 

Some things that helped me, when you push the trigger pin go left to right. Don't push it all the way out. If you push it just far enough to remove the trigger, the you won't have to contend with the shell release lever spring upon assembly. Also holding the trigger upside-down, placing the trigger spring into the hole in the bottom if the trigger, and then sliding the trigger into the FCG fram while it is held upside down will help with not loosing the trigger spring and make it easier to seat the trigger into place. I know that sounds complicated, but it's not. It will all make sense one you start.

 

The parts come with good instructings and other here have posted some good advice that will assist you.

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Took me probably 20 minutes and most of that was trying to get my snap ring pliers to grab the hammer pin snap ring. I had to grind them down for another project so they don't work like they should.

 

Some things that helped me, when you push the trigger pin go left to right. Don't push it all the way out. If you push it just far enough to remove the trigger, the you won't have to contend with the shell release lever spring upon assembly. Also holding the trigger upside-down, placing the trigger spring into the hole in the bottom if the trigger, and then sliding the trigger into the FCG fram while it is held upside down will help with not loosing the trigger spring and make it easier to seat the trigger into place. I know that sounds complicated, but it's not. It will all make sense one you start.

 

The parts come with good instructings and other here have posted some good advice that will assist you.

 

 

thank you for your help with this. I can visualize the steps as you are describing them. What kinda grease are people using to lubricate the hammer, trigger and disconnector assembly? It sure looks like grease as opposed to gun lube.

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I am no grease monkey, so take if for what it's worth, I use white lithium grease for most occasions. On the parts that rotate use oil. I use RemOil. Again, YMMV. SD recommended machine gunners lube.

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