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rbuzz

Frog Lube products

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I'm just curious, has anyone out there used Frog Lube on their Benelli? I have always used the traditional gun cleaners like Hoppes and similar, but recently after hearing so much about Frog Lube, I decided to try it. I recently purchased a S&W M&P 22 for plinking and decided to treat it with Frog Lube before I even fired it. After cleaning out all of the original grease and oil from assembly, I treated it with Frog Lube twice. I haven't had a chance to fire it yet, but already the action feels amazingly smooth, even better than it did when I first brought it home. I'm really anxious to take it to the range. I've heard so many amazing endorsements concerning this product, that I'm really considering using it on the new Benelli M4 that I have on order when it comes in. I'm usually not one to switch from what I've been using for years, but so far I'm really optimistic about Frog Lube. But I realize that a Benelli M4 is a much more expensive firearm than a 22 pistol, so I don't want to take any chances with it's maintenance. So if anyone out there has used Frog Lube products on their Benelli, let us know what you think of it.

If you haven't heard of Frog Lube, check it out here

http://froglube.com/roothome.htm

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Motor oil works just fine.

 

Thanks for the input, I've used that too in the past. One of the main advantages, I'm told, of using Frog Lube is that it coats the metal and makes cleanup much easier. It supposedly helps contaminants and lead fouling from sticking and not only helps cleaning, it makes the firearms more reliable because it lubricates so well and helps prevent jam ups. Of course any company that is trying to sell their product will tell you that, and that's why I thought it might be helpful if someone who has actually used the product give us their opinion of it. I know that my local gun shop said that Frog Lube is the only product that they use on their guns in their shop.

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I've used it for about a year on my Sig P226 and it's been great. I also used it on my M4, which I've only fired about 50 shells through. It worked flawlessly. I'm a little concerned about the corrosion issue since my safe is in a relatively humid place (and seems to more humid inside than outside, even with a rod and drying agents). Not sure how it will work.

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I recently purchased a SIG716, SIG P220 and a Benelli M4. Ive used Frog Lube each and every time I've cleaned my guns. I love Frog Lube because not only is it for lubing, but you can also use it to clean all the mechanisms in the firearm. I just wish it wasn't so expensive.

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Have not used Frog Lube on my Benelli M4 as of yet as I’m still looking for the right combination while breaking it in. After 300 rounds it still won't handle the cheap, low velocity, steel base rounds. After that....Frog Lube it is!

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Just updating my original post. My Benelli M4 finally came in a couple of weeks ago. I brought it home in pieces, unassembled in it's box. Curiosity got the best of me and I went ahead and assembled it to familiarize myself with the procedure. It's a breeze to both put together and take apart, and what is great, is that you don't even need tools. Anyway, I stripped it down again, gave it a thorough cleaning, and put on two coats of Frog Lube. The action in the Benelli is as slick as can be. When I finally had a chance to shoot it for the first time, I started off with about 25 rounds of high brass and followed immediately with the cheaper Federal loads from Walmart. It handled everything with no problem, even the cheap stuff. I can't say with any certainty that the Frog Lube is responsible for that, but it the action in the M4 seems to operate so smoothly and effortlessly that I plan on the continued use of Frog Lube. Like I said, it handled even the cheap stuff after almost no break in time. The S&W M&P 22 handgun, also operated perfectly on it's first outing after a thorough cleaning followed by two coats of Frog Lube. I noticed too that both guns cleaned up a lot easier than I've seen in the past. I'm sold on the stuff. So much so that I'm switching all of my guns to Frog Lube exclusively.

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You could pee on the M4 and it will still be smooth :o

 

Funny, I took mine to the range right out of the box (no extra lube or cleaning, just assembled the parts as they came from Benelli), ran 75 rounds of buckshot through it without a hiccup.

 

I do plan to try the Frog Lube though.

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I have some of the FL paste and spray CLP. I'm experimenting with it on a 1911. Are you guys using the FL solvent or relying on the cleaning properties of the CLP?

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A friend gave me this product earlier today. Since I have to attend a shoot school tomorrow, I figured I'd give it a try on my Glock 19 Gen 4. I tore the Glock down and put it in my dunk tank filled with odorless mineral spirits. I then hit the parts with the heat gun to dry the mineral spirits off of the parts. I took the Frog Lube paste, and heated it with the heatgun to make it easier to paint on. After thoroughly coating the parts, I allowed them to dry. I then hit them with the heatgun again to liquify the Frog Lube. Then I allowed the parts to cool, and I wiped them down with the supplied microfiber bag.

 

I then reassembled. I nearly ripped the slide off the frame on first cycling it. It's really slick crap. I like that it is dry to the touch after it cools down.

 

Being impressed, I figured I'd try it out on a 22lr conversion kit for my AR15 MRP. It was always gritty and difficult to cycle by hand. After applying the lubricant, it was ball bearing smooth.

 

Similar effects on my Beretta 92g Elite II.

 

We'll see how well it holds up over a light class tomorrow.

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If that's true, I wonder how it would work on a Marlin lever action which doesn't have the smoothest action out there as it's quite gritty.

 

I always thought running a barrel hot is bad? Or is it running it hot and then firing it is bad?

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It's not a miracle cream, if there are big snags, it likely won't smooth them over. It will improve the condition though. Plus, your weapons will smell like those light green tic tacs!

 

I applied this stuff to my FN Five Seven and my Sig P938 a little bit ago. There was a marginal improvement in the FN Five-Seven. Nothing like in the Glock or the Beretta though. The Sig's slide pull weight decreased by several pounds.

Edited by StrangerDanger

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It's not a miracle cream, if there are big snags, it likely won't smooth them over. It will improve the condition though. Plus, your weapons will smell like those light green tic tacs!

 

I applied this stuff to my FN Five Seven and my Sig P938 a little bit ago. There was a marginal improvement in the FN Five-Seven. Nothing like in the Glock or the Beretta though. The Sig's slide pull weight decreased by several pounds.

 

How are people reducing the slide-pull on a pistol with a non-interference fit slide? Take the spring out of your P938? and then operate the slide. Chemically de-grease it, even. If it takes "several pounds" of force (other than overcoming the mainspring for the hammer)...something is WRONG!

 

I tried the Froglube thing and went back to conventional lubricants after rust issues. Froglube is a decent barrier protectant, but does almost nothing chemically to prevent rust. I discovered that on my own "in the field". Had the bolt in my M4 get speckles of rust on the tail after 120 rounds, trip to a friends house where I wiped the BCG down, leaving a light sheen of remaining froglube on it, drove home, and after about 72 hours I broke it down again for a detailed cleaning and saw the rust. I had previously noted rust formation on the BCG by the gas-key, and in the barrel extension, as well, even though I heavily lubed with Froglube, the condensation from gun-scrubber (gets surface cold) apparently attracted enough water to rust the metal ever so slightly.

 

When applied heavily on a chemically prepped/clean surface, Froglube works okay, but in the real world, for me, I have found that it sucks. I can run 1500+ rounds without cleaning through my M4's with Mpro7-LPX, anyway. I gave my Froglube away.

 

*M4=AR platform for sake of this post.

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I think the reduction in pull weight is attributed to the lubricated main spring. Typically on a design where the spring makes contact with either the slide or the frame. Perhaps when the mechanical actions engage one another, like the trigger disconnect on the Glock making contact with the connector. On certain models, overcoming spring pressure on the hammer and sear engagement will give some resistance. Having a lubricant that stays put helps with the feel.

 

I'm looking forward to running it on my blow back 9mm AR15 with some nasty lead ammo. If it's going to choke, it'll be on that crap.

 

I did a pistol class earlier today with the Glock 19. After about 500 rounds of reloads, I had no issues. Granted you can lubricate a Glock with a handful of dirt and it will work. My gen 4 had a little brass to face issues when new. An apex extractor, a white noise extractor bar and a Glockworkz fulcrum duty trigger resolved that. During the class, ejection was consistant.

 

Interesting about the rusting. Out here in Arizona, we don't have much humidity, but sweating situations can be just as bad or worse depending on body chemistry. I will keep an eye on that.

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I think the reduction in pull weight is attributed to the lubricated main spring. Typically on a design where the spring makes contact with either the slide or the frame. Perhaps when the mechanical actions engage one another, like the trigger disconnect on the Glock making contact with the connector. On certain models, overcoming spring pressure on the hammer and sear engagement will give some resistance. Having a lubricant that stays put helps with the feel.

 

I'm looking forward to running it on my blow back 9mm AR15 with some nasty lead ammo. If it's going to choke, it'll be on that crap.

 

I did a pistol class earlier today with the Glock 19. After about 500 rounds of reloads, I had no issues. Granted you can lubricate a Glock with a handful of dirt and it will work. My gen 4 had a little brass to face issues when new. An apex extractor, a white noise extractor bar and a Glockworkz fulcrum duty trigger resolved that. During the class, ejection was consistant.

 

Interesting about the rusting. Out here in Arizona, we don't have much humidity, but sweating situations can be just as bad or worse depending on body chemistry. I will keep an eye on that.

 

Well, did the ejection pattern change from before you used Froglube, to after? If it truly reduced slide-pull effort by several pounds when hand-cycled, it should have a VERY DRAMATIC effect on cycling when fired. Is recoil more violent? I just refuse to believe that a lubricant that isn't as effective at wear prevention as Mobil 1 automotive oil could produce the results you are claiming compared to what you used before.

 

When the stuff came out, I thought of it as snake oil, then I tried it, used it, and still think of it as snake oil. I did run it for a while, though, and form opinions from actual usage.

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I tried the Froglube thing and went back to conventional lubricants after rust issues. Froglube is a decent barrier protectant, but does almost nothing chemically to prevent rust. I discovered that on my own "in the field". Had the bolt in my M4 get speckles of rust on the tail after 120 rounds, trip to a friends house where I wiped the BCG down, leaving a light sheen of remaining froglube on it, drove home, and after about 72 hours I broke it down again for a detailed cleaning and saw the rust. I had previously noted rust formation on the BCG by the gas-key, and in the barrel extension, as well, even though I heavily lubed with Froglube, the condensation from gun-scrubber (gets surface cold) apparently attracted enough water to rust the metal ever so slightly.

 

Interesting. I've had good luck with Froglube, but I've just started storing my firearms in a safe that's in a less than climate controlled environment (with a goldenrod and two ever-dry units) and have been wondering how FL would protect things. I've seen a number of rust tests on FL. Here's the latest I've come across:

 

http://www.boomershooter.com/forums/index.php?/topic/11116-gun-oil-corrosion-test/

 

Obviously doesn't trump your own experience but I definitely find the lube and cleaning properties to be great.

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