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Showing content with the highest reputation since 12/10/2018 in all areas

  1. 5 points
    As a certified firearms instructor, I would preface saying that the best firearm you have is the one you’ll actually carry. The shotgun in the house will do little good standing in the driveway. Every time I have needed a firearm, I have never had the luxury of 30 seconds to go retrieve one. I would recommend seeking profession training to ingrain the firearm rules. I’d recommend both you and your wife attend one since knowing your legal rights is as important as picking a gun. I’d do this before spending a bunch of money.
  2. 5 points
    Hello everyone We have identified 3 companies we will be Partnering with for our metal finishes for the Firearms Industry. The losing of The Robar Companies inc. did not effect any of our OEM accounts , we still have many companies that have been sending us parts for metal finish, Robar (being in the same building) was the only gunsmith shop that was allowed to do firearms directly with us. We will be letting everyone know soon where they can send their firearms and parts to for all our metal finishes.
  3. 4 points
    My Background The M4 is my first shotgun, and I have never taken a formal training class with it. My M4 haD less than 200 rounds through it before this class. My Equipment The Shotgun M4 with a steel 7 round tube, C-stock in the middle position, and the following mods: Surefire Dual Fuel Light on an IWC QD Mount GG&G Bolt Release TTI Shell Lifter Aimpoint T2 on ADM Low Mount FFT Trigger Set and A&S Housing IWC QD Rear Mount VTAC 2 Point Sling Tactical Gear SOE 12 GA Micro Rig The Class This was a “Basic Tactical Shotgun” run by a well-regarded local outfit that I’ve trained with before. It’s the first of a three class progression. This class focused heavily on a handful of items: Understanding how the shotgun patterns and functions at different distances and with different loads. We ran a variety of 00 Buck, #4 Buck, and slug loads at 7, 15, 25, and 50 yards. We then ran the slugs all the way out to 100. This was done from standing, supported kneeling, and even prone position. Learning how to do combat and speed reloads. This was a major emphasis of the training and one that was eye-opening for me. Dynamically loading while engaging multiple reactive targets was fun. Doing “slug select” drills to dynamically change out the round that you have. Concluded with a “shoot house” engaging paper targets The temperature hovered in the low to mid 90s for most of the training, requiring us to build in plenty of water and cooling breaks. Lessons Learned Know what ammo your gun likes: I can say with confidence that I’m never using Fiocchi #4 Buck again. Had multiple, repeated failures to eject/extract that led to a lot of (unexpected, but valuable) experience in failure clearance drills. This was not an issue with either my Federal Tactical slugs or PMC 00 Buck. Malfunction drills require a lot more thinking than an AR or a handgun: It’s not as easy as “tap, rack, bang” with an M4. For example, FTEs because of an extended crimp are not as simple as cycling the bolt and smacking the receiver. Getting a live round back into the chamber once you clear also requires practiced discipline with the manual of arms. You feel every ounce of weight you drop off of this platform: The M4 is a heavy beast, especially when you’re using it for several hours during a 90 degree day. Dropping the Mesa side saddle helped, but I’m looking forward to replacing my steel tube with a titanium one. I may even SBS this thing and drop down to 14” barrel. This is an impressively accurate gun: With a 2 MOA red dot and Truball slugs, I was making consistent spine box hits at 75 yards, and was hitting “minute of man” at 100. I was not truthfully not expecting that out of this gun. For my fellow lefties, you have to work on modifying manual of arms: While the safety can be swapped and things like combat reloads might be easier because of visibility into the bolt, other drills are not. For example, grabbing a round off of a chest rig to do a slug select can be tricky. You have to rotate the gun, tuck it into your armpit, use your left hand to current round and hold it open long enough to drop in the new slug. Anyway, it was a very eye opening experience for me. I’m still sore (birdshot didnt come in in time, so ran the entire course with buck and slugs) and a touch dehydrated, but well worth the time and energy.
  4. 4 points
    The SRO was developed by Trijicon to provide a purpose-built pistol red dot for competition, which the RMR is not. That’s why the SRO has a broader FOV and, most importantly for pistol users, the ability to change the battery without removing the entire optic (something you have to do with the RMR). However, Trijicon’s own reps have gone on record to say that the SRO isn’t built to the same durability standards as the RMR, since the taller glass is more prone to breakage. Before you make the call on an optic and mount, I would encourage you think about what your preferred sight picture is. I have a collapsible stock on my M4, and I find that with it set to my preferred LOP, the factory irons (which I believe the Sync can co-witness with) are actually too low for my taste. This is why I have an Aimpoint T2 on an ADM low mount using the factory pic rail. I find that that gives me the perfect sight picture. YMMV.
  5. 4 points
  6. 4 points
    Glad to see that manual on my G-Drive is of use to people! 😊
  7. 4 points
    “Carrier Loading” (aka Ghost Loading). See page 24 of the USMC M1014 manual LINK to USMC M1014 manual
  8. 3 points
    M1014/11701: Limited edition flag model. Comes with a oem collapsible stock that doesn’t function. The receiver extension is neutered to prevent function. Barrel does not have removable chokes. The original release of 1-2500 came with aluminum trigger frames. Current production flag editions outside of this initial release have polymer frames. Original release had a different barrel design that didn’t have the seating ring that mates against the receiver face. Handguards were slightly different as to account for this seat ring. 922(r) rules apply for modifying the shotgun’s capacity and collapsible stock. 11703: When originally released, this was a 4 port barreled model made for low recoil rounds. Everyone hated it and Benelli would replace the barrel if asked. The shotgun would beat itself to death if standard rounds were used. It also came with the neutered receiver extension. It came with a pistol grip stock. Barrel assembly has removable chokes. Came with an aluminum trigger frame. For some stupid reason, Benelli released this model number again around 2014 with some changes. The barrel is the standard 2 port barrel. It has a regular 3 position receiver extension. It came with a polymer trigger frame. Came with a field stock. Why they didn’t give it its own model number, we will never know. These models are rare to see anymore. 922(r) rules apply for modifying the shotgun’s capacity and collapsible stock. 11707: This is the gold standard model. Comes with a 3 position receiver extension. Barrel is a 2 port barrel with removable chokes. The barrel have the new seat ring design and some modifications to the barrel extension inside the receiver. Early production models came with aluminum trigger frames where as current production models have the polymer ones. We’ve seen some minor changes in finishes on small parts like the Argo plugs and receiver anodizing over the years. Some Receivers almost have an OD green hue. These models come with a 5 round magazine that has a limiter in place. 922(r) rules apply for modifying the shotgun’s capacity and collapsible stock. I will note that 60 were released from Benelli with 7 round magazines and functional collapsible stocks until the ATF made them stop. 11710: This M4 essentially the same as a 11707, but it comes with a field stock. 11711: This model has all of the features of the 11707, but the shotgun was plated in Np3 by Robar. These are quite rare and not to be confused with the Cerakote model that is painted silver to copy the look. These true NP3 plated models are arguably considered the best model due to the performance of the Np3 finish. 922(r) rules apply for modifying the shotgun’s capacity and collapsible stock. 11713: This M4 is a law enforcement model that is 922(R) exempt like the 11721. This model has all of the features of the 11707. The only real difference is it comes with a steel 7 round magazine tube. 11717: This model has all of the features of the 11707, but the shotgun has a three tone desert camo pattern. 922(r) rules apply for modifying the shotgun’s capacity and collapsible stock. 11721: This is a law enforcement model that has all the features of the 11707 but doesn’t have to abide by 922(R) restrictions. It isn’t meant to be sold to civilians, but they often are. They are sold at a premium price. Given that it comes with a collapsible stock, this makes the price more appealing. The shotgun includes a 7 round steel magazine tube. 11723: This is a 14” Entry gun version of the M4 the barrel doesn’t have a removable choke. This would be a NFA firearm. It comes with the field stock. Other features are similar to the 11707/11721. 5 round capacity due to length. 11724: This is a 14” Entry gun version of the M4 the barrel doesn’t have a removable choke. This would be a NFA firearm. It comes with the oem collapsible stock other features are similar to the 11707/11721. 5 round capacity due to length. 11795: This model is similar to the 11707 in features. The only real difference is it is Cerakoted. I have seen both a H2O titanium finish and a dark earth color option. Pistol grip and field stocks can be had under this model. 11796: This is a law enforcement model like the 11713/11724. The only difference is the Cerakote paint options. The firearm is generally sold with the oem collapsible stock and a 7 round magazine tube. There may be other options and models out there. Benelli has a European model with a slightly longer barrel. There is also a redesigned M4A1 that has been floated that uses the Supernova collapsible stock and has a railed handguard assembly from the factory. I don’t think these options have been imported to America yet.
  9. 3 points
    Finally an easier solution for adding a Limbsaver to the Benelli M4 is available. This is significantly easier and requires fewer parts in the past assemblies of the 10111 model that required the Noveske adapter plate that is no longer sold. For this assembly we'll be using the Limbsaver 10403. This model has a raised lip on the inside of the buttpad that helps center the pad on the stock. First step is to remove the collapsible stock from your shotgun. You will then need to remove the factory buttpad by using a philips screw driver and inserting it in to the two small holes on the factory buttpad. Use a little oil or spit on the driver to help push it in. Push the driver in firmly as you unscrew the fasteners. Pull the buttpad away from the stock as you unscrew it. The screws will remain captive inside of the buttpad. Not the large hole roughly in the center of the stock. This is where the receiver extension passes thru the stock and in to the buttpad when the stock is in the fully collapsed position. The next step is to fit your buttpad to the stock. I had to purchase screws from the hardware store to make this buttpad work for this application. I used M4 machine screws, 0.7 thread pitch, 16mm in length. You will need two of them. The ones I bought use a 2.5mm allen head driver. Press the screws in to the Limbsaver buttpad through the two holes in the rubber. Use your driver to press since it will have to push past the rubber. They will snap in to place once seated. You'll see the threads sticking out of the bottom of the buttpad. Screw the buttpad on to the stock. Note the two holes top and bottom for accessing the screws. Now we need to make a hole in the plastic base of the buttpad for the receiver extension to pass in to. Now that you have the pad attached to the stock, you'll want to get a Sharpie marker with the cap off and drop it down the hole of the collapsible stock where the receiver extension goes. I use a silver one since it makes it easier to see the marks. I shake the stock around a little to get the marker to give me a witness mark as to where I am going to drill. Now remove the buttpad from the stock and check your witness marks. You should have something like this. You now know roughly where you need to drill your 7/8" hole. Rather than trying to bore that big of a hole in one pass, you'll have better luck starting small and moving up. I start with a 1/4" Forester bit and drill it out on a drill press. You do not want to drill all the way through the buttpad. You only want to drill through the plastic back which will open up to a void inside the buttpad. I suppose you could drill this out with a electric drill, but your quality of work is likely going to suffer. First hole is drilled. Take the pad and offer it back up to the stock. Look down the hole where the receiver extension goes down with a flash light and see how close to center your hole is to the hole you're looking down. I see that I'm a little off center to the right of the screen. No problem. Move to the next size up bit 3/8" and try to correct for the alignment. Continue through the 1/2, 5/8 and finally the 7/8 bit. Here is the end results. Clean out all the plastic debris from inside the buttpad and clean up the edges. I use a deburring tool but you don't have to get that fancy. Offer the buttpad up to the stock again and check to see if you can see the sides of the buttpad through the hole. You should be looking straight in to the hole drilled. If an edge is present, it will liely contact the receiver extension and prevent it from collapsing. You can hog out the hole slightly with no ill effects on performance. Finally offer up the stock with the buttpad screwed in place to the shotgun and see if the stock fully collapses. If it hangs up, you need to remove the offending area. If it fits, finalize the installation by applying some blue Loctite 243 to the screws then snug them up. No retard strength is needed. These threaded holes will strip easily if you muscle it. Use your fingers to hole the buttpad in alignment to the stock as you tighten it. There is a small amount of wiggle room in the pad that will allow you to even out the alignment. Make sure everything still fits after you've tightened the screws. The rubber of the Limbsaver will often times have a dried out look to it. You can rub some lubricant on the rubber with a rag and it will return it to a deep black finish. Limbsaver claims you'll see a 70% reduction in perceived recoil with these pads. That figure is a little optimistic. Realistically I'd say you'll see a 40% reduction.
  10. 3 points
    Or you could go lower profile: And a big advantage in that it already has a mounting solution.
  11. 3 points
    For the opposite side of the weapons light.
  12. 3 points
    The forum has been really slow lately, so I figured I'd try to add some content again. Recently I was contacted by a client to put together the ultimate Benelli M4 with a focus on reliability, and reduced perceived recoil. Cost is not a concern. The main goal was to have a shotgun built for home defense. So, with that said, here is the roughed out plan. The M4 is a 11707 model. It's an older version that has an aluminum trigger frame. The shotgun itself is brand new and never appears to have been fired. This is an 18.5" barreled model. Receiver Upgrades - Loading Port Modifications - GG&G Oversized Bolt Release - TTI Stainless Bolt Handle - FFT Reproduction Handguards Stippled by Tango Arms Stock Upgrades - Benelli M4 OEM Collapsible Stock - IWC MOE QD Sling Mount - Limbsaver 11011 Custom Fit with Noveski Adapter Plate Magazine Tube Assembly - Carriercomp Titanium Full Length Magazine Tube, internals polished - Carriercomp Magazine Follower (Old style with the red plastic indicator) - Carriercomp/Wolff Magazine Spring Trigger Pack - A&S Engineering Trigger Frame - FFT Trigger/Hammer/Disconnector Kit - FFT Shell Elevator - DMW Oversized Safety - Wolff Trigger Pack Spring Kit Sights and Optics - Scalarworks Sync Rail - Trijicon RMR Type 2, RM09 - 1moa dot size - Meprolight Night Sights Weapon Light Package - Surefire M600DF 1500 lumen output. - Impact Weapon Components Benelli M4 Light/Sling Mount - Surefire tailcap modified to remove the shroud Sling - BlueForceGear Padded QD Sling Refinish All parts are to be refinished in NP3 by Robar. Plastics will remain black. Items such as the lamp head on the weapon light will be painted to match the NP3 finish. The Trijicon RMR will be left alone. I received the shotgun on August 6, 2019. By August 7, 2019, the shotgun had been fully disassembled down to the smallest parts. Threaded parts were cleaned up chemically and with a wire wheel to remove any thread locker compound. Cleaning the parts up eats up a lot of time when done right. Even the bolt head is disassembled which is nearly an impossible task without some specialized tools. Getting that roll pin that holds the extractor claw out is almost an impossible task. You need a tiny curved punch in order to tap it out successfully. I disassembled his pistol grip stock so that the sling hardware and the installation screw inside the stock will all be plated in NP3 as well. As expected, the two screws that hold the rear sight in place are destroyed upon removal (the tip of the screw almost always breaks off.) I believe LPA stakes the top of the screw and creates that cupped shape. The nut that holds the front sight in place is a one time use item and will be replaced upon reassembly. This nut cannot be NP3 plated since it has a nylock insert. Small springs are bagged and tagged for reassembly. Some of them are confusing to know the difference by just looking at them. Springs like the one that holds the bolt handle detent and the extractor claw spring can be easily confused with ones from the trigger pack. I'll begin the loading port modifications once the A&S trigger frame arrives. I plan to go high, on the port, but not as high as Briley. I also plan to open the mouth more than Briley typically does. The entire loading port will be dehorned and there will not be a single sharp edge inside the mouth. Mine are all done by hand, so it is a little tedious. The owner supplied the carriercomp components, and the shipment from FFT arrived already. The handguards from FFT were mailed out to Tango Arms this morning. Will update with more as we move forward.
  13. 3 points
  14. 3 points
    Had this happen on a 20ga. M2. Yeah, I tried the alcohol wipe-down. No joy. You could take a fingernail and bite into the plastic. I figured an improper mix/cure process on the material. Called Benelli. They sent me a new stock.
  15. 3 points
    There is a lot of extremely good comments and advice here, IMO. Deciding to arm yourself at home or concealed carry away from home is really a lifestyle change. That can sound overwhelming but it shouldn't deter you from taking the first step on the journey. Other than parroting what others have already said, my best advice is for you and your wife to do it together if you can; this should be easier because it will be new to the both of you and you won't have the typical scenario of the know-it-all husband telling the little wifey what she needs and how to do it. Do some research on gun shops and training in your local area and talk to people and co-workers. One word of caution though, don't buy a gun because someone told you it is what you or your wife needs. Rent guns at a local range and get training on how to use them. There are many examples of people thinking that a particular weapon is right for them only to try a few others that they like better because of fit, weight, caliber, recoil, operating system, etc. I am a member of US Concealed Carry Association (USCCA). They provide insurance for their members that are involved in a self defense shooting but they also have a great magazine and training to help you on this journey. I would definitely heed what Evolution said regarding what is a justified shoot. USCCA discusses this aspect of self-defense often. Obviously you've done a bit of research already as you know the M4 and are on this site. Nine .32 caliber pellets hitting a target at 1200+ feet per second is very lethal and the reason my M4 sits behind my bedroom door loaded with buck. But, I also have pistols stashed around the house and garage and another on my hip. Not to insult you here, but it is a common misperception that a shotgun doesn't need to be aimed and can be used effectively when shot form the hip. A shotgun is NOT a street sweeper unless your watching a movie with Doc Holiday in it. It HAS TO BE AIMED like any other long gun as the pattern of pellets will not spread like the movies would lead you to believe. 00 buckshot will pattern around the size of a baseball at 30' and roughly 12" at 75'. These numbers can and will vary but not enough to argue about when considering the topic. Do a little You-Tube/Googling on shotgun patterns to get a better feel for it. As it sounds like budget is not a huge obstacle for you, you might consider his and her weapons whether they be shotguns, handguns or a combination of both. As a matter of reference, I don't consider myself anything of an expert on guns. I'm not a big burly and bearded guy with punisher tattoos on my arms and I don't do sweaty black and white photo shoots for Guns & Ammo magazine. I'm just a firearms enthusiast and a student of self defense. I hope you and your wife start the journey and really enjoy the ride -- it can be very fun and addicting!
  16. 3 points
    I will agree that training is very important. Both you and your wife should pursue that. The M4 is an excellent choice for a home defense shotgun. It's probably a better choice than a pump because of inexperienced people short stroking the pump action and not feeding the next round in a rush. A semi auto would be more reliable when shooting quickly. As Stranger and Nails have said. Consider a handgun as well. The M4 is only good if you have it with you which is not very likely all the time as you move around your property. A handgun is easier to be carried always. There are many small 9mm semi autos to choose from. Spend time at a range where they also sell and you can try different models with your wife. Select what feels right and seems intuitive to shoot. I would suggest looking at the Sig P365 MS (manual safety) which is small and easy to carry around,. Another good choice is the Glock 19, though it's larger. It just depends on what you like and what she likes. Regardless of what you decide, training and understanding Situational Awareness (like Don said) is very important. You do not want a weapon to become a liability instead of an asset.
  17. 3 points
    Check your local community for firearms courses of instruction on "home defense". Many shooting ranges/academies/centers provide classes covering protecting your family and home. Your spouse can attend to learn, as well. Most "Home Defense" courses of instruction will cover firearm types, techniques and tactics, as well as, safe room setup, surveillance, and the most important item being maintaining Situational Awareness.
  18. 3 points
    The M4 will fire that crappy Walmart valuepack 2 3/4 birdshot all day long if you want. Gun store commando trying to sell you what he has on hand.
  19. 3 points
    My M4 looks just like any other right now, but the custom case with a benelli flashlight and a interestingly gripped knife with a matching serial number is pretty unique. The only downside is the case is a bit oversized, and the foam isn’t cut in a way that permits adding an RMR, a light, or a stock with an adjustable length of pull so I might have to buy another pelican case.
  20. 3 points
    Benelli would be happy to sell you a model with all the evil features. Unfortunately too many people vote Democrat and they threw a bunch of feel good useless laws in the way. Then you have a bunch of cuck Republicans that go along with their crap. Don’t think too much about having to buy parts just to get the features you want. Think more along the lines that you’re upgrading your bad ass shotgun. If my M4 came with a full length OEM steel mag tube, I’d be buying a Carriercomp anyway for the other benefits.
  21. 3 points
    15,000 rounds later and a mix of Nickel Boron and NP3 plated parts with a surface layer of burnt bronze Cerakote. Due to the ongoing crisis, I decided it would be a good time to clean the M4. I have just been shooting more oil in to the M4 for the past two years or so. It's ate about 2,500 rounds in that period of time without any failures. I decided to delete the iron sights from my M4 since they obstruct the view of the optic. My Intellibeam weapon light is off being painted for the past month or so, so I'm roughing it with my 500 lumen M600C head that was painted previously. The bolt carrier group and trigger group is all NP3.
  22. 3 points
    I'm a fan of the velcro systems over the hard mounted ones. The velcro ones weigh less and crush flat when not in use. I didn't care for how stiff it was to pull the shells from the Mesa one either.
  23. 3 points
    RPC - Epic story of your loving wife! I like your build but curious about the light and its operation. Looks like an end-cap switch. Have you run the gun with HD loads and manipulated the light as you might in a HD situation? Do you change your thumb position to switch the light then back to more of a standard grip? Just wondering about the ease of operation and if the bezel around the end cap digs into your thumb during recoil. Would a remote tape switch be better? I guess this question would make for a new topic.
  24. 3 points
    I almost died by a bear attack, I live up north where the big ones roam.. I knew a 12ga slug was a great choice for bear protection and carried a Mossberg pump action and practiced with it regularly. At the time I was against a semi-auto shotgun because I had convinced myself that simple was better,.. and who in there right mind would pay $2000 for a shotgun!? 😏 I woke up covered in moss and fresh pungent soil. My breathing was raspy as though I had flim that I couldn't quite cough up. I couldn't see out of my left eye and I could smell and taste that distinctive iodiney smell of blood. My heart pounded back alive with a great rush of adrenaline as I started to recall what had happened to me and where I currently was.... I was buried alive, by a bear. You see, a bear wont usually eat something its killed right away, it will bury it and come back to it later after it has ripened up a bit. This knowledge was flooding through my brain faster than the speed of light as I lay there contemplating my next move. I've told this story over and over again now thousands of times and I've come to realize that we; the bear and I, were playing a chess game of sorts. He made his move by hunting me down and attacking me, I countered his move by a misplaced shotgun slug due to adrenaline followed by a short-stroke of my shotgun leaving me with nothing but a "click" of the trigger when it really needed to count. The bear did what he does best and I assumed the fetal position playing dead until I couldn't stand the pain any longer of him ripping off a but cheek and almost removing my left foot. I blacked out. I didnt realize just how comfortable I was in this makeshift early grave until I decided to move. The pain was unlike anything Id ever experienced before and I let out a grown that didn't even sound like it came from me. Now,..back to the chess part..... This entire time the bear was sitting a few feat away so as I had just got my first breath of "dirt nap" freedom the all to familiar crunching sound of bear teeth on my skull was back again....actually this whole story is made up for your enjoyment...the reason I purchased a m4 is because I got tired of my m3 jamming. have a good day gents. Picture my camera took during the attack ...Im on bottom..
  25. 3 points
    I plan on it. Nothing else to put it on. I liked my MRO on my SBE II so much I put one in my M4 as well.
  26. 3 points
    Funny you should ask, this particular seminal fluid collector was made by our very own resident engineer and horse whisperer. Word has it he's one hell of a Nerf-gun painter too!
  27. 3 points
    CTL seems really promising. They're the ones who were actually doing Robar's plating. So if you like it, you'll like their product. I'm setting up under my FFL to be a processor/dealer for them. I don't think they intend to accept firearms from the general public, but their dealers will be able to act as a middleman. It doesn't seem like they'll have any gunsmithing services for complex disassembly. If this all shakes out, I'll gladly accept shipments as I've done for years and be that middle man who can tear it down and reassemble it properly.
  28. 2 points
    Great range report! Has anyone taken a shotgun course at Front Site? I've completed their 4-day defensive handgun class and it was good training. I've posted the attached before and hopefully it is helpful for those seeking weight reduction as this thread mentions. The "Reduction/Addition" columns reflect what I have changed out since I first added all the accessories to the gun. Such as, getting rid of the Mesa side saddle for a Vang Comp and replacing the Nordic 7 round mag tube with a CC tube. Weights of other components like handguards really helped me decide to stay with the OEM foregrips; besides I like the way they grip. M4 Accessory Weights (4).xlsx
  29. 2 points
    Flip that thing right now on GB to the panic buyers. Use half the money for a Corona vacation and the other half for a NIB M4 when things cool down. LOL
  30. 2 points
    I've got one that I took off of my M4. PM me with where to send it. Once you have it, send me whatever you think it was worth.
  31. 2 points
    Hi. I bought a cosmetically challenged M2 a few weeks ago and am tidying it up. I've had the stock and fore end wrapped in 3m Di-noc carbon fibre and the barrel powder coated. I'm waiting on an order of Briley bits (charging handle, release and safety button, trigger pad and fore end weight along with some TTI springs) I'll post a few more pictures when completed. Steve (UK)
  32. 2 points
    Sorry you didn't get what you apparently ordered but those slugs are my preference over the 1600FPS stuff. I have some of the 1600 FPS stuff on hand but, for general shooting purposes and HD, the 1300 FPS stuff is the ticket. You can shoot those all day long. The 1600's are hard kicking, even in an M4.
  33. 2 points
    It's a Wilton 63199#1745 Tradesman Vise. US production model.
  34. 2 points
    It is really just an extended and ported choke tube with wicked looking teeth on the end. The “no slugs” comes from it being an “Extra Full” constriction. Carlson also marketed a Cylinder constriction tube in the same style that was OK with any shell type. Both are showing "out of stock" at Brownells and Carlsons
  35. 2 points
  36. 2 points
    Drill/tap a blind hole about .250” deep. (Don't drill all the way through – that can weaken the attachment of the stud to the shell latch.)
  37. 2 points
    When I had the Larue Mount, I tightened the lever really tight and it kept it from tearing it up. The Sync rail is a better setup in my experience. You can’t get any better than the Carriercomp tube. They custom blend the Cerakote finish to match the factory barrel. It matches better than the OEM tubes.
  38. 2 points
    Have you looked at the Intellibeam version of the Scout? M600IB model. It auto gates itself from 100-600 lumens depending on how much light blow back you’re receiving from things like indoor walls. It rapidly changes so fast in output that you barely even notice it. The m300 and m600 tailcaps are the same. So it will jam your thumb if you’re riding your thumb on the momentary button and fire a 12 gauge round. I’he been working out a new light mounting solution which uses the 13” Briley rail, an IWC inline MLOK light mount, the light of your choosing mounted far forward on the ejection port side for a right hand shooter so the bezel or the light is flush with the muzzle. Then a Unity Tactical Hot Button is installed which is essentially a push button momentary/on/off button with a 9 inch wire routed to the left side rail roughly where you want your support hand thumb to reach. Slap on rail covers that you like on the MLOK and add a QD angled sling mount to the rail all the way forward at 9 o’clock. You’d have less risk of jamming your thumb, but not completely eliminated.
  39. 2 points
    So this my M4 with the mlok handguard from briley. Also has the match trigger, a & s trigger guard, extended safety, and opened loading port. will post a couple more pics when I get home. I’ve got just a couple more things like a front grip
  40. 2 points
    As an FYI, ShootingSight should be releasing a tool steel hammer for the M4 in a couple of months. If you are interested, please email [email protected], and we will get in touch as soon as they are available. These will be CNC machined Rolled Plate S7 Tool Steel, so the highest grade you can get. Price TBD - under $100. It will be 100% US made, so 922R compliant. Art Neergaard ShootingSight llc www.shootingsight.com
  41. 2 points
    So are you going to pin the stock so it can't telescope? Otherwise, under current California law, you would be manufacturing and possessing an unregistered assault weapon by having a semi auto shotgun with a pistol grip and telescoping stock.
  42. 2 points
    Growing up in the 90's, I had a M121 Benelli that had a full length magazine tube and a pistol grip. Somehow I got myself signed up for a a mailing list with Benelli. In the propaganda, they started showing photos of the Benelli M4 which was being tested by the Marine Corps at Aberdeen. Obviously it looked awesome and the ARGO system sounded promising. At the time it wasn't released to the public in America. At some point they released the M1014 to the public in its limited 2,500 run with its non-functioning collapsible stock. A while later, the 11703 model was released. This had a ill fated four port barrel and the same neutered receiver extension. This model came with the pistol grip stock and was generally cheaper than the limited edition. In 2004 I cashed out a bunch of vacation time and bought it for 1,350.00 from gunbroker. I promptly broke the shotgun firing high base loads through that horrible 4 port design. Shotgun went back to Benelli for repairs. I then broke it again since that barrel battered the bolt carrier to the point that it was peening the face of the bolt carrier from the pistons. Back to Benelli again where they replace the bolt carrier, the barrel with a 2 port design and the handguards. I then figured out how to replace the receiver extension with a 11707 models and added a collapsible stock. So I pretty much took the longest road possible to making a 11707.
  43. 2 points
    Welcome! Hide your wallet.
  44. 2 points
    Glad I could help! I’m surprised there aren’t more tutorial based threads on forums. The ones I do find skip over the pain in the ass parts and leave you to assume how to get from point B to C to D. I end up looking at my own posts to remember how I did certain things in the past. I never liked the YouTube based tutorials since I found them to be too fast and hard to navigate. Plus I’d had to sit there and talk thru the video. If we can keep the photo hosting up, there should be no real issues in keeping these active for years to come.
  45. 2 points
    Wright Armory seemed like they would do simple stuff and had some gunsmithing service options. I'm not sure if they'd be willing to disassemble the M4 since a few areas are a specialty area. Areas like removing the receiver extension from the receiver. I sent a bunch of titanium parts in, so hopefully they just do it like they have in the past. That's my hope is that they just don't warranty the work. I was quoted 2-5 weeks, which is significantly faster than Robar was at 12-16 weeks. We'll see if that's legit.
  46. 2 points
    You wouldn't change your position no matter what amount of evidence was given, so why bother? Telling you about the M4s' with 10,000 rounds of high base through them with EOTech 552's would be a waste of time. Or the 100+ Benelli M4's that have come thru my shop for work in various configurations. So why argue? You can do as you like.
  47. 2 points
    I contacted suarez international and they say they are still able to do NP3 coats. I asked how since Robar has gone out of business. They said they have their own people do it in house. That's the link to their site just for NP3 options. https://suarezinternational.com/np3-metal-finishing/
  48. 2 points
    The M4 is pretty drop safe. I was concerned about the design years ago. So I unloaded it and repeatedly bounced the gun on the carpet in various angles to try to get the hammer to fall. It never happened. You’d need to throw it hard enough for the trigger to be pulled in order for the hammer to drop I don’t think you could shock the hammer to get past the trigger hook or the disconnector if it rebounded enough. What I use the safety. Round in the chamber, magazine topped off. I don’t mess with ghost loading since I’ve seen it cause malfunctions. I use a larger DMW safety that I can feel poke my trigger finger when the safety is engaged. It’s instant feedback to know its condition. I also trim 1.5 coils from the spring so that I can press the safety without breaking my firing grip. It’s still firm to press, but not factory straining firm. As a certified firearms instructor, I should add some comments about safe storage. I’d urge everyone to store their firearms in some kind of safe even if you don’t have children. A cousin of mine when he was 3-4 went to someone’s house who didn’t have children and they had the shotgun leaned against the back of a door. No one thought of the gun and he went and grabbed it being young and not knowing any better. He pressed the trigger and the shotgun discharged thru the roof right next to his head. He was fine, but it could have easily not been. The only victim that day was the sheet rock in that guy’s trailer along with his pride. There are a bunch of cool high speed locking systems out there now with biometrics and back up PIN numbers. They have them for rifle and shotgun storage now, not just pistols. They’re not meant to protect against theft, they’re meant to keep the firearm out of unauthorized users’ hands and keep them accessible to you if needed. From a training perspective, if the firearm has been out of your immediate control for any length of time, should you trust that it is still in the condition you left it in? No one wants to spend a couple hundred bucks on a lock box. Most of them suck anyway, but what if you got one that presented the pistol grip to you so you could draw it easily with the trigger guard covered? Sweeping a loaded pistol off a night stand in the dark can be a safety issue. Did the cat jump on it and move the way you position it? Depending where you live can add another layer of culpability if an unauthorized user gets ahold of one of your firearms. Even if they’re a burglar. Having at least this second layer of protection will help keep you out of trouble when LaShawn steals your gun and smokes the cashier at the Stop & Rob.
  49. 2 points
    I haven't had good luck with a heatgun on any of the newer M4's. I tried for two hours on one once and got nowhere. The MAPP torch is the way to go. It only takes about 3 - 4 minutes to break the factory thread locker down. You can use the existing locknut which is 27mm on the new receiver extension.
  50. 2 points
    Would be glad to help. If you want to tackle it yourself, it is something that you could be walked through. It will require heat to get the existing receiver extension off. I use a MAPP torch which is pretty inexpensive and safe to use.
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