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Huff64

Carrier Comp tubes hesitation

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they charge CC right off bat and will credit card back if not in stock. that happened to me no big deal really. I belive his website shoes if in stock or not now?

regarless if he was to take cash now and you get in 3 weeks who cares you get product. this assuming you dont need that money to live on. if so then dont buy anyways I guess

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they charge CC right off bat and will credit card back if not in stock. that happened to me no big deal really. I belive his website shoes if in stock or not now?

regarless if he was to take cash now and you get in 3 weeks who cares you get product. this assuming you dont need that money to live on. if so then dont buy anyways I guess

 

That's correct, Kip goes overboard to make sure your funds are not 'held up'. Order with confidence.

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Hi all

 

Im seriously concidering ordering a

http://www.shop.carriercomp.com/product.sc?productId=3&categoryId=4

 

But ive heard there are back order issues. Any clue if my CC will be charged 3 - ? weeks or what ever before i get a presant on my door step ?. :confused:

 

Just do it!!! If you regret it after it arrives you will be the only one that I've ever heard of in the "I regret ordering it" column.

 

Later,

 

Hookster :)

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Hi all

 

Im seriously concidering ordering a

http://www.shop.carriercomp.com/product.sc?productId=3&categoryId=4

 

But ive heard there are back order issues. Any clue if my CC will be charged 3 - ? weeks or what ever before i get a presant on my door step ?. :confused:

 

This is a copy of that detail from their home page;

 

Due to our Merchant service software parameters, back-ordered items will invoice at the 25 day mark, or within 7 days of shipping, which ever occurs 1st. Customers uncomfortable with this necessity, may opt for a courteous and prompt refund from "carriercomp".

I do notice an authorization within a day or so of ordering items from them, but never actually charged until 3 or 4 weeks later as described, unless it was for an in stock item, then the initial authorization became an up front charge.

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Carriercomp's tube is the tube to get. It's unmatched in quality. You'll see what I mean when you first pick it up. You're gonna have it for a long long time so a wait of a few weeks really isn't a big deal. You bought a Benelli, you want the best.

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Today marks the fourth week since I placed my order....

 

Can't wait to get it, get it installed and then head out to the gun club to give it a good workout.

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Just a PSA, but use Loctite 243 if your install is to be "semi-permanent" (i.e. not removed after every range trip). Loctite 242 does not play well with Ti and anodized Al. Very little/no adhesion.

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Guest cleefurd
Just a PSA, but use Loctite 243 if your install is to be "semi-permanent" (i.e. not removed after every range trip). Loctite 242 does not play well with Ti and anodized Al. Very little/no adhesion.

Bank on the above. JG has put a lot more effort and research into this than he lets on. Loctite forms a crystaline structure, which is less elongated on non-ferrous metals like titanium and anodized surfaces. That crystaline structure is exactly what opposes rotation of the parts. As an anerobic adhesive (cures in the absense of air) 242 will form a bond, but that bond is inferior on non-ferrous applications like titanium tubes etc. From Uno's research, which included contacting the manufacturer, and pouring over product data information, he educated me on this improved option. Loctite #243 is new, and the way to go if one intends to introduce medium strength adhesion to any components where steel is not part of the equation.

He (Uno) sent us a sample of the 243, and when I get a chance I look forward to trying it out. Stuff is not cheap, but has many uses. Good investment.

I owe you one Uno.

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Bank on the above. JG has put a lot more effort and research into this than he lets on. Loctite forms a crystaline structure, which is less elongated on non-ferrous metals like titanium and anodized surfaces. That crystaline structure is exactly what opposes rotation of the parts. As an anerobic adhesive (cures in the absense of air) 242 will form a bond, but that bond is inferior on non-ferrous applications like titanium tubes etc. From Uno's research, which included contacting the manufacturer, and pouring over product data information, he educated me on this improved option. Loctite #243 is new, and the way to go if one intends to introduce medium strength adhesion to any components where steel is not part of the equation.

He (Uno) sent us a sample of the 243, and when I get a chance I look forward to trying it out. Stuff is not cheap, but has many uses. Good investment.

I owe you one Uno.

 

You've already done a ton for the community and myself, Kip! I am sorry sending that 243 to you took so long on my part, glad you received it!

 

Loctite 242 CAN be used, but only if the correct Loctite primer is ALSO used. By itself, you might as well spit on it and screw it into the receiver.

Edited by Unobtanium

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Bank on the above. JG has put a lot more effort and research into this than he lets on. Loctite forms a crystaline structure, which is less elongated on non-ferrous metals like titanium and anodized surfaces. That crystaline structure is exactly what opposes rotation of the parts. As an anerobic adhesive (cures in the absense of air) 242 will form a bond, but that bond is inferior on non-ferrous applications like titanium tubes etc. From Uno's research, which included contacting the manufacturer, and pouring over product data information, he educated me on this improved option. Loctite #243 is new, and the way to go if one intends to introduce medium strength adhesion to any components where steel is not part of the equation.

He (Uno) sent us a sample of the 243, and when I get a chance I look forward to trying it out. Stuff is not cheap, but has many uses. Good investment.

I owe you one Uno.

 

Great info that I didn't know.. thanks!

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I never used any loctite when I installed my new CC ti tube. Just cleaned out the receiver threads and screwed the new tube in hand tight. Hasn't moved since, even after a bunch of heavy buckshot.

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I never used any loctite when I installed my new CC ti tube. Just cleaned out the receiver threads and screwed the new tube in hand tight. Hasn't moved since, even after a bunch of heavy buckshot.

 

Me either. Is this a problem???

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I never used any loctite when I installed my new CC ti tube. Just cleaned out the receiver threads and screwed the new tube in hand tight. Hasn't moved since, even after a bunch of heavy buckshot.

 

The tolerances of Kip's initial tubes were different than his current tubes. Kip had to begin making the tubes with more tolerance between the threaded portion and the receiver because a few people could not physically install their tubes. Every time he got a return tube because the Benelli receiver would not accept it, he loosened the fit by an infinitesimal amount. This is because Benelli's tolerances are not as "good" as Kip's. The receivers that would not work were "outliers" that he had not encountered until that time, but if one exists, another likely does, so he took that into consideration in future production runs.

 

The reason I am a fan of Kip's current tubes in lieu of his past production runs (and not scrambling to get an older "tighter" tube) is that they are ever so slightly thicker than in the past. They are literally the strongest Ti magazine tube on the market, bar none. Please note that his +- tolerance standards have not changed. He is just adapting to Benelli's variances so that all of his customers can use his products.

 

I first attached my magazine tube with Mxloc 42, a generic version of Loctite 242 which shares its formula. I used only 1 small drop. By the end of 100 rounds at the range, my magazine tube had come loose. I then used A LOT of the stuff when I re-attached it. I let it dry for 24 hours. During that 24 hours, I researched anaerobic thread-lockers. I did a TON! of research, discovering that the Ti and anodized Al were all but non-reactive. This, coupled with the smooth surface of the Ti threads prevents any kind of meaningful bond. The most you will accomplish is that when the 242 hardens, it will have created a near interference fit for the threads. It won't adhere at all. This is what about 30 seconds with a heat-gun and a VERY SMALL amount of torque from my hands resulted in after a 24 hour cure time. I doubt the heat did much. As a point of reference, I cannot budge my current setup, even if I torque on it as hard as I can.

 

19ovtx.jpg

*Note the perfectly clean threads. It did adhere some to the receiver. Not at all to the Ti tube. I used acetone to prep both surfaces. UN-torquing the tube took what felt like the same torque as I used to tighten it when wet.

 

 

It is my conclusion that the best adhesives for this application are Rocksett, Vibratite VC-3, and Loctite 243. Rocksett is water soluble and has a low yielding torque, but is nearly heat-proof, is not substrate dependent, and acts as a resonance damper. Common use is attaching suppressor mounts. Loctite 243 is like "Super 242". It needs no primer, and is a little more resilient in every way. Common use is industrial. Vibratite VC-3 is a different type of thread-locker. It is a very very viscous vibration damper. Common use: M1 Abram's turret. Regarding ease of removal, I have no experience with Rocksett, but have heard both that it is easy to remove, and very difficult. I will rank it as the "most permanent", followed by 243, followed by VC-3, which is meant specifically for easy removal. Gearscout includes it with their mounts, as do a few others.

 

 

*** Stainless, most shiny plated/coated bolts or nuts, Ti, Anodized Al etc. are all non-reactive, along with a few other metals. FYI, you should use a primer with 242, or use 243, when trying to bond these metals to another non-reactive.

Edited by Unobtanium

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